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I never knew diesels were such a pain


slackercruster

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We’ve had a diesel Class A for 15 years.  Not really a problem.  We had a fuel filter clog and it was fixed by installing a second filter after the fuel-water separator.  We also only buy diesel at places that turn over their inventory frequently, so either truck stops or grocery stores that we see have good usage of their diesel pumps.  Lots of myths out there.

Barb & Dave O'Keeffe
2002 Alpine 36 MDDS (Figment II), 2018 Ford C-Max HYBRID
Blog: http://www.barbanddave.net
SPK# 90761 FMCA #F337834

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slackercruster, talk personally to car or truck diesel owners. Driven a diesel since 1988. That was a work truck at the telephone company that at about 300 miles the "water in fuel light" came on. The utility body upfitter left the bare chassis out in the lot and it rained. Of course they all ready had the cap and fuel filler hose off. Never again a problem. Bought a 1995 Ram Cummins, put 147,000 on it before selling. Now have a 2003 Ram dually Cummins with 259,000 on the clock.

 

 

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1 hour ago, slackercruster said:

I was thinking about getting a diesel pickup one day. But sounds like they are not as reliable as gas engines.

I have owned a diesel car and now own my second diesel truck. I have also owned many gasoline cars and a couple of trucks as well as two class A motorhomes. In either case the reliability is pretty comparable. If you do the maintenance as called for they will be reliable but if you do not, either one will soon become unreliable. Diesel fuel filters should be changed annually or as often as the owner's manual calls for. I have always replaced the fuel filters at least annually and have never experienced a fuel filter related problem. 

EDIT: I should add that failure to replace the fuel filters in gasoline powered vehicles will also cause the same types of problems. 

Edited by Kirk W

Good travelin !...............Kirk

Full-time 11+ years...... Now seasonal travelers.
Kirk & Pam's Great RV Adventure

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We tow with a 2017 F-350 dually diesel - 6.7 L dual turbo.  So far (65,000 miles) no problem with fuel.  We have it serviced regularly.  It is a great vehicle.  Way more power than gas counterpart and better mileage.  Maintenance is somewhat more expensive than gas. 

Jinx and Wayne

2006 Carriage Carri-Lite 36KSQ

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Follow maintenance schedule and it will be a better engine (diesel).  They have great torque (towing capacity) and handle heavy loads better.  I've had both in trucks/cars, diesels out-perform every time, BUT, if you don't follow good maintenance routines diesels can cost one heck of a lot more to repair.  Regular maintenance is a little higher but worth it in performance.  For general everyday driving, stick to gas.  I've not had a motor-home so can't comment on that aspect.  Have not had problems caused by filters in my 45 years of driving them, only caused by lazy maintenance.

2002 Fifth Avenue RV (RIP) 2015 Ram 3500 Mega-cab DRW(38k miles), 6.7L Cummins Diesel, A668RFE, 3.73, 14,000 GVWR, 5,630 Payload, 27,300 GCWR, 18,460 Max Trailer Weight Rating(For Sale) , living in the frigid north, ND.

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Got rid of my 2012 Duramax. Stayed way to much in shop over emissions failure. But I also understand they got better later. This is why I have an older HDT. Only egr and it disabled.

2003 Teton Grand Freedom towed with 2006 Freightliner Century 120 across the beautiful USA welding pipe.https://photos.app.goo.gl/O32ZjgzSzgK7LAyt1

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34 minutes ago, slackercruster said:

Some of the people in the other thread said the filter was clogged up with debris that looked like coffee grounds.

I don't know where they are buying fuel as that is news to me. Diesel is more oily and doesn't evaporate as quickly as gasoline and if you buy fuel in little, out of the way stations that don't sell much fuel it could be more dirty, but that would also be more likely for gasoline from them. Don't believe the antidotal stories that people tell. If you still think that such stories might be true, go to a major shop and talk to the mechanics there. 

Good travelin !...............Kirk

Full-time 11+ years...... Now seasonal travelers.
Kirk & Pam's Great RV Adventure

            images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQqFswi_bvvojaMvanTWAI

 

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I've read somewhere (or heard, maybe "The Car Show" brothers Click & Clack) that when fuel stations are refueled, the incoming fuel stirs up the tank and any debris in the tank can be stirred up into solution - and if you happen to be pumping at that time - well, it goes into your tank.

And yes, when I see that big re-supply tanker truck filling the station, I avoid refilling.

 

 

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~Rich

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Fuel is mostly a non issue. Regular filter change and you good. Now it sit for year or so, algae can grow and cause you an expensive repair. My problem was DEF related. 

2003 Teton Grand Freedom towed with 2006 Freightliner Century 120 across the beautiful USA welding pipe.https://photos.app.goo.gl/O32ZjgzSzgK7LAyt1

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Diesels require clean fuel and clean oil.  The biggest issue with diesels sis coming from the emission controls. A diesel needs to be worked and not babied around town.

Ken

Amateur radio operator, 2023 Cougar 22MLS, 2022 F150 Lariat 4x4 Off Road, Sport trim <br />Travel with 1 miniature schnauzer, 1 standard schnauzer and one African Gray parrot

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Gas station fuel pumps usually have pre-delivery filters.  If not in the hose it will be internal in the pump housing so i doubt any debris will be pumped into your tank.

 

The biggest problem with my 300 Cat is that when the temps get down to 32F the motor gets slow to start and when it gets to -25F it is impossible to start without the block heater being plugged in for a few hours.

2004 Freightliner m2 106  2015 DRV lx450 Fullhouse  2019 Indian Springfield 2014 Yamaha 950 V-Star

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5 hours ago, slackercruster said:

 

Thanks for the feedback.

That diesel fuel must be filthy. Some of the people in the other thread said the filter was clogged up with debris that looked like coffee grounds. And water in diesel was mentioned as well.

I've never changed a gas filter in any of my vehicles, but maybe I should. 

Don't you do fluids and filters changes when needed on all vehicles?   Usually part of a decent toil change at reliable  places, those that not needed very few months will be checked while vehicle is getting serviced.

Barb & Dave O'Keeffe
2002 Alpine 36 MDDS (Figment II), 2018 Ford C-Max HYBRID
Blog: http://www.barbanddave.net
SPK# 90761 FMCA #F337834

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8 hours ago, TXiceman said:

 A diesel needs to be worked and not babied around town.

I think so too. A cousin of my wife ran a company that required A LOT of travel in a years time. He had Ford diesel trucks for hauling the trailers needed for the jobs and a Mercedes diesel car to drive himself. The trucks averaged over 200,000 miles a year and got new ones every year. The Mercedes when he retired it for a newer model had over 1,000,000 miles. All he ever did was change the oil and filters, change the fuel filters, get new tires and batteries, and ALWAYS buy fuel at high volume stations. 

His is a philosophy I use for my own truck. If we are not pulling we use the car and once every so often if not pulling we take the truck on a road trip of a 100 miles or so to keep the cobwebs out. I always keep a spare fuel filter in the truck just in case I do end up with cruddy fuel but I have never used them yet outside of the regular change. I do not change the oil on a regular mileage schedule but I do change it when it says I need to. 

My two cents but for pulling a 40' fifth wheel I will take a diesel over gas any day. 

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2 hours ago, Chalkie said:

pulling a 40' fifth wheel I will take a diesel over gas any day.

Chalkie is right.  So long as you are willing to pay a higher initial cost, and higher costs for fuel and maintenance, a diesel is hard to beat.  The pulling power and smooth running muscle is amazing.

Jinx and Wayne

2006 Carriage Carri-Lite 36KSQ

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Beware of blanket statements like "diesels make more torque" and "diesels are cheaper to run".  while sometimes true, such statements are often misleading, or downright false.

If you're not towing or hauling heavy loads, why spend thousands of $ to save hundreds of $ (fuel)?  When I bought my HDT, it allowed me to downsize my daily work truck to a F-150 EcoBoost.  More power and torque than the half ton diesels, and cheaper too.  And remember it's not just peak torque that keeps you going up the hill, but thw area under that toque curve.  A big torque number that only registers over a couple hundred rpm (or less), won't atay with a motor that might make a little lower peak, but spreads it over a wider rpm band.

And yes, the average care and feeding of a diesel is significantly more costly than a gasoline motor.  You play, you pay.

If you WANT a diesel just admit it and be happy.  But most folks don't NEED a diesel.

KW T-680, POPEMOBILE
Newmar X-Aire, VATICAN
Lots of old motorcycles, Moto Guzzi Griso and Spyder F3 currently in the front row
Young enough to play in the dirt as a retired farmer.
contact me at rickeieio@yahoo.com

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Yes it is.  Both my hdt's are diesel.  And my last 12 pickups have been gasoline.  I don't pull or haul a lot with my pickups, just me and my tool box, perhaps a passenger or three.   I don't work a pickup hard enough to ever reap any benefit of paying up for a diesel. YMMV.

My point it, diesels MAY have more peak torque, but at a price, and for most of us they simply don't pay.

Are there gasoline powered trucks that could pull our rv?  Sure, for a while.  But they're in smaller trucks which won't safely handle it going through mountains or in the event of a brake malfunction.  Thus my choice to buy a bigger truck.

KW T-680, POPEMOBILE
Newmar X-Aire, VATICAN
Lots of old motorcycles, Moto Guzzi Griso and Spyder F3 currently in the front row
Young enough to play in the dirt as a retired farmer.
contact me at rickeieio@yahoo.com

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17 minutes ago, rickeieio said:

My point it, diesels MAY have more peak torque, but at a price, and for most of us they simply don't pay.

I like your evaluation. I now have a diesel truck that I really enjoy using to tow my RV but I don't need one. I have owned 2 class A's and both were gasoline powered and if I had it to do over, I would still buy them with gasoline engines again.

The original question was about fuel issues however and that is now a significant problem with either type of engine if you do the necessary maintenance in a timely manner. 

Edited by Kirk W

Good travelin !...............Kirk

Full-time 11+ years...... Now seasonal travelers.
Kirk & Pam's Great RV Adventure

            images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQqFswi_bvvojaMvanTWAI

 

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2 hours ago, Kirk W said:

I like your evaluation. I now have a diesel truck that I really enjoy using to tow my RV but I don't need one. I have owned 2 class A's and both were gasoline powered and if I had it to do over, I would still buy them with gasoline engines again.

The original question was about fuel issues however and that is now a significant problem with either type of engine if you do the necessary maintenance in a timely manner. 

Thank you for gently guiding us back on topic.

KW T-680, POPEMOBILE
Newmar X-Aire, VATICAN
Lots of old motorcycles, Moto Guzzi Griso and Spyder F3 currently in the front row
Young enough to play in the dirt as a retired farmer.
contact me at rickeieio@yahoo.com

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29 minutes ago, Rich&Sylvia said:

And then why have fuel filters in vehicles?

 

To keep the junk in your own tank from getting into the system, especially the stuff that develops in diesel fuels.

2004 Freightliner m2 106  2015 DRV lx450 Fullhouse  2019 Indian Springfield 2014 Yamaha 950 V-Star

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