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upright piano in front?


odigity
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If I fold up or remove one or both bunks, think that'll be a good spot for an upright piano?

Not yet sure of the exact dimensions because I'm still two months away from seeing my trailer for the first time.  (I've got a countdown calendar on my wall.)

I think the biggest problem will be avoiding pissing off whoever's in the next spot.  :)  I'm guessing trailer walls aren't especially soundproof...

2019-Keystone-Outback-240-URS-16882-100074.jpg

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I was parked next to a flute player for a number of years. This year for several reasons we didn't go to Texas. I missed her variety of music. Will piano stay in tune in travel and changing temperature.

1 minute ago, SWharton said:

What about the weight??? Buy a keyboard.

A good question

Clay

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5 minutes ago, SWharton said:

What about the weight??? Buy a keyboard.

Keyboard's not as sexy, though.  Why not live large?

I did a quick search, and upright pianos (and smaller equivalents) range from 200-500lbs.  It's just a couple feet off of where the toy is supposed to sit (toy hauler section), so it's kind of designed for it.  I guess it's adding the weight specifically to the forward resting point, maybe that's a problem - I don't know enough about the trailer's limitations.

As for tuning - I guess I'd want to have it re-tuned upon relocation.  Luckily, I plan to stay in each location for a while.  (Months.)

I'm not committed to this - but it seems achievable, and I find the idea very attractive.

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There are a lot of advantages to a keyboard.

  1. Portability.   You can always bring it outside!  Not so easy with a piano.
  2. Usability.  Any modern keyboard would support headphones.  I'll bet they have bluetooth, too, so you could even hook into your rig's stereo, if applicable.
  3. Cost.   Generally speaking, an electronic keyboard is very affordable.  Not to mention the reduction in fuel usage to tow an upright.
    Doing a quick search, I came across this:
    https://www.guitarcenter.com/Carry-On/88-Key-Folding-Piano-and-MIDI-Controller-1500000333372.gc
    The wife gave up her big keyboard when we went full-time a year ago.  I'm pretty sure we're going to buy this for her.  (Glad you posted this so I had a chance to find out about that.)
Edited by Will B.
Removed redudant link. (Both had the video.)
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Problems with putting it on either end of the trailer is the pitching from the bumps. Right over the axels is the best place as it's the smoothest ride. I can keep most anything sitting on my counter in the kitchen, not so in the bedroom or garage each on the ends of my trailer. I have Air ride axels and an air ride truck. 

Rod

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Another point on the tuning:  It wouldn't just be the vibrations of road travel.  It would also be, more likely, the fact that an RV isn't well insulated.  You're basically "outside".  Humidity, heat, cold, changing altitudes ... those would all cause that piano to have be re-tuned constantly.

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IYQ carried a piano in his bumper pull trailer located in the middle where his couch used to be. We never discussed tuning it, though. My Dave bought a keyboard and stand and we still have it. I appreciate him using the headset when he is practicing a new song. :)

Linda

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Another vote for the keyboard......if the "opportunity" (invitation?) arises....you can take the keyboard over to a clubhouse (or?) at a campground.......and other musicians (if there are any) can join in!

IIRC - Henry (phoenix) over on the HDT forums does something like that at the HDT rallies.

😉

On edit : due to the weight (etc.) of a "real" piano, IMO it's a "design for disaster" in an RV, whether enclosed or not.  Think I would ask Henry for his opinion/s of the plan.

Best of luck with whichever 88 you choose.

 

 

 

Edited by Pappy Yokum
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You can get some pretty good electric pianos with weighted keys etc that mimic a piano well except have the benefits of less weight and size, no tuning, and ability to play with headphones should you desire.  The Yamaha we had also had a few other voices (electric piano, organ, and a couple piano versions) for fun.  Can’t imagine any benefits from carrying a real upright unless you just need lots of ballast. 

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I know many people whose ears are trained enough to tell the difference between a grand piano, baby grand piano and upright piano just from listening to a recording.  Some can even guess the brand name.  An electronic keyboard might not cut it for some of them, but others will accept the compromises, just like they accept that they do not have room at home for a grand piano. 

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I play the piano and also tune them. Anything can be made to fly if you throw enough money at it. IF I were to want to do this, I'd think long and hard about securing it so that it can't go traveling by itself. Keeping it in tune will be a constant challenge. My suggestion is that, if you want to take a real piano along, is that you learn to tune yourself. Not really all that difficult. You will have to decide how often you will need to tune it. I'd wait a few days after landing before any tuning.

An electronic keyboard is probably, overall, a much better choice. No tuning issues and MUCH less weight. Also, should you so desire, you can take it outside. Before we hit the road we had a small keyboard, more for fun than real concert-type playing. Once a year our church did "Church in the Park" (church service followed by potluck dinner) and we'd bring our keyboard.

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We had he same question.  Ended up getting a Yamaha Clavinova cvp-585. This has been the perfect solution.  Been riding in the back of our 5th wheel for over 5 years with no issues.  She plays it with headphones so no noise to neighbors.  No environmental issues whatsoever.

https://usa.yamaha.com/products/musical_instruments/pianos/clavinova/clp-585/index.html

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On 3/31/2021 at 7:47 AM, Bill Joyce said:

I know many people whose ears are trained enough to tell the difference between a grand piano, baby grand piano and upright piano just from listening to a recording.  Some can even guess the brand name.  An electronic keyboard might not cut it for some of them, but others will accept the compromises, just like they accept that they do not have room at home for a grand piano. 

Would guess those folks with "trained ears" (which might include the OP) will certainly be able to tell when the upright in the trailer is out of tune after a trip down a poorly maintained road, LOL.

.

 

 

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  • 5 weeks later...

I agree with the advice - digital is more practical in every way if you're willing to compromise, and 99% of people probably should - and if I get one, I probably will.

Still, there's something uniquely awesome about pulling up with a real piano in front and dropping the toy hauler door to play.  :)

 

On 3/31/2021 at 8:04 AM, kb0zke said:

...learn to tune yourself. Not really all that difficult.

It's good that at least one person thinks that's achievable.  Otherwise, I would have defaulted to assume it's too far outside my skillset (or work ethic) to consider.

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41 minutes ago, odigity said:

It's good that at least one person thinks that's achievable. 

I would never say that it was impossible as pretty much anything is, if you want it badly enough and are willing to do what is necessary. In this case it probably means learning to tune the piano. There is one other concern that I would have and that is the effect of the widely varying humidity levels of travel on the soundboard. We moved a piano from WY to TX back in 1989 and within a few months the soundboard cracked from the big change in humidity. It was a pretty expensive proposition to get it repaired. 

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On 3/28/2021 at 10:17 AM, odigity said:

For context, those bunks are on the right side of this ramp section.

(I don't intend to carry a toy.  Gonna use that space for my Soloflex.)

trailer-ramp.jpg

A piano in the very nose is going to add a lot of tongue weight to the trailer, that may affect your pull vehicle. Until you get the trailer and can do weight calculations, you probably will be better off planning for a lighter keyboard. You will also get a lot of up and down movement in that area. Noise level may or may not be an issue but the humidity changes will be. Do you plan to remove the piano when not using the trailer? The summer heat can get pretty warm inside if you are not keeping the AC on even in storage. 

What was the payload capacity of the trailer you are buying?  

Edited by Star Dreamer
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