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Parking the house...


MisterX

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So, I've just about settled on the monster 42' (41' 9 inches...) Fifthwheel. I've researched everything! (yeh right... I've been at this for three years and I still have no clue what I'm doing!)

Now comes the fun part, I'm planning to drive from Texas to the East coast (NC? Virginia? Who knows!), and see how long it takes me to get there and maybe get a little bit of New England in before it gets cold and I have to try and high tail it down south to figure out where to stay warm...

How hard of a time am I going to have finding spots to park a monster like this along the way? Is it realistic to think I can get on the road right after I get her all prepped and geared up and find somewhere to be out there?

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Your options will be pretty limited once you go over 40' in New England. There aren't a lot of campgrounds that will be able to accomodate that size. Make sure you plan for the stops you want to make and research for campgrounds that can handle it along the way. The other thing to consider is your height, particularly in New England where there are a number of bridges with low clearances. So, know the height of your rig before you take off. Typically, if a tractor trailer can go that route, so can you. Suggest you get a truckers GPS to plan your route to avoid those issues.

Tim

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I've been out East multiple trips and believe most of the parks in the TT Northeast zone can handle you. But go after Labor Day as the parks will be very full July/August. Wells, ME, Gateway to Cape Cod, Lake and Shore (NJ shore), Timothy Lake South (Poconos), should all handle a big rig. Pick up a Thousand Trails Zone pass. Things are tighter out East...with careful planning, you should be ok. If you are new and not 100% able to manuever in heavy traffic, I'd be extra cautious.

In the NYC area, I leave Timothy Lake South on Sunday morning and head to the Jersey shore...after Labor Day. Minimal traffic at that time.

Vermont is pretty but didn't see many campgrounds. 

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If you look at the campground listings on campgroundreviews.com one of the criteria is "big rig friendly."  That gives you an idea of what the people who have stayed at the campground think of the ability of the campground to accommodate you.

Off hand, I can second ToddF's suggestion on Timothy Lake South (not North).  Also, the Thousand Trails at Harbor View (Colonial Beach, VA) and Chesapeake Bay, Glouchester, VA.

http://pastorscott.com/travel/2018/07/15/2018-timothy-lake-south-thousand-trails-marshalls-creek-pa/
http://www.pastorscott.com/travel/2019/06/26/2019-harbor-view-thousand-trails-colonial-beach-va/
http://www.pastorscott.com/travel/2019/06/11/2019-chesapeake-bay-thousand-trails-gloucester-va/

Our "Here and There" Blog

 

2005 Safari Cheetah Motorhome

 

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No part of the eastern area has as many campgrounds as we find in the west, whether public parks or commercial ones. As mentioned, the ones that are there are smaller and have less open space. There are no Corps of Engineers parks or similar agency campgrounds and most state parks are also smaller with fewer and smaller campgrounds. Reservations are much more needed in the east and particularly so for weekends and holidays. As you go north this becomes more pronounced. In the New England states this is especially true as most RVs there are setup in an RV park for the entire season and move about very little. With an RV as large as yours this will be even more important. 

The roads once away from the major highways are also more narrow and have more traffic because the population is more dense and land is less available. It will be very important that you practice driving and maneuvering your truck & RV before you get into New England or you will not enjoy the experience. You didn't say how much experience you have in driving a truck and fifth wheel or other trailer, but if you don't have much experience, you need to find a parking lot that is empty and practice. It might even be time and money well spent to get some lessons from one of the RV driving schools. 

Good travelin !...............Kirk

Full-time 11+ years...... Now seasonal travelers.
Kirk & Pam's Great RV Adventure

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I can't tell from the ad as to how many eastern parks are in this reference but it may be an option for you:

https://www.big-rigs-rv.com/Home.html

Here's another:  https://bigrigresorts.com/

As you travel check out Corp of Engineer campgrounds as they most often have big rig sites.  Not in every state though.

https://rvlife.com/corps-of-engineers-rv-campgrounds/

I'm sure it's very doable but you'll need to investigate before the trip.  I found these by Google 'RV Parks for Big Rigs' and many more appeared.  There are folks in the east who have large RVs so they must go somewhere up there!! 

Edited by 2gypsies

Full-timed for 16 Years
Traveled 8 yr in a 2004 Newmar Dutch Star 40' Motorhome
and 8 yr in a 33' Travel Supreme 5th Wheel

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22 minutes ago, Kirk W said:

... There are no Corps of Engineers parks or similar agency campgrounds and most state parks are also smaller with fewer and smaller campgrounds.  

I'll have to disagree with you on that, Kirk. There are COE campgrounds at lakes in many parts of the east - especially Georgia and the Carolinas. GA and the Carolinas also have an extensive network of state parks, mostly on or near lakes, with camping. We have stayed at several. The Tennessee River Valley has any number of TVA campgrounds that are run very similarly to COE campgrounds. You are right in that many of the campgrounds and RV parks in the east can have sites that are harder to get into - often because of the density of trees that we don't have in many places out west. We spend a lot of time in both the east and west and I've seen about as many 40+ ft. fifth wheels and DPs in the places we stay in the east as out west. It is more difficult, however, to find affordable camping the farther north you move on the east coast. That said, we have "done" New England with a 36' fifth wheel and a very long truck and didn't have any more problems with site sizes in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont or New York than we did on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington. You just have to plan ahead, talk to park management about your needs, and do your research.

Rob

2012 F350 CC LB DRW 6.7
2020 Solitude 310GK-R, MORryde IS, disc brakes, solar, DP windows
Full-time since 8/2015

 

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4 hours ago, Kirk W said:

I intended to say in New England.  😊

You did later. State parks in Indiana are always full on holiday weekends too, reservaitons W/elect. are normally made on Jan 1 for all the ensuing year. The only openings are for dry camping.

Edited by Ray,IN

 

2000 Winnebago Ultimate Freedom USQ40JD, ISC 8.3 Cummins 350, Spartan MM Chassis. USA IN 1SG retired;Good Sam Life member,FMCA ." And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you--ask what you can do for your country.  John F. Kennedy 20 Jan 1961

 

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Do not drive through or near New York City. If for some reason you do get on the wrong road be very careful of the signage many roads do not allow trucks. Tolls are outrageous.  Really high. 

I do advocate touring the Northeast.  Places to visit: New Jersey shore,  MysticCT for the Seaport and the Submarine Base with the USS Nautilus,  Cape Cod, Sturbridge Village,  the coast of Maine starting at Boothbay and going Downeast. Camden/Rockland pretty harbors, Acadia NP with Cadillac Mountain,  a Reversing falls in Pembroke,  all the way to Calais (pronounced Callus),  then loop back on RT 9 to Bangor then on west on US2 through NH and on to VT or slide south towards Sebago Lake  And over to Mount Washington  and Cog Railway, overnight allowed in lower parking lot.

Don't forget Cape Hatteras and the Outer Banks of NC. The cross over the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel to the Eastern Shore through VA, MD and DE. You could take the ferry to Cape May, NJ  and go along the Jersey Shore.

Do avoid Washington/Baltimore area as the traffic is miserable and you will be  besieged with expensive tolls.

Enjoy,

Bill

Bill & Lynn Baxter

MCI102A3 Conversion, Detroit Diesel S50  

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Here's another site I like.  This person gives awesome reviews and photos of places they stayed with their 40' motorhome & many would work for a bigger size.  They also enjoy public parks.  She goes through the whole campground stating what are the big sites and what to stay away from... sometimes site by site.  She's great.   Also search on her site for a particular state or city and read her blog on them for lots of good siteseeing ideas.

Go to the top line and click on the campground bar and a list of states will appear that they've stayed in.  Click which one you want.  Some of them in the east are SC, NC, NJ, NY, PA, GA, FL, MA, MD, VA, TN

https://wheelingit.us/category/rv-park-ratings/

Full-timed for 16 Years
Traveled 8 yr in a 2004 Newmar Dutch Star 40' Motorhome
and 8 yr in a 33' Travel Supreme 5th Wheel

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We are 53 feet long truck and RV. We call ahead for a camping spot  .Pull through, 50 amp , full hookup and we always tell them how long  we are. We are all over the country  and have never had a problem finding what we need.

Oh.. we do not do truck stops, rest areas , wall mart .We do CG's

Edited by richfaa

Helen and I are long timers ..08 F-350 Ford,LB,CC,6.4L,4X4, Dually,4:10 diff dragging around a 2013 Montana 3402 Big Sky

SKP 100137. North Ridgeville, Ohio in the summer, sort of and where ever it is warm in the winter.

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My blog posts about us traveling in New England in a 35' motorhome towing a car start on September 4, 2010. In case you want to follow along start here: https://sandcastle.sandsys.org/2010/09/womens-rights-national-historic-park/

Linda Sand

Blog: http://sandcastle.sandsys.org/

Former Rigs: Liesure Travel van, Winnebago View 24H, Winnebago Journey 34Y, Sportsmobile Sprinter conversion van

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There is a section in the HDT forum here called HHRG (Heavy Haulers Resource Guide).  At the top of it there's a site dedicated to campgrounds that handle large rigs.  We're 70' overall and use it often.  And just because a campground says they're "big rig" friendly doesn't mean they have a clue what "big" might mean.

Don't be thinking you can wait until dusk and find a campground.  Call a couple hours before you intend to quit for the day.  Mid afternoon, decide where you might like to stop, locate some options and call ahead.  It gives the wife something to do.☺️

KW T-680, POPEMOBILE
Newmar X-Aire, VATICAN
Lots of old motorcycles, Moto Guzzi Griso and Spyder F3 currently in the front row
Young enough to play in the dirt as a retired farmer.
contact me at rickeieio1@comcast.net

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1 hour ago, podwerkz said:

The bigger the RV, the more like 'work' it becomes.

Not necessarily, We have less set up time in our 46' 5th wheel than we did in out 38' because of technology. Once in a site, we don't have to use leveling boards anymore.  Just unhook and push a button.   Power cord is stored on a reel so I'm not fighting that out of a compartment... this is being done while the RV levels itself.  Water has a built in regulator and filter system, so you only connect the hose itself.  After the RV is level, my wife pushes 4 button and the slides are out it we're done.  We have set up in as few as 10 minutes from backing in a site to having a beverage in hand with chairs and awning out.

Jim's Adventures

Old Spacecraft.... Who knows whats next

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Route planning, researching roads and bridges for clearances,  checking campsites online, navigating thru heavy traffic, dealing with impatient motorists, talking to others about certain campgrounds, fueling issues, avoiding certain areas because your rig might not fit....maneuvering a large rig in a tight situation, THAT is all work also.

It might not be as much physical exertion at the campsite, but it takes more mental effort getting there, and that IS 'work'...that stress you feel at the end of a long day on the road...we've all been there.

It is generally more effort than toting a small camper, and that's my point.

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by podwerkz

Nothing to see here. 

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There are campgrounds at COE Projects in some of the New England States, Not all are managed by the Corps, but some are. Some are managed by state agencies. Links for Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont. Whether the sites are large enough for an HDT rig and have the amenities that one wants/needs is something that each has to determine for themselves. 

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On 7/21/2020 at 8:24 PM, MisterX said:

So, I've just about settled on the monster 42' (41' 9 inches...) Fifthwheel. I've researched everything! (yeh right... I've been at this for three years and I still have no clue what I'm doing!)

Now comes the fun part, I'm planning to drive from Texas to the East coast (NC? Virginia? Who knows!), and see how long it takes me to get there and maybe get a little bit of New England in before it gets cold and I have to try and high tail it down south to figure out where to stay warm...

How hard of a time am I going to have finding spots to park a monster like this along the way? Is it realistic to think I can get on the road right after I get her all prepped and geared up and find somewhere to be out there?

for the parking spots: start making reservations as soon as you can

for getting on the road: do a full systems check, like maybe stay in it a night and use everything before you leave, new rv's are notorious for having issues right away and being close to the dealer would be nice

2000 volvo 610
2013 cyclone 3950

 

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  • 2 months later...

Little late getting back to everyone here, but I appreciate the information. In the end we went with a 42' rig (46' over bed) and a F350 Dually long bed. Been on the road now for 3 months in the south. It's been amazing! We decided to save new england area for next spring. Finally getting used to driving around the rig and taking some smaller roads as we have gone along. Having driven through Boston in a normal car... I will admit there's a level of stress in that thought hah!

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