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Kay Markle

Sewer hoses on the ground

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Can anyone tell me which states require that sewer hoses be raised off the ground. I understand that it is a good idea, but the question has been asked "is it against regulations?". 

Any information will be appreciated.

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I don't know of listing for state requirements, but I have seen individual parks requiring it regardless of any state requirement. My take would be to simply follow the park's rules on it.

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Being on the ground is not really the issue - if it is on the ground it is flat - no flow to drain properly. What you should do is set the sewer hose on a slope from the rig to the drain so that it empties efficiently.

John

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I’ve stayed at a number of campgrounds that require it, but haven’t heard of any state code that requires it.  I think some state parks require it also but don’t know if that’s a state-wide requirement or just that state park system.

Interesting question, I never really thought about it since I always use a ladder system for my sewer hose.

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It's not states that I'm aware of.... it's county and city ordinances.  It was required in Benson, AZ... don't know if that's still the case.

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I hook up my sewer lines only when I need to empty. They last much longer that way and I have very large tanks so I can go over 2 weeks. Am contemplating an incinerating toilet and will be further able to lengthen the times between dump requirements. My first experience living in an RV in South Florida I had neighbor children who seemed to delight running over the hoses despite my politely informing their parents of the actions. "My kids would never do that. " was the response I got. 

 

Rod 

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I think I have stayed at 1 campground in the past 5 years full timing that required me to do that. Not sure what the thinking behind it is, but if those are the rules then that is what will be done. As stated I believe it is a campgrounds rule not city or state rules. 

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The campground I wintered at in Wickenburg, AZ for 3 years required the hoses to be off the ground.  They said an inspector went through the park and it was required.  What inspector??  I have no idea, but we all complied and I've done it ever since.  

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3 hours ago, fpmtngal said:

I’ve stayed at a number of campgrounds that require it, but haven’t heard of any state code that requires it.  I think some state parks require it also but don’t know if that’s a state-wide requirement or just that state park system.

Interesting question, I never really thought about it since I always use a ladder system for my sewer hose.

Lots of towns in Arizona (and maybe some counties) require that.   It allows anyone to see small seepage from the bottom of the hose which could happen because it is against desert landscape in most cases.   We have always used supports to gently slope the hose to the drain for better movement of fluids.

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23 hours ago, Barbaraok said:

We have always used supports to gently slope the hose to the drain for better movement of fluids.

The sewer hose connection for our Beaver is below the basement floor and it is exceedingly difficult to maintain a slope to a drain, particularly if it is placed above ground level as many of them are.   I do the best I can but many sewer hose supports are taller than the height of my sewer output, especially when I've dumped the airbags.

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Joel, our MH is the same.   I don't use the first few links in our hose support and tend to end up with a U dip,  before the hose will work on the support, but  we make do.    

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I never left a sewer hose out. Hooked it up, did the dump and rinse, put it away. That said I did have to sometimes walk the hose lifting it as I went to get everything to flow. There's one casino where the dump is a standpipe on a concrete island; I refused to use that one. Hmmm. I wonder if that's why they placed it there?

Linda

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I am full time and usually stay in the same site for a month or two. I almost always use the hose support to keep the hose off the ground and prevent damage to the hose. I have had rocks or thorns puncture a small pin hole which is undetected until the next flush and then you get an old faithful effect. If I am only staying a couple of days I sometimes don’t use the hose support. 

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7 hours ago, sandsys said:

....That said I did have to sometimes walk the hose lifting it as I went to get everything to flow...

The turd herd....

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You can always tell an RV forum that has a lot of REAL RVers - - there is always a thread open dealing with sewer systems. :D

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11 hours ago, sandsys said:

I never left a sewer hose out. Hooked it up, did the dump and rinse, put it away. That said I did have to sometimes walk the hose lifting it as I went to get everything to flow. There's one casino where the dump is a standpipe on a concrete island; I refused to use that one. Hmmm. I wonder if that's why they placed it there?

Linda

That would not be practical for us. Our Teton washing maching drain bypass the gray tank. Goes to discharge.

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On 7/8/2020 at 3:46 PM, lappir said:

I hook up my sewer lines only when I need to empty. Rod 

x2.  It's not a great idea to leave your valves open, especially black.

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4 hours ago, hemsteadc said:

x2.  It's not a great idea to leave your valves open, especially black.

What problems do you see with leaving the grey valve open for extended periods? We're often in one spot for a couple of weeks to a few months and have never had a problem with leaving the grey valve open. I do close it periodically to build up a supply for back flushing the black tank and flushing the sewer hose after dumping when needed.

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1 hour ago, Dutch_12078 said:

We're often in one spot for a couple of weeks to a few months and have never had a problem with leaving the grey valve open. I do close it periodically to build up a supply for back flushing the black tank and flushing the sewer hose after dumping when needed.

I do the very same thing. There is one additional thing that I have learned from experience. I keep the sewer hose on one of the sloping stands for them but I also put a U into it at the entry to the sewer system to form a hydraulic plug like a P-trap in plumbing. It stops odors and bugs from entering the RV waste tanks. 

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We are usually on private land but we leave the grey water open except a couple of times a month I will close it for a couple of days to help keep the tank bottom washed.  Where we are at now it is very dry and private land so we just let the grey go onto the ground.

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I used to leave the grey open but now that my level indicators are not reliable I keep the grey closed. When the shower won’t drain I know it’s time to dump and flush. 

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5 hours ago, Kirk W said:

I do the very same thing. There is one additional thing that I have learned from experience. I keep the sewer hose on one of the sloping stands for them but I also put a U into it at the entry to the sewer system to form a hydraulic plug like a P-trap in plumbing. It stops odors and bugs from entering the RV waste tanks. 

Yep, I do the same thing, Kirk. Works great...

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Concerning the sewer p trap, I did that when we had the DRV and it eliminated an odor. I have not done this with the Teton. Never had an odor.

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2 minutes ago, GlennWest said:

I have not done this with the Teton. Never had an odor.

Some systems seem to push air back up for some reason, but nearly all of them harbor sewer flies or similar creatures. If sewer flies get started breeding inside of your tanks you will probably get more cautious. I only had that experience one time and got more careful, either keeping both valves shut or use the trap. 

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