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Towing Truck non-diesel ... Ford, Dodge, Chevy or Toyota? Input Please


OverSoul7

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First question, how much bigger are you talking? Depending on the trailer you may need a dually. Also, keep in mind there is no such thing as 'to big' when it comes to tow vehicles. Personally, I think you would be much farther ahead to go bigger than you think you need now instead of finding out you have to small of a truck for the trailer you just bought. Consider a 250/2500 as a minimum.

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Need a bit more info than "bigger". What type of trailer? Fifth wheel or travel trailer? Length? Weight loaded? Passenger requirements? Any other uses the truck will be used for? Are you comfortable driving a longer/wider truck or do you want to stay with a shorter/smaller truck? Gas or Diesel? Auto or manual? What speed will you be towing at? Mountainous terrain or flat ground for most of the towing?

 

That would be a start.

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I agree with the preveious responses. And if it is in your budget, consider a diesel as they serve much better as a tow vehicle and although the cost is more, the cost over the life of the truck is no more and likely less per mile. In addition, while the gas powered truck may be better on fuel when driving empty, towing the diesel will get significantly better mileage.

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Completely agree with everyone so far. Especially Mntom's "you can never go too big" and Kirk's "consider a diesel".

 

Personally... I would be looking hardest at a Ford or Dodge... "might" consider a Chevy... wouldn't even consider a Toyota. With the caveat that I tow full time, find that service/parts availability on the road is much easier with a Ford or Dodge and firmly believe "more truck is more better." ;)

 

It's important to determine though if this is going to be mainly a daily driver, where city mileage is important, or if it's primary purpose is to tow, how much, and where.

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There are millions of people pulling with trucks that are not diesel and cannot pull a semi trailer. I am talking about everyday trucks and I know a lot of people here have those. I would like to know about performance and reliability from them but I should have mentioned I do not want a dually. We want to go as small as possible while still being comfortable. I would like to hear from truck owners of the models above and how well their 250 or 350 pulls at what tow weight they are towing.

 

First question, how much bigger are you talking? Depending on the trailer you may need a dually. Also, keep in mind there is no such thing as 'to big' when it comes to tow vehicles. Personally, I think you would be much farther ahead to go bigger than you think you need now instead of finding out you have to small of a truck for the trailer you just bought. Consider a 250/2500 as a minimum.

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Yes do some serious thinking about how big you want to go. Can't tell how many times we have talked to people with an over-classed pickup with a DRV and the story is "we bough the truck because we were going to get a (light weight) trailer and then my wife fell in love with the DRV.

 

My response was, you are over-weight now and you will be over-weight at the accident. Love your DRV, trade for an appropriate sized truck.

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Yes do some serious thinking about how big you want to go. Can't tell how many times we have talked to people with an over-classed pickup with a DRV and the story is "we bough the truck because we were going to get a (light weight) trailer and then my wife fell in love with the DRV.

 

My response was, you are over-weight now and you will be over-weight at the accident. Love your DRV, trade for an appropriate sized truck.

ABSOLUTELY! And the insurance company can decline the claim for being in that dangerous situation of truck towing trailer that is too heavy.

I have driven many trucks over the years, both 1/2 ton to modern duallys with diesel engines and significant tow capacity. I have a MDT now for towing my 5er but use a pickup everyday. It is about safety, both for me and my passengers and the drivers near me on the road.

I remember years ago, I was so proud because I had restored a 1971 Chevrolet C10 with a 350/350 combo. Put lots of $ and work into it. It was my truck to go back and forth to work with, Hugger Orange with white cab. Fabulous. Then I got a boat and we towed the boat on vacations, but the camper shell proved to be too small for our 3 kids and us, so we got an 8' camper too. One time, while coming home from vacation, we had to travel down a significant and long grade in Cali north of San Luis Obispo. The weight of the boat, the camper, the kids, 3 tanks of fuel, etc., etc., well, you should be getting the picture. That 1/2 ton truck with rear drum brakes was over the weight limit and brakes faded badly coming down that grade. White knuckels all the way down. I have NEVER towed over capacity again. Now you know why I have an MDT and might get an HDT. My experience is MINE, but I wouldnt want anyone else to have one like it, although I know many have and will.

 

Safety is most important. Trucks and trailer can be replaced, but lives cant.

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Can't talk a whole lot about towing but a few comments on quality may help. We have a 2013 1500 RAM dual cab. Looked at Ford and Chevy, not Toyota, before we purchased new. Found RAM to be the best at the time on features, quality and value for money.

Prior to 2013 RAM models where a product of Chrysler/Dodge. As a result of the financial crisis. Fiat took over Chrysler/Dodge. They split the RAM division away from Dodge and formed a new arm called RAM Trucks. They read the designers at RAM the riot act and gave them an ultimatum to improve RAM or they would shut it down. As a result a whole new RAM was designed. The first of these came out in 2013. Every inch of the RAM was redesigned. Every panel. (Yes I know they look almost the same). As a result of the redesign and aggressive pricing RAM sales shot up. They have features such as air suspension and leveling. etc etc etc.

So for my money the RAM Truck is the best built and value for money pickup on the road. Towing? No idea but the truck itself is a great product.

 

Am I biased? You bet. I would marry my RAM if it was legal. :huh:

 

regards

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Yes do some serious thinking about how big you want to go. Can't tell how many times we have talked to people with an over-classed pickup with a DRV and the story is "we bough the truck because we were going to get a (light weight) trailer and then my wife fell in love with the DRV.

 

My response was, you are over-weight now and you will be over-weight at the accident. Love your DRV, trade for an appropriate sized truck.

What is DRV? MDT? HDT? And now I've forgotten SCREW because I forgot and didn't write it down and can't remember. Sorry, too new and heaven't learned the language.

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First question, how much bigger are you talking? Depending on the trailer you may need a dually. Also, keep in mind there is no such thing as 'to big' when it comes to tow vehicles. Personally, I think you would be much farther ahead to go bigger than you think you need now instead of finding out you have to small of a truck for the trailer you just bought. Consider a 250/2500 as a minimum.

After a short while of looking I am hoping to find a F-150 and trailer match or F-250. Ideally I'd go with 250 or 350 but we have to do monthly payments and this would not be a comfortable 60 months in order to do so. We have to think ahead to what if something happens to one of us and the other is left struggling or homeless. Yes, there are used out there but difficult to find reasonable prices for the mileage on them. But the fuel economy of the 150, if I could find a trailer comfortable for us (we do not want huge) would be ideal as we have at least another year of back and forth work travel and city living and when our trip ends will use the truck for same.

 

As for no such thing as too big, yes there is because it affects what one pays at the pump. We want to travel more which means fuel economy is a large part of the picture, but I understand what you mean by your statement.

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What is DRV? MDT? HDT? And now I've forgotten SCREW because I forgot and didn't write it down and can't remember.

DRV is a line of http://www.drvsuites.com/high quality, very heavy RVs.

 

MDT in the RV community usually refers to a "medium duty truck"

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HDT on the forums refers to a heavy duty truck, such as the 18 wheel folks operate.

4.0.ht1.jpg

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What is DRV? MDT? HDT? And now I've forgotten SCREW because I forgot and didn't write it down and can't remember. Sorry, too new and heaven't learned the language.

 

 

Some replies "drift" off topic.

 

Since you asked about trucks...

 

A pickup is usually called a Light Duty Truck ("LDT") - could be a half ton, 3/4 ton, on ton, etc. whether it's gas or diesel -

and what you are looking for (I think).

 

As Kirk said (with pics) an MDT is a Medium Duty Truck, an HDT is a Heavy Duty Truck (forums here for each).

Both of those designations would be powered by diesel engines - and capable of towing heavy trailers like the DRV brand.

No matter - they are *not* what you apparently are looking for..

 

Best advice - from your other thread on cloth seats.......go to dealers, RV shows, etc.

Looking is free and fun. Save the brochures (floor plans, etc) and make notes of what you like or don't like.

 

Do NOT believe what the salespersons tell you regarding tow vehicles.

Do your own research - when you think you know what you will be towing.

 

BTW - I'll join the rank/s of those not about to attempt the one you forgot, LOL!

 

.

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SCREW is a nickname for a Ford Super Duty Crew Cab truck either a F250 or F350. If you were talking about a RAM, you just add "ed" to the end of the Ford nickname

 

Obviously a new take on non-acronyms - or - learn something new every day?

 

BTW - I always thought FORD stood for - Fix Or Repair Daily - or- Found On The Road Dead.

 

(Had one once - - once was enough).

 

.

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Now the brand wars start. Any one of the Big Three, FOrd, Dodge or Chevy, will work for a trailer as long as it is within the trucks tow rating.

 

Before you can decide on the truck size, you need to determine the trailer size/weight first. Once you know the trailer, you can start looking for a truck. You need to know bumper pull or 5th wheel.

 

Just as a starting point, I would say 1/2 ton truck up to a max of a 25' travel trailer. Any 5th wheel, 3/4 ton truck. Over 30' 5er and up to 33' a 3/4 ton diesel. 36 to 40' 5er, a 1 ton diesel dually.

 

With any truck, you need to read the tow limits book from the manufacturers and read and understand all of the foot notes about the ratings.

 

First rule of RV shopping is to NEVER believe the sales person. Educate yourself on the tow ratings and understand.

 

Once you decide on a trailer and a truck combo, post on here and get honest input from the members. Lots of great experience here.

 

Ken

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Before you can decide on the truck size, you need to determine the trailer size/weight first. Once you know the trailer, you can start looking for a truck. You need to know bumper pull or 5th wheel.

 

 

Bingo,

 

Without knowing what you are going to pull, this thread is useless... especially if you are listening to a RV salesrep...

 

I agree with rpsinc..don't scrimp with your TV... even the DW can now spot seriously overloaded TV.. but hey, " I only tow on the weekends..." attitude..

 

I haul with a MDT and have fun with my RAM...

 

Not sure if this is current but the MX team we used to race for bought 2 Tundras,..sold them about 4 months later...one went RAM the other Chebby.. not great haulers but really bad gas mileage..

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I am looking at the Ford 150 3.5L Eco Boost Super Crew V6 4x4 IF I CAN FIND REASONABLE w low mileage 2013 and beyond with the 3.55 axle ratio giving me 10,700 to 11,500 towing capacity. Trailer I am looking at is Forest River/Salem Cruise Lite 201BH XL - following specs:

 

Hitch Wt 528 - is that too much? Will have Weight Distribution Hitch

 

Unloaded Vehicle Wt: 4195

 

CCC: 3295 Lbs.

 

23' 7" long

 

9'11" exterior height

 

8 foot wide exterior (I wanted 7.5 but just love this layout for us)

 

Black 32 g / Grey 32 g / Fresh Water 40 g

 

No slide like we wanted but plenty of room for us. Murphy bed / faux leather couch combo + dinette + bunk beds (luggage on top 2 dogs below like we wanted) and tub like I wanted so I can wash things out including the dogs.

 

Input. We might have to settle for 4 x 2 depending on what we find. Year end clearance is just starting so we are hoping the selection grows. We are going to use our credit union broker to help; us find what we want once we are sure what we want.

 

Input on choices appreciated.

 

Christine

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Christine, for a 2013 Ford F150 with 3.55 gears and the 3.5 Ecoboost V6 Supercrew, the max weights for towing are 9,500 pounds to 9,800 pounds. The only way you can get over that is with 3.73 or 4.10 gears and the max towing package. All three require a load distributing hitch like you noted.

 

Note that 9,800 pounds is calculated with minimum fuel, a driver and a stripped down truck. Each option you add that increases the weight of the truck will reduce your capacity. Depending on what you plan on putting in the back of the truck and how much you put into the trailer, you will need to watch your overall weight and distribution of that weight.

 

Here is your towing capacity chart from ford:

 

http://www.ford.com/resources/ford/general/pdf/towingguides/13flrv&tt_f150.pdf

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My humble opinion would be to not tow with a V6 engine. Is ok for a run around vehicle but no real pulling power. Pulling power rquires torque and a turboed V6 like the ecoboost ford has some horsepower when the rpms go up and the turbo kicks in but that does not translate to torque which gives you the real pulling power. That is why diesels work so good....tons of torque. I would at least stick with a V8 for more pulling power.

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I found the article below has shown me some errors in my figuring. I didn't realize I had to add the weight of the vehicle as part of the towing capacity. I thought I just had to do passengers and cargo and trailer and all trailer cargo plus all fuel.

 

http://www.edmunds.com/ford/f-150/2015/long-term-road-test/2015-ford-f-150-towing-nearly-5000-pounds.html

 

Looks like I have some more research to do. I am glad I am not running out and buying the wrong thing again this time.

 

I am trying to get good fuel mileage on top of it all as well. Looks like we are going to need to downsize the trailer and cargo or get a bigger truck. Or, get a bigger truck and downsize the trailer and cargo for now and move up to a larger trailer later.

 

The important thing is I continue to learn. Fumble and learn but still learn.

 

Christine

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