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docj

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    Anywhere we park for the night

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  1. You're the one who took issue when I said that humans can't make gamma rays because they are created by nuclear processes (or lightning). There simply is no human-created process that can generate electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths that short.
  2. Gamma rays are created by nuclear interactions such as are found in radioactive elements, nuclear weapons explosions, nuclear reactors, neutron stars, etc. One of the most common gamma ray sources is Cobalt-60 which is a man-made isotope used for cancer treatment. If you want to contend that humans can "create" gamma radiation because we can build and explode a nuclear weapon, or because he can synthesize Co-60, then you're welcome to say that. But, in reality, humans aren't "making" the gamma ray. Yes, relatively recently it was discovered that terrestrial gamma ray flashes exist
  3. Gamma rays have a wavelength of a couple of Angstroms; microwaves have wavelengths of a couple of centimeters. There's no comparison and humans can't create gamma rays. But other than that, yes, they are both electromagnetic radiation.
  4. I assume you know that there's no relationship between the electromagnetic radiation used in a microwave oven and the kind of "radiation" associated with nuclear energy. Your statement is a non sequitur.
  5. Many of the fuel rods for which there is no permanent storage facility are stored in "pools" around operating reactors. I'm not a safety expert so I can't speak to the safety aspects of that arrangement.
  6. The US reprocessing I am personally familiar with is what went on at the Department of Energy Hanford site in Washington State. That's where the fuel rods from the production reactors were reprocessed to extract uranium. The "hot stuff" from that reprocessing fills >250 huge tanks at Hanford and is a continuing threat to the Columbia River. The legacy of these Cold War sites added to the fears from TMI, Chernobyl and Fukushima make it difficult to imagine being able to convince the US citizenry to accept nuclear power again, not at least anytime soon.
  7. With all due respect, the problem has NEVER been about where the waste will go. The problem results from the "Carter Doctrine" that stated that the US will not reprocess fuel rods. As a result, instead of separating out the relatively small quantity of highly radioactive wastes and then reusing the fuel rods, we treat the entire fuel rod as waste even though it still contains most of the U235 fuel that hasn't been fissioned. More than 20 years ago I was permitted to visit the facility where France keeps all the vitrified (glassified) high level wastes that are separated from their react
  8. Not yet for something the size of mine: https://www.navitassemi.com/dell-adopts-navitas-ganfast-technology-for-laptop-fast-charger/
  9. How about a replacement for the gigantic 240W power brick that came with my Dell G5. Any chance of finding something smaller?
  10. We currently (this week) have a son, DIL and teenagers who are vacationing in FL because they wanted to. The parents just had their first shots but the kids, of course, have had none. Statistically, they ought to be OK, but we tried to persuade them not to until we were blue in the face. If they come back safe, no doubt they will say "we told you so." It appears to be impossible to get most people to understand risk and probabilities. Yes, most people do recover from COVID-19 but some do die and some have lasting serious symptoms. Yes, there is an annual flu season and peo
  11. I've owned both the 510 and the 507 systems. As I recall the basic sensors for both have the same configuration. There's an outer security case and you remove the 3 screws to take the outer case off. It does NOT open up the sensor itself. Lots of people remove the security shells and use the sensors without them. Once you've removed the security cover you can unscrew the case to replace the battery.
  12. If you search RV forums there are lots of comments about Visible. I had it for ~6 months. It's like many other low priority cellular services--the service can vary from very good to awful on a moment to moment basis or location to location. If you don't need a 24/7 high speed connection, Visible probably will work for you. One of the reason I decided against it was that I like to combine my cellular connections using a load balancing router and Visible was so unstable, at my location, that it messed up the load balancing.
  13. I bought this: Watts OneFlow, no where near that big.
  14. I bought this one: Watts OneFlow. The height is deceptive because you don't drop the bottom out like you do with a whole house filter. You simply unscrew the top and remove the filters. I had more than enough height to install mine in the basement.
  15. For the past several years we've had a 10,000 grain Watts water softener that we've used to deal with hard TX water at our winter location (and elsewhere). However, with the use of a washing machine a softener of that size requires fairly frequent recharging. I know I could have purchased a larger softener but I wanted to share an alternative that we've now installed.For years there have been a variety of devices that have claimed to combat hard water though the use of electricity and magnetism but I've not been convinced that these had any scientific evidence of actually working. But while in
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