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How many tools to keep?


lockmup68
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OK, probably really dumb question, but having a moment today. We are about six weeks out from the estate sale. Going through all the tools, this is way harder than I imagined. Collecting tools for everything over the last 35 years, now what to keep and what to sell. Is two sets of 1/2, 3/8 in standard and metric too much? I have all kinds of air tools also, but thinking a 1/2 cordless impact and an 18v drill and mini impact will cover most of those?

 

the new tool box area is just an open box (no shelves or drawers right now): 72" long, x 26" deep x 35" high as new tool box. I went to harbor freight over the holidays and bought a bunch of tool bags. I have a small bag with the open ends, a small bag for all screw drivers, a larger bag for hammers, pry bars, monkey wrenches, etc.; a small bag for pliers, vice grips, dykes, strippers, etc; I will have a longer bag for a hack saw, long pry bar, longer stuff; and one bag for sockets: 1/2, 3/8, and 1/4 standard and metric. I have small general sets to keep in the trailer and car.

 

Sawzall? Worm drive skill saw? Dremel, air tools: 1/2" impacts, 3/8" rachets, 3/8 impact, angle, drill, hammer, etc.

 

I think I'll have enough room to keep the midi lathe and associated tools for turning. I still want to do that and it's pretty easy to pull out and I'm thinking of a sliding mount for the truck.

 

I basically had 4+ sets of everything and I'm culling out all but the best stuff and making sure I have full sets of the stuff I'm keeping.

 

What about a floor jack? Jack stands?

 

Non drink water hoses? How long do I need to keep?

 

What else do you wish you kept or ended up buying with HDT and 5th?

 

Thanks,

Shannon

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Gosh, I like your collection. I carry 6 ton jack stands and a 20 and 12 ton bottle jack ( low profile). Make sure you save enough room for a few short lengths of 2 X 12 and 4x4 for bases. Never saw a need to carry a floor jack. I carry a 1/2" electric impact with sockets and extensions, drill with bits, 1/4 3/8 1/2 metric and standard socket sets, ratchet end wrenches metric and standard, as well as pliers screw drivers, diagonals Etc. Probably one set of each is adequate. BTW small chain saw, ax, and bow saw will come in handy as well as jig and skil saw. May also want to consider pole saw to trim low hanging branches and extendable ladder of some type. I have a roll up 25 foot and a coiled 50 foot water hose for general use with spray and extensions. Also be sure you have plenty of extension cords.

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I would certainly keep the jackstands and floor jack. Simply for safety when you need to crawl under the RV or truck. Find a place for a few good blocks as well.

 

I would also keep the 1/2" air impact. Cordless just don't compare, IME. My 18V Dewalt is pathetic compared to the Ingersol Rand 1/2". Sawzall is multipurpose.

 

1 set of deepwell and regular sockets, Metric and english in 1/2 and 3/8. 1 set of deepwell 1/2" impact sockets. Same way for box end--1 set each metric and English....maybe an extra set ratcheting.

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I would also keep the 1/2" air impact. Cordless just don't compare, IME. My 18V Dewalt is pathetic compared to the Ingersol Rand 1/2". Sawzall is multipurpose.

 

 

Get a real 1/2" cordless impact from Snap-on. Cost a bunch, but there is no comaprison to a dewalt type impact. I have 3 air impacts, so will keep one just in case. Can always sell later.

 

Thanks for the confirmation and jackstands, jacks, blocks, and boards. I tend to overdo and overbuild everything, so this makes me feel better. Now to figure out how to get it all on the truck....

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If your wallet can stand the shock, get a Milwaukee M18 Fuel 1/2" impact. Highest torque of any 1/2" air or electric. Did I mention it's pricey? And heavy, but no hose to drag around. I also have a little wimpy Hitachi 1/2" impact, which is small and light. Very handy for tight places if you are working with smaller fasteners.

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Shannon Not a easy answer.. for those of us that fix....almost everything. One way to look at is.... where or how much space (shop) will I have to work in ? Now in a drive in shop... air compressor, press, table saw, torch, sandblaster box, jacks, tire changer and ect. (you get the idea) you need a lot space to do whatever. On the other hand....moving around every month or two, on the road repairs get a little more selective of what you want to get into. So look at it this way.. Have on hand the tools that you can use to do the easier fixes. Battery drills or 1/2 impact, .sockets, drivers, players, skill saw, oil change tools, meters, tire air gage, players, jumper cables, and ect. What you have room for and can use. Most of the common items...nuts bolts, hoses, tape, water, lubes, ect. You can find them at most auto/ hardware stores. A few on hand OK... a trunk full .....only if you have the room. When on the road a I don't have the tool I need...I go and purchase one and leave it in the TC. Battery chargers are loaded all the time, for drills and house battery's......just in case. I've seen people with radial arm saws, drill presses, welders.... I don't mind doing a repair...but I'm not on the road to work...... Pack the tools that make you the most comfortable with. I'm still tying fish hooks fly's and using them. Don't need much room. GONE FISHING>>> B) OU812

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Our 20 ft cargo box tends to collect too much "treasure" on some trips but what really works well for jacking the various trailers we pull is 3 ton floor Jack and a 1" X 12" X 36" plank of plywood to allow soft soil or gravel Jack operations .

 

We travel a lot of narrow and twisty secondary roads and the floor Jack allows a fast tire change in a less than level tilted ditch shoulder without having to get under the rig to Jack with a bottle Jack.....not a NASCAR pit stop but faster the better is safer when the road is narrow.

 

Sounds weird but I just store the Jack on dear the rear axle of the Samuria with a few hundred pounds of pressure applied to the axle and then wen I need the Jack quickly I simply roll up the cargo box back door and release the Jack pressure and proceed with the pit stop.....it's a fast and secure way to make the Jack ready for fast action when time matters....

 

Get the best Jack you can find.....quality matters with jacks....

 

Drive on.......(jacks matter in pit stops)

Edited by Dollytrolley
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When I went from a shop mechanic to field service I put the most used 10% of my hand tools in a tote tray along with a HD vinal wrench roll, 1/4 thru 1 1/8 inch combination wrenches 1/4 sockets and drivers in a small metal box, 3/8 6pt deep sockets 1/4 thru 1 inch with long and short ratchets and extensions, a handful of screw drivers, pliers, dikes, vise grips, stripper/crimper and other go to tools that would do 95% of the normal stuff then I repurposed my road chest top box to handle the 90% of the tools that are need to supplement the standard tools to do 98% of the rest of the normal field type repairs. You will still run into stuff that you aren't equipped to handle , that's why we have cell phones and supply houses. I still like to keep a basic tool kit in a tray/ammo box/carry box for to go situations.

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  • 7 months later...

Rather than start a new topic, I'm piggybacking onto this one.  Labor Day weekend I had some small chores to do on my Volvo 730.  Front shocks, (nope still not done) and I wanted to locate and unplug the 2 NOX sensors checking for water.  I will need to crawl under the truck for the rusted bolts and various inspections, greasings, etc.

I own a 3 ton floor jack that's very handy but nearly useless for an HDT except as described by DollyTrolly.  Good reason to keep it IMO.  I remembered reading here that jack stands are mandatory.  I'm in full agreement.  

Now I am faced with buying a 10 or 20 ton jack and matching stands.  And I'm trying to downsize!  I don't want to spend $200-$400 for big heavy tools.  Is there a better way?  

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Carry what you have room for and get rid of the things that don't get used often. I have been on the road for 8 years and have never had a use for jack stands, floor jack or a chainsaw. Decide how much heavy work you intend to do. I have a 12 ton bottle jack and if that don't do it I go rent something. I carry a 24 volt cordless drill and saw just because I had it and it has done most anything I have needed since on the road.

I carry the axe and a pole saw.  They built Harbor Freight for single use or very seldom used items. Plus you would be amazed at what other people around you are carrying.

 

Brad 

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I'm pretty partial to a quality shorty 12 T bottle jack and a wire milk carton full of 3x3x12 oak blocking to build a mini crib with plus a 6x8x16 hard wood block. the shorty jack fits under the steer axle with minimal hassle and the 3x3s are low enuf to bi

build a mini ramp that u can drive up on to gain jack clearance if necessary

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Quote

n full of 3x3x12 oak blocking to build a mini crib with plus a 6x8x16 hard wood block. the shorty jack fits under the steer axle with minimal hassle

Quote

12 ton bottle jack and if that don't do it I go rent something. I carry a 24 volt cordless drill and saw just because I had it and it has done most anything I have needed since on the road.

Quote

railroad tie cut up in to 2 foot sections.       

Let someone else do the heavy stuff.....

The other answer is with the front up on 2- 2x8's

Thank you folks for the good suggestions.  I thought I was wasting brain cells thinking about planks, logs, or whatever.  I will definitely find some way to use these ideas.  I especially like the portability of these suggestions.

I also plan to keep the pole saw, but haven't decided whether to keep the welder and plasma cutter or not.  The table saw has got to go.   😏

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1 hour ago, MoSKP9 said:

I have found that a tap and die set for sae and metric is invaluable . It is something that is hard to find on the road.

Good idea, these would be valuable in certain situations.  and they aren't large.

Many of us have built in compressed air.  Certain high end steel flatbeds have built in compressors.  I don't see much about pneumatic tools here.  Maybe because when I picked up a large impact in Hasbro-Fright I knew I didn't want one?   Any reason to keep pneumatic tools?  As has been posted here, it might be worth a service call to not own any?  

Once upon a time I thought I would keep my Kennedy rollaway, but now having second thoughts.  It's very heavy and I don't need a whole drawer of wood chisels anymore, etc. etc.

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3 hours ago, MoSKP9 said:

I have found that a tap and die set for sae and metric is invaluable . It is something that is hard to find on the road.

 

1 hour ago, Sculptor said:

Good idea, these would be valuable in certain situations.  and they aren't large.

Many of us have built in compressed air.  Certain high end steel flatbeds have built in compressors.  I don't see much about pneumatic tools here.  Maybe because when I picked up a large impact in Hasbro-Fright I knew I didn't want one?   Any reason to keep pneumatic tools?  As has been posted here, it might be worth a service call to not own any?  

Once upon a time I thought I would keep my Kennedy rollaway, but now having second thoughts.  It's very heavy and I don't need a whole drawer of wood chisels anymore, etc. etc.

Taps and dies are a good idea, regarding they aren't large is subjective, I have a 6 drawer Vidmar cabinet full of taps and dies.     Be careful when buying, carbon taps don't last long, HSS is worth the extra cost IMHO.

 

As far as air tools,  most trucks compressors are not designed to supply the volume of air needed and, air tools are the most inefficient power tools around.     For tight spaces or environmental situations air tools have their place, not many come to mind on an RV.   

 

Steve   

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