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ARGO

protection from dog attack

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OK, I apologize in advance. I'm looking for the final consensus on protecting yourself and pet from a loose aggressive dog. Now I've spent 20 minutes searching   "dog" with words attack, protection, deterrent, defense, spray and every other darn word I can think of & pretty much the same posts come up which are irrelevant. Please, someone tell me what to search to get what I want or direct me to the thread (which I know is on here many times).

SHEESH!

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One thing you could do is go to the "RVing with pets" sub forum and search ONLY that forum.  It might cut down on the unrelated results.

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While it may not be a good answer for you, in our many years of RV travel I have rarely ever had an occasion that I'd have used something of the sort if I had something. I think that you may find what you are looking for if you visit the "Friendly Dog Repellent" thread. 

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Our standard schnauzer has been attacked 3 times by off leash aggressive dogs.  I now carry a 5 foot long maple walking stick and a pepper spray.  Keep you animals on leash and away from me or suffer the pain.

Ken

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Tks! BTW, if me or my guys are attacked, I'm not inclined to be "friendly", I'll go nuclear.

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1 hour ago, ARGO said:

Tks! BTW, if me or my guys are attacked, I'm not inclined to be "friendly", I'll go nuclear.

If that is what you'll do, why make the post.  Just remember that what action you choose, you are also choosing the consequences.  If you're okay with that, then you have answered your own question.

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Carry dog repellant. It works.  We had unleashed dogs coming after us while bike riding. One spray & they take off yelping.

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We were confronted with two younger pit bulls while we had our two larger senior dogs on leashes walking.  These dogs were very fast but obviously inexperienced bitters.  They were trying to grab the necks of our dogs which were both wearing metal pinch collars which protected their necks.  I used a knuckle blaster stun gun on them when they went for the rear ends.  The owners finally came and called them back.  I have also had experience with a cattle dog and a Siberian husky coming after a single dog, both of those dogs were very fast.  Our dogs show no aggression at all, and they think that other dogs are coming to make friends.  Although most RVers don't have vicious dogs, some do especially with the variety of people that full-time live in RVs now, and dogs can be loose and run into the RV park areas from adjoining neighborhoods.  Just keep in mind that some dogs/breeds are very agile and quick.  Stun guns work well to discourage most dogs from approaching with just the static sound, not with the young pitbulls though. We have seen a lot of construction and pipe line workers with larger dogs that they travel with for protection.  I have upgraded my knuckle blaster stun to a larger and more powerful stun stick with flashlight.  They also have walking sticks with a stun feature.   Do my dogs get loose and go after anyone?  No, they don't.  

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2 Smith and Wesson products are on our persons when dw and I are out for a stroll or ride...an expanding steel baton is in my hand I keep it collapsed until needed and use it as a exercise weight while walking,  changing between hands doing arm exercises..a quick flick of the wrist converts to a formidable "stick" makes a loud sound when deployed that gets attention and has deterred 2 dogs on separate occasions.  It has a holster that can attach to belt but I find it's less conspicuous just carrying in hands..the other is a 340 pd airlite hammer less in a pocket that so far has stayed there not being necessary..yes they are both lethal weapons but are our choices and we accept full responsibility for being in our possession or use.

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Our letter carrier burst into our office one day leaking tears and snot heading for the lavatory. “Damn dog was upwind!” he sez...

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Walking stick, stun gun or tazer, pepper spray or bear spray and finally if all else fails a hand gun. 

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Quite a few years ago our neighbor's overweight pit bull got loose and visited our dog, who was on a run line. The pit wanted to fight, and our dog was more interested in playing. Our dog was backing up as the pit came toward him. Finally the pit lunged. As he made contact with the front end of our dog, out dog's hind end made contact with the electric fence. There was a brown streak going one way and a black one going the other, but dogs crying in pain. By that time the neighbor arrived to get his dog. We told him what happened, and we all had a good laugh.

When we host we frequently have to tell people that their dogs need to be on a leash whenever outside of their vehicle. When we're not hosting we may mention it if a dog comes up to us, but usually we will just report it to the host or ranger.

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Beware of the "well trained dog" !!

Many years ago, the next door neighbor had a very large German Shepard.  The dog had been obedience trained and was allowed to be off leash.  He would stay in the driveway close to the young (about 20 yr old) kid while he worked on his VW van.

There were two cats a few doors down who would languish in the street on the warm asphalt pavement.  One day I witnessed "Randy" (the Shepard) decide it was more than he could handle and launched at the cats.  The dog owner saw this, yelled the dog's name and Randy came to a screeching halt - like he had hit an invisible brick wall.  Wow!  Very impressive!

Some time later, we had walked to the corner market (7-11, or) with our two kids who were about 6 (girl) and 10 (boy) to get an ice cream or whatever.  On the way back they ran ahead of us, and around my van which was in the driveway to "hide" from us.  I heard my daughter yell (scream) - as unknown to us,  "Randy" had been in the driveway next door (unleashed) - saw the kid/s run around the van - and (I guess) figured it was some kind of "aggression".  He chomped on my daughter's leg - but quickly released.  On checking her leg, she had bite marks (thru her jeans), one of which was a slight  puncture.

So - we figured she probably should have a tetnus shot.  The doc said he was bound by law to notify animal control of the bite (he did) - which resulted in the dog being quarantined for two weeks.

That resulted in "Bad Karma" with the neighbor - the lady (owner) said she was completely comfortable with the dog being loose around her  2 yr old grandchild, etc. etc. - WE were the bad guys!  Fortunately, they were renters and moved a few months later.

The "moral of the story" is obvious - don't trust ANY dog that is "off leash" - no matter what the owner tells you - even if you are a "believer" from what you may have previously seen. "Things" (circumstances) may change in an instant.

.

 

 

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The dog that bit me was a family pet that had never shown aggression before the day he chased a neighbor boy up a street sign, ran off, then returned and bit me. Yes, I had to have a tetanus shot. Fortunately the rabies test came back negative. The family had the dog put down because they could no longer trust it around their own kids. You really cannot predict when a pet might go rogue. I am firmly in favor of leash laws.

Linda

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We're at a campground that is pretty empty Sunday evening through Thursday afternoon. People start coming in on Thursday, and by Saturday morning the place is full. The rule is that dogs must be on a leash, but it isn't enforced. The first weekend we were here a family of "regulars" had two large dogs that were "leased" by an electronic leash. I don't know exactly how those things work, but I suspect that if the dog was really intent on getting past the boundary there would be no real consequences. There might be a moment of pain as the boundary was crossed, but once on the other side it would be just like being inside as far as the dog was concerned.

This weekend a group of people had several campsites near us. One of them had two or three larger dogs that looked like Labs. The first thing they did when the dogs were released from the truck was to let the dogs jump into the lake for a swim. They were leased for the rest of the weekend.

Just now a man came back from the bathhouse and his dog (looked like it has dome boxer in it) was running free.

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Back when I was a young kid with a paper route I carried a squirt gun with ammonia/water mix.  Shot in the eyes stopped aggressive dogs in their tracks.

Lenp 

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11 hours ago, lenp said:

Back when I was a young kid with a paper route I carried a squirt gun with ammonia/water mix.  Shot in the eyes stopped aggressive dogs in their tracks.

Lenp 

I like. It’s my winda cleaning bottle I fergot to leave at camp when I went for a walk.

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Right now there are three rigs in the campground, all widely spaced, with us in the middle. This morning I was doing stuff outside, when I turned around and saw a large dog at the front corner of our coach. It growled at me and I get inside as quickly as I could. A few minutes later it was checking out the firepit at the next site, so I hopped into the car and drove up to the host. He immediately went to the rig that he thought owned that dog.

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Anyone ever use an air horn in an aggressive dog situation?  I got one for bears and have started to carry it all the time now for off-leash, aggressive dogs, too, but haven't had a chance to test it (hope I don't get the chance!).  I suppose another benefit is it would immediately call attention to the situation in case help is needed.

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What if the dog is deaf?  Our beagle is 13 years old and has lost a lot of her hearing.  She has other issues because she still thinks and always has thought she was a Great Dane.

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I have always found a loud "NO!" stops dogs in their tracks.  And it usually attracts the attention of potential dog owners in close proximity.

I like the idea of an air horn, unless I have my dog with me.  Wouldn't want to freak him out.

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