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2 or 3 axles on a toy hauler?


Pambe83
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I'm looking at a Momentum 380th. Looks like it has two options. 3X7000 lbs axles or 2X8000 axles. GVWR is 19500 lbs with a 3500 lb pin weight. I will add Goodyear G114 17.5" H rated tires if it doesn't come with them. It also has 12" I-beam frame. Trailer length is 42' 2".

 

I would prefer two axles. Am I asking for trouble?

 

Thanks in advance for any help.

 

Red

Edited by Pambe83
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My personal choice would be three 8K axles with hydraulic disc brakes and Mor/Ryde IS suspension. That is a common configuration on the heavy high end 5ers. You might be surprised how easy it is to overload a rig, especially a toy hauler. There are some things you almost can't have too much of; truck, brakes, suspension, tires(the GY G114s are a good choice by the way) and of course, money!! If three 8Ks aren't an option then go with the three 7Ks and ask if you can upgrade to disc brakes and the IS suspension. Best wishes, Jay

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My Teton is 3 axles and it is a pleasure to tow. Yes, there is greater roll resistance with more rubber on ground so you will burn more fuel. You will have much more caring capacity. I also do not find a disadvantage in backing a 3 axle trailer. We also are considering upgrading to IS so take soon good advise here and get it now. God bless and Happy new year

Edited by Glenn West
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The 3 - 7000# will be more than adequate with 16" G rated tires. If you can, get the disc brakes and Mor/Ryde IS suspension. If no disc brakes, get the 3-1/8" wide heavy duty drum brakes instead of the 2" wide brake shoes.

 

Our 19,000# GVWR HitchHiker has the 3 - 7000# Mor/Ryde IS with 3-1/8" wide brakes and tows well. We have G rated Hankook tires on it.

 

I would be concerned about a 12" frame on a 42' long trailer. Our HitchHiker has a 14" frame.

 

Ken

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Thanks for the responses, every little bit helps.

 

The Momentum comes with a 3 yr warranty on the frame instead of the common 1 yr. The manufacturer said they aren't having any issues with 2 axle system. I've been told to stay away from 3 axles if you can to avoid tire issues. What I didn't know to ask at the time was if the person was running the China bombs.....I will have a GY tire on mine when I head out.

 

I'm pulling with a Chevy HD 3500 4X4. Still have a reserve left when pulling this trailer.

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3 axle trailers do not mean tire problems. I don't know what clown came up with that urban myth. Personally on a large trailer, I'd prefer 3 axles over two. You distribute the load over the length of the frame better....You have more brakes and have more tire surface on the ground.

 

Yes, there is a bit more tire scrubbing when you turn sharply, but how much of the time do you turn that sharply? The scrubbing will not have you wearing out the tires and replacing them any sooner.

 

With any tire, you need to maintain tire pressure in the proper range to insure the longevity of the tire and to carry the load.

 

ken

Edited by TXiceman
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  • 1 month later...

You wont be sorry! My 5er came with 2 7K axles and I kind of wanted it that way for less maintenance, less tire scrubbing and less hassle by the law here in CA. Even though it ran within ratings of the axles and tires, it just wasn't all that stable or stop great.

 

I added a third axle about a year and a half ago and it made a HUGE difference in stability and stopping. I try not to take tight turns and when I have to u-turn at the shop, I hose the pavement down to help with sliding the tires.

 

The only way I would ever own another trailer this heavy with 2 axles is if they were dual wheel axles.

Edited by CrazyCooter
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We owned a Raptor 3 axle toyhauler and pulled it over 110,000 miles before we sold it. While there is the safety feature of 3 axles there is another major problem. The third axle, furtherst to the rear, scrubs the tire everytime you make a turn. Over a SHORT period of time this tears the tire apart internally. We have 11 tires failures, Maxxis E rated, over the 110,000 miles. Got to the point of running my hands over the rear tires EVERYTIME we stopped. I caught every failure before a blow-out thus no body damage but started carrying two spares as we did have trips where we had two failures on a single trip. Finally changed out to 16" rims so I could run LT tires. Sold the toyhualer shortly afterwards so don't know how the change would have preformed over time. I recommend two axles and would never own 3 axles again. At a minimun make sure you have 16" rims so you can run LT tires. Trailers tires for the most part are Junk. JMHO!

 

rocmoc n AZ/Mexico

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I disagree on the three axle issues.

 

We have been fulltimers in 3 axles for 15 years. And with heavy trailers. The issue is NOT the three axles. The issue is poor tires.

 

While it is true that tires will scrub some - even two axles do that - it is not to the point of "destroying" tires. In fact, we show no additional wear on either the front axle tires or the rear axle tires. We do rotate tires every year or so. And our tires typically "age out" before we replace them due to a wear.

 

One thing for sure, though. Many trailer tires ARE junk.

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Humbly disagree. If three axles were better you would see them on commercial or equipment trailers. Everytime we made a turn a black mark would be left on the pavement from the shearing of the forces on the rear tires. BUT at least we agree trailer tires are junk!

 

rocmoc n AZ/Mexico

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Currently at a Race and most if not all large race hauler trailers are 3 axle. Ones on gooseneck and Semi type. It's the Tires and loading and press that makes the diff.

 

Axle allignment also plays a huge part. It the camber or toe is out you can ruin a tire on any axle in a few thousand miles. Seen it myself

 

My trailer currently has 2 8k axles but I would go three with no issue. Cost of tires goes up though at 6 each time. ?

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  • 6 years later...

We now own a 2017 per owned LM 365 Arlington after a Everest for years, but I just found out a few months ago that the frame is bent going upwards into the coach.

I have been looking for a frame shop to pull it back down to spec then I would think to sister weld plate to hold it in place.  but with no luck. 

It was suggested to me about adding a third axle, I still want pulled down ..one company said about the overhang of these coaches causing the back end bouncing. Also told they can not get the equipment over the top of I beam for a pull down as the floor is screwed down to I beam. 

What do you reckon?

Den. 

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8 hours ago, 14ukden&bev said:

We now own a 2017 per owned LM 365 Arlington after a Everest for years, but I just found out a few months ago that the frame is bent going upwards into the coach.

I have been looking for a frame shop to pull it back down to spec then I would think to sister weld plate to hold it in place.  but with no luck. 

It was suggested to me about adding a third axle, I still want pulled down ..one company said about the overhang of these coaches causing the back end bouncing. Also told they can not get the equipment over the top of I beam for a pull down as the floor is screwed down to I beam. 

What do you reckon?

Den. 

Assuming the rear part is bent up, the only way I can think of as to why the frame is bent upwards would be because the rear end was dragged so badly in bent the frame. If the side wall panels are not affected (not sure how they could not be) then I probably would try to fix it.  I would think you would do more damage or have to rebuild the whole rear of the trailer to even be able to try to straighten it out. If it is bad enough, then really it is just cheaper to buy a new trailer. If it bent once, what would prevent it from bending in another spot if the frame is that weak?

You could try a place that works on semi trailers to see if they have any equipment to to it. 

Is it a Lippert Frame?

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  • 1 month later...

As a former OTR O/O, tri axles are for weight carry capacity but more so to provide a properly engineered trailer to have the braking capacity for that weight. Electric (magnet) brakes do not have sufficient braking with 2 axles for increased weight. Converting to electric actuated hydraulic brakes will provide greater braking. 

When considering the tires you will replace with 3 axles rotating on middle axle the upfront cost will save you maitenence and downtime cost.

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  • 3 months later...
On 5/12/2021 at 12:56 AM, Star Dreamer said:

Assuming the rear part is bent up, the only way I can think of as to why the frame is bent upwards would be because the rear end was dragged so badly in bent the frame. If the side wall panels are not affected (not sure how they could not be) then I probably would try to fix it.  I would think you would do more damage or have to rebuild the whole rear of the trailer to even be able to try to straighten it out. If it is bad enough, then really it is just cheaper to buy a new trailer. If it bent once, what would prevent it from bending in another spot if the frame is that weak?

You could try a place that works on semi trailers to see if they have any equipment to to it. 

Is it a Lippert Frame?

Sir sorry for the delay.

The frame is a LCI and there is a 3/4"+ (I have done the string test) going up into the the coach at the front axle instead of a frame camber going towards the road it is in the kitchen at the fridge.

I have a company in AZ that will pull the frame back down and reinforce it for me.

I also had the wall at the rear end of the slide come down past the floor line by 1.00 inch and LCI came down and added new gussets to lift the wall up to what should be the right place.

I think this long overhang from rear axle is a problem bad design .

Den.

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  • 2 weeks later...

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