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Class C

For those of you that travel in a Class C.

99 topics in this forum

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  1. Looking for a Super C

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  2. Driver seat replacement

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  3. Getting into overhead bunk

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  4. Road noise

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  5. 1994 Class C Remodel

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  6. Newbies with 'Oldie'

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  7. Carry Mobility Scooter

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  8. George

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    • This morning I was taking trash to the dumpster. My neighbor was talking to her cat. The cat sat there like she was listening. I went back to the RV. My Golden Retriever was on the patio so I took my coffee out there and told him about the neighbor talking to her cat. We both had a big laugh.
    • Unless you have a camper that dates back to the 80's your water lines should be PEX.  Earlier systems were a gray colored plastic pipe made of Polybutylene.  Some campers continued to use soft copper pipe with no-solder compression fittings. The weakest part of the PEX system used on RV's is the cheap plastic L's and similar connectors/fittings commonly used to save a few pennies.  Hopefully you have brass fittings rather than black plastic - the gray plastic fittings are somewhat stronger than the black ones.  The brass Shark Bite no crimp connectors are very durable.  1/2" PEX has a burst pressure of almost 500 psi at 75 degrees F.  It will expand under pressure - the plastic fittings will not expand.  You will not break a PEX line unless you hook directly to a fire hydrant. When the "fixed" regulators first appeared and Polybutylene pipe was used most all RV manufacturers advised a maximum pressure of 40 psi.  These in-line fixed 40-psi devices were NOT true regulators but rather flow restrictions with a spring loaded stop valve that caused a drop in pressure once a water faucet was turned on.   IMHO, the most sensitive part of a RV water system to high pressure is the toilet.  The flush valve can easily fail at "high" pressure.  Second is the water supply hose - the "white hose" that sits in the sun on a hot day with a park having 80 psi at the water connection.  Anyway, I use the adjustable brass unit with a gauge as shown in the previous pics and set the pressure going into the camper at 60 psi provided the particular park I am in has that much pressure.  I try to put the regulator at or as close as possible to the park connection.  If the park pressure is below 40 psi I fill my fresh water tank and run my 5.2 GPM variable speed pump set to 60 psi. I have encountered park pressures as low as 20 psi and as high as 110 psi.  They are all a crap shoot.  BTW - the glycerin filled gauges are a better quality than what we usually buy for our regulators.  They are externally water proof, made of stainless steel and brass and less likely to be damaged by freezing temps.    
    • https://www.rvwaterfilterstore.com/custom-built-hoses
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