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Bobtail mileage


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I'm contemplating a several hundred mile trip to get a trailer with my VNL. I rarely go very far w/o the whole rig, anybody got a WAG on what mileage they see? I realize every truck is different, but a difference between BT & towing a trailer will get me in the ballpark to see if I should pay a transporter instead.

(BTW, boat on trailer from Orlando to Balt)

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Almost no difference.....

Our toybox is under 10k And our Morgan Cargo box stands at 12'-2" so we have a built in headwind in normal wind conditions..... 

I flight plan @ 10 mpg but have seen as low as 7 and high as 13.5 with a big tail wind.

Cummins has a nice chapter on their website regarding the aero-effects of trucks and various factors pertaining to milage and improvements that can be obtained.....

Drive on.....(tail, cross, head.... Winds)

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Jim, my Dodge 1 ton was getting 12-14 towing, 18-22 normal driving.

Our Volvo seems to be doing 9-10 towing so far, but the slight decrease in mileage is more then paid for with the confidence I have in towing with the 780.

Thank you again for sharing the HDT lifestyle with my wife and I, we will for ever be grateful.

 

Michael and Licia

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What we are seeing is that every truck was set up different.... rear gear, transmissions, power/torque, overall weight,  length, design- condo/mid roof/low roof, the design of the 5'er rear- how much drag does it create?  If we swapped around trucks, we would see a difference in mileage just on driver behavior/input.  How hard do you smash the skinny pedal from a light? East coast flat highway- Florida style with concrete will have better mileage than midwest "flat" that you may be on a slight incline and not realize it.  Another item of difference is the tires.  Some are a highway long distance tire with very low rolling resistance, some are more regional made for hard turns and scrubbing, some may be better on dirt/gravel.  Also the road surface... whats the tension of the surface?  Hot asphalt in the summer gives a higher rolling resistance that perfect smooth concrete.  

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7.0 to 8.9 towing at about 62-65 mph depending on speed and terrain (climbing mountains or constantly increasing elevation on a hot day with radiator fan cutting in and out with A/C on = 6 to 6.5 ).  Overall average is usually 8 mpg.  Bobtail improves about 2-4 MPG with same terrain variables - but I run faster bobtail which subtracts from the economy increase and makes it more like an average of 10 mpg average bobtail.  D12D engine 10 speed Meritor, singled.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Let's throw this into the mix. Because I bobtail pushing 20,000 miles a year, I have seen variations that defy logic. For one thing, although I have a real time mpg readout on the instrument panel ,and mine is fairly accurate, the only way to get it right is to fill up and get the calculator out. Rarely does anyone here bobtail enough to get those quality numbers. 

The percentage of bio diesel in a given load of fuel seems to make a big difference. One load of fuel might have none, and the next has 20%, the resulting BTU decline has to make a difference. And of course there is no way of knowing what is going in. Even temperatures of the fuel coming out of the storage tanks between fills can wreck the numbers, so called "hot fuel". which Canadian pumps compensate for by law, but US pumps do not. 

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37 minutes ago, beyerjf said:

Let's throw this into the mix. Because I bobtail pushing 20,000 miles a year, I have seen variations that defy logic. For one thing, although I have a real time mpg readout on the instrument panel ,and mine is fairly accurate, the only way to get it right is to fill up and get the calculator out. Rarely does anyone here bobtail enough to get those quality numbers. 

The percentage of bio diesel in a given load of fuel seems to make a big difference. One load of fuel might have none, and the next has 20%, the resulting BTU decline has to make a difference. And of course there is no way of knowing what is going in. Even temperatures of the fuel coming out of the storage tanks between fills can wreck the numbers, so called "hot fuel". which Canadian pumps compensate for by law, but US pumps do not. 

When we left North Dakota on Nov 1, all the fuel at the pumps was either No1 or a "Treated" winter blend.  Our bobtail mileage dropped a little, our towing mile dropped greatly.  

Glad to be in warmer territory!

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