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Getting fuel


kb0zke

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Our practice with our MH is to get fuel at the end of each travel day, just before we go to the campground. Having a full tank means that there is less condensation in the tank (less air space) and should we have to suddenly take off we won't have to worry about getting fuel.

 

Should we switch to a towable, the practice would be a bit different. We will go to the campground first, get the coach level and electricity connected. Then Jo Ann will finish getting the coach ready while I take the truck back to get fuel. Again, condensation prevention and being prepared for an escape.

 

Why not treat the towable the same as the MH? With our Foretravel I sit high enough that I look semi drivers in the eye, and there isn't much of the coach above my head, so it is pretty easy to eyeball whether there might be a height problem. With a towable, especially a 5'er, there will be a LOT of coach above my head. Also, the Foretravel can easily use the truck lane's larger fuel nozzle. From what I've read, the diesel pickups can't, so that means I will be limited to the regular lanes. The truck will be big enough, why add a coach to it?

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We are a 5th wheel towed by a 2012 Chevy diesel. We rarely fill up on the road, unless out in the desert and traveling long distances. The truck lanes do have larger nozzles that have a much higher output, that will still work in our truck. You just have to be careful with the fill rate as you are filling. A lot of the truck facilities do occasionally have a pump, usually close to the pay station that has a smaller nozzle. I usually try to stay away from the truck stops, as experience has shown their prices are sometimes much higher than a smaller gas station/mini-mart type station, but at 13' 5" high, we have never had a clearance problem with any facility.

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As an option, many pickup's use auxiliary tanks for distance, fueling choices, peace of mind etc. Most of the aux tanks have larger openings that can take the larger nozzles and flow rates.

 

While I agree with the running with full tanks, condensation takes a while to get there, the fuel filters will also pick up a fair amount of moisture. EXCEPT, buddy was filling while the tanker was filling a small stations underground tanks. He picked up a LOT of water with the fuel. He also filled 5 - 5 gal jugs for a backhoe and had 3 "riders" (coworkers, ride pool) as witnesses and the receipt. $5000 damage to the injectors and fuel system that the station had to pay for. He had about 6 oz of water in each of the 5 gal jugs the next day when it settled out.

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I fill the TV when the wife is setting up the inside also. I do not do it for condisation in the tank. I do it in case for any reason we need to hook up quickly and leave. So we can have the best range of travel if needed.

My 2015 Ram is able to fill up with the lager semi pump.

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I usually fill up the next morning, before getting breakfast in Denny's at a Flying J.

So far in over 4 decades of having a RV and staying at many campgrounds.. I have never suddenly needed to take off.

If I did, I still have enough fuel to get many miles down the road.

 

And for the last 13 years of having a DP. Never have had any moisture show up in the W/S filter clear bowl.

By not having a Full Tank before parking overnight. I do fill tank right before long stays.

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As I sit here on the 26th day of our month long stay, I have a full tank because I followed the condensation advice I had received. That full tank cost me $2.49 a gallon. I'm absolutely doing a rethink on this one because:

 

1) Just down the road they are now selling at $1.85/gal - straight fuel, no bio diesel

2) When I fueled I was merely topping off a half tank. That half tank will still get me across most states so there is plenty of wiggle room for bugging out.

 

So my rethink is, if you fuel at stations that have a high turn around on fuel, the chances of moisture are probably considerably less than a slow mover such as a mom and pop station. In my case this time round, if I had delayed the topping off I could have saved enough money to buy lunch for my bride and I.

 

Lunch with a lovely lady wins.

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In my case this time round, if I had delayed the topping off I could have saved enough money to buy lunch for my bride and I.

Sometimes you can predict if fuel will be going up or down in price before hand and be right. I haven't kept track, but I would guess I am right a little more than half the time, but for sure I have been wrong often. Therefore, I am now just looking at fuel cost by location using Gas Buddy app. If I am heading for an area with lower cost fuel, I may wait to get it later. Likewise, if I am headed for more expensive fuel I will top off where it's cheaper. Other than that, I don't leave tanks low waiting for cost of fuel to drop.

 

I don't know the fuel range for motor homes but our HDT can go a long distance, perhaps 1500 miles? between fill ups. I dont wait that long typically. That range makes it easier and more benificial to plan where we buy fuel based on price.

 

Jim

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I have long had the habit of fueling just before we stop for the night with every RV we have owned, no matter what fuel it uses, even the tow that burned propane. No special reason other than that I don't care to stop for fuel as soon as we get started for a travel day.

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As an option, many pickup's use auxiliary tanks for distance, fueling choices, peace of mind etc. Most of the aux tanks have larger openings that can take the larger nozzles and flow rates.

 

While I agree with the running with full tanks, condensation takes a while to get there, the fuel filters will also pick up a fair amount of moisture. EXCEPT, buddy was filling while the tanker was filling a small stations underground tanks. He picked up a LOT of water with the fuel. He also filled 5 - 5 gal jugs for a backhoe and had 3 "riders" (coworkers, ride pool) as witnesses and the receipt. $5000 damage to the injectors and fuel system that the station had to pay for. He had about 6 oz of water in each of the 5 gal jugs the next day when it settled out.

"small station" is the key words. I only buy fuel from large turnover stations.

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We fill on the road and have for years. We use truck stops preferably FJ/Pilot as we have RV plus card for the fuel discount many of then have separate RV lanes and our Ford has the high capacity filler so we can use the truck lanes when we need.

 

We usually stop every 3 hours or so for a break and fuel then we rarely get below 1/2 tank or so. We have not unhooked ever to fuel that I can remember and have never had a problem with fueling.

 

Price is a consideration but getting fuel when we need it is primary. We open the valve to check for water in the fuel and have never had a drop out in this 08 Ford. Fueling is a non issue for us.

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Saw no need for Aux tank, driving about 250 miles a day meant we were well within our limits, filling up at end of day. Once we were parked we were not driving off again. Besides Ron preferred having the full toolbox in back. Never had fast fill issue with our Dodge.

 

We only get concerned about mpoidture and algae if we are sitting more than a month. However we use stabilizer and algaecide with every tank full of diesel

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As I sit here on the 26th day of our month long stay, I have a full tank because I followed the condensation advice I had received. That full tank cost me $2.49 a gallon. I'm absolutely doing a rethink on this one ...

 

 

We carry 300 gallons, so we stop based on price alone, but relating to Dennis' comment above, I look at it as purchasing diesel futures, you win a few, you lose a few.

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Unless you have small tankage, say 30 gals or less, then you can pick your fuel stop based on price and ease of access. We have a 148 gal tank. Assuming worst case at 8 MPG, we can go at least 800 miles on a 100 gallons. Take it out to 120 gallons and bingo almost a thousand miles. When traveling watch Gas Buddy and stop in the least expensive areas. Our first mnotorhome had two tanks one at 18 gallons the other at 16 gallons. Stopped every 170-180 miles for fuel. Price didn't enter into the decision.

On to condensation discussion. Condensation is not an overnight problem. Maybe an overweek problem. Six months in humid South Florida with a less than half full tank and the filter never showed water collection.

 

Bill

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I have a 100 gal aux tank in my pickup bed and can run 1200 miles on a filled tank. I rarely get fuel on the road and usually get enough fuel to get to my next long term stop before I head out. I also always keep my aux fuel tank as empty as possible during any stops of a week or more and even run my pick up tank down below half. My theory is I don't want old fuel sitting around in my tank. I would much rather fill the tank with fresh fuel and then burn it off quick. I never had condensation problems. I am bias due to my hobby of restoring old farm tractors and finding tanks full of tarnished old fuel that is a PITA to clean out.

We also stop every couple of hours to stretch, usually at a rest area or where we want to. I really like not having to worry about getting fuel during a trip. As far as the extra 800 lb fuel weight, my dually never seems to know the difference if the aux tank is full or empty, it handles and drives the same.

Greg

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I didn't worry about a nickle or dime difference in fuel cost when I started fulltime and diesel was $4.00+ I sure am not going to worry about it now. The only thing I worry about is entrance and egress from fuel stations while hooked up. I do look for stations that have separate diesel pumps that cater to local trucking.

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We thought about a extra fuel tank but then why carry around that extra weight when we stop every 3 hours or so for a stretch. In10 years of being on the road we have never had a problem finding fuel no matter where we were.

 

There was time a few years ago when diesel went to over 5.00 per gal. That year instead of wintering in Az we wintered in Florida which was about half the distance. If the time comes when we can not afford fuel for travel we will park the RV in the driveway retreat to the S&B and live happily ever after.

 

Stopping every 3 hours or so does not bother us or interfere with our travel as we are retired and not in any hurry at all.

 

Of course we all march to the beat of our own drum and every way is the right way.

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Sometimes you can predict if fuel will be going up or down in price before hand and be right. I haven't kept track, but I would guess I am right a little more than half the time, but for sure I have been wrong often. Therefore, I am now just looking at fuel cost by location using Gas Buddy app. If I am heading for an area with lower cost fuel, I may wait to get it later. Likewise, if I am headed for more expensive fuel I will top off where it's cheaper. Other than that, I don't leave tanks low waiting for cost of fuel to drop.

 

I don't know the fuel range for motor homes but our HDT can go a long distance, perhaps 1500 miles? between fill ups. I dont wait that long typically. That range makes it easier and more benificial to plan where we buy fuel based on price.

 

Jim

Gas Buddy is your friend. It will tell you which way prices are going. You can look ahead and see what prices are so you can pick your stop. Things like is the price cheaper or more when I cross the state line.

Bill

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...Our practice with our MH is to get fuel at the end of each travel day, just before we go to the campground...Should we switch to a towable, the practice would be a bit different. We will go to the campground first, get the coach level and electricity connected. Then Jo Ann will finish getting the coach ready while I take the truck back to get fuel...Why not treat the towable the same as the MH?.....

If you have a 5th wheel that you have to unhook to get level, then getting fuel after checking into the campground or before hooking up in the morning will give you more options of fuel stations that are easy to access. We very rarely unhook for just an overnight. I do like to start the day with a full tank, but will fuel either on the way to the campground or on the way out in the morning if I have seen a good place to get fuel. If we are going to stop in the morning, we generally will not eat breakfast before pulling out. While I fuel up, DW will go into the store and get danish, donuts, or breakfast sandwichs to eat. We have camped at a number of state park, forest service and COE campgrounds that are far enough off the main roads that going out to get just fuel does not seem worth it to me. In those cases, I will do a little research on where the fuel stations are located and make a decision on whether to fuel before or after the campground stop. If we are staying more than overnight, I will wait to fuel until after we unhook the trailer.

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only once did I have to "escape quickly" from an RV park, we came under a small zombie attack but my DW dispatched them quickly with her AK-47 from the safety of the roof our fifth wheel, just kidding, back to the post. I normally get my fuel in the morning along the chosen path we are heading

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