Jump to content

gjhunter01

Validated Members
  • Posts

    668
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About gjhunter01

  • Birthday 09/15/1957

Optional Fields

  • SKP#
    118247
  • Lifetime Member
    No

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Camp Hosting, Workamping, motorcycle riding, tinkering

Contact Methods

  • Yahoo
    gjhunter1@aol.com

Recent Profile Visitors

9,412 profile views

gjhunter01's Achievements

  1. We have 70+ year old drivers and pilier operators, if you want to work, they will find a spot for you. Last night 1 of the 4 piler stations was shut down all night shift due to a labor shortage. Got another 1-1/2 inch more rain today, it's going to be a long harvest! The now 15 year old farmer's son is our after school hours harvest lifter operator. https://www.crystalsugar.com/
  2. Here is a video that our 12 year old farmer's son put together for their 2018 harvest (wheat, beans, corn, sugar beets) as a school project with his new drone. The beet harvest begins around the 14 min slot. That year we had an 8" snow storm and the harvest was stopped for a couple of days and then the mud driving began. These guys farm about 14,000 acres in North Dakota. The 3 combines have 40' heads or 24 corn row headers on them and are Auto Steer (meaning the seed planter coordinates are downloaded to the combine and they will follow the same path, the operator just takes control to turn the combine around). In the 12 row beet harvester, notice the operator is not driving the tractor, he is just watching the harvesting equipment behind him.The country music background was a nice touch
  3. Great, we had 2" of rain over the weekend, after only having 3" total since early July. Looks like we will now start the harvest on Tue with very muddy fields!! The Case quads will get a workout.
  4. The only problem I have had with too much swivel is when backing up down over a sharp drop off (end of a camp site pad). With the swivel axle turned 180 deg, the back of the trailer will drop low enough to scrape the licenses plate. I'm still using our trailer after 9 years FT and never had any legal issues. My latest tire has lasted 8k miles which is now only loaded to approx 600 lbs. I haul my bike front to back to allow the bike suspension to work as designed.
  5. This is our 7th year in Grand Forks doing the sugar beet harvest as full time RV'ers. We work for a local farmer and both the wife and I drive trucks hauling beets from the field to the piling station. Hopefully the heat delayed harvest will begin this Sunday at midnight. The people working at the piling stations are getting paid 4 hours for each day not working. If anyone is interested in working, checkout Craig's list for the ND area under transportation, several farms are looking for drivers. Pay is $20-30/hr, most farms will train drivers and some provide FHU's at their farm. No special drivers licenses required to drive a farm related semi in ND/MN. If you head South on 29 from Grand Forks, you will pass a piling station near Reynolds and a Crystal Sugar Factory in Hillsboro. From the highway, you can get a good idea of the beet storage process.
  6. Learn to drive like the commercial drivers do with multi axle trailers, swing wide and avoid sharp turns. A little planning ahead can go a long ways to make life easier for those rear tires.
  7. If you want to work the sugar beet harvest and can drive a truck (most are straight trucks and some have auto transmissions), then check out Craig's List under "Transportation Jobs" in Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, Minnesota, and Michigan. There are many farms looking for drivers during the Oct harvest and most pay $20-30/hr. In ND and Minn, a regular drivers license is all that is needed and some farms will train new drivers. We are heading back for our 7th year in 2021 and last year my wife was assigned to train 2 new drivers (not bad for being a new driver herself 6 years earlier).
  8. We use one of our compartments for the kitty litter box by just cutting a hole in the side for the cat to go in and out. One compartment that comes to mind is under the dining table seat. We have never had any smell issues, but it depends which brand of litter you use and also how often you clean it out. If we ever sell our RV, I can cover the hole with a decorative board or a insert panel and wall paper.
  9. Just get a cheap apartment size washer. We found a used Haire 1600 on Craig's List for $350 and it lasted 7 years at ave 1 load every other day (+1200 loads) before it finally quite ($4 Italian made drum bearing seal that entire world is out of stock on??). We since found a used Splendide W/D and it seems to work good so far. All washers work good, or the companies would soon be out of business. For CG's that restrict hanging laundry outside, we use a portable folding clothes rack that can be used inside to dry clothes while we sleep at night.
  10. I don't ever recall Mackinaw Island have a bug issue any time of the year. Being a island quite a ways from the main land, it's just not very bug inhabitable. Besides, the island being a major tourist attraction like it is, if bugs were a major issue, they would be sprayed and kept under control. Just search for past reviews about the island and I doubt that bugs would be mentioned. Now UP swamp land is a different story for bugs!
  11. In/out rule was also our plan, but that is easier said than done. Some items become necessities like adding a washer/dryer or a dehumidifer, or even upgrading the 5 tires to a much heavier G series, not to mention upgrading RV furniture to a heavier durable brand. RV's are like people, most will weigh heavier after 8+ years.
  12. We have been FT for 8+ years now and when we started the rig weighed in at just under 25k. A recent scale ticket shows we now weigh over 27k. Adding weight is hard to control, whether it's personal weight gain or rig weight! Leave yourself plenty of margin when it comes to rig weight.
  13. Call them and talk to them, you may be surprised at what can be negotiated, especially if you have a skill they really need.
  14. GM uses a oil monitor system that is based on engine revolutions and time, the system does not have any oil testing capabilities. At any time a person can reset the oil life monitor back to 100% and the system will start the count down over again, even without actually changing out the old oil. A lab test is needed for a true oil analysis. The operator needs to know what conditions the vehicle is operating in and to adjust the oil changes according. My truck is pulling heavy loads, so I change the oil at the 50% oil monitor level. I would do the same frequency if my truck were operated in a dusty environment or city type driving. Read you vehicle operators manual for oil changing parameters.
  15. Make your own trap, I've used waste motor oil or old antifreeze and it will work all winter up north protecting farm buildings. https://video.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=AwrCwDPMa4Ngg0wAoxAPxQt.;_ylu=Y29sbwNiZjEEcG9zAzEEdnRpZAMEc2VjA3Nj?p=mouse+trap+pail&type=Y219_F163_204671_102220&hsimp=yhs-freshy&hspart=tro&grd=1&ei=UTF-8&fr=yhs-tro-freshy#id=6&vid=8318e13f97e199395bbbdb50e56bd678&action=view
×
×
  • Create New...