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Wrknrvr

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Interesting......  Vern, since you're already running singles, the sidewall idea is moot, but the increased volume will drop the pressures.  See the current discussion on air bags.

However, since you're still tandem, you likely can't safely drop pressures far enough to realize any real benefit, without risking the tire falling off the rim.

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  Now what I am curious about is, Is there a difference in the ride of different tires in the same application. As same size tire in the same configuration.

 

 Just like car tires act differently in the same size, but different makes on the same vehicle in the same position and all the technical compounds and ???

 

 Also the other post got me to think differently than the air bag discussion.

 

 Now remember same application. Just different tire make and model.

 

 

 Well my fishing trip went bad this fall, so I am bored again.

 

  Just thinking,   Vern

 

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1 hour ago, jeffw said:

Pressure makes a huge difference. We are not singled, and went from over 100PSI to 70 on the drives and the ride is so much better.

 

How many miles have you driven with 70 psi?

Have you lowered the steer tires at all?

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It's been that way since mid last year. Maybe 15k? I have the steers at 90 to start. That's based on our front axle weight w/o the trailer on. We could go less pressure there with the trailer on, but that wouldn't work well otherwise.

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I do believe that Michelin has softer side walls to give a softer ride, but I don't like them because of the side wall cracking.  I talked to a Michelin Rep and he called it Ozone cracking and I asked him if that was the case then why didn't the other manufactures crack like theirs.  

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Different types of tires in the same size would have different ride properties.      An open shoulder lug tire will be lumpier than a rib steer.     The tread pattern itself is part of it and, the tread interaction with road surfaces and the tire carcass.   

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1 hour ago, ARGO said:

Lots of trucking co's tried them, MANY have gone back for several reasons. Myself, with the light loads we have on the drive, I'm worried about lockup on hard braking in the wet.

My truck came with the supper singles and I have wondered the same. So far the answer has been no but I haven put on enough miles to give a educated answer. There is just about the same number of square inches of tread on the road as with duals so unless there is a trapped cusion of water under the tire there should not be much difference for equally loaded truck. 

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56 minutes ago, Parrformance said:

How many miles have you driven with 70 psi?

Have you lowered the steer tires at all?

I lowered mine from 100 psi to 85 and lost the seal. Couldn't get it to seal. Had the truck jacked up and air available. Guy came from a mile away and gave it a blast with an air blaster. That will be $150.00 Not a happy camper. The sidewalls on the tires I have are real stiff.

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My guess is tire load index or capacity or “ply rating” has the most effect on ride.

What I learned at some training at an undisclosed location:

Tires are the first suspension component. Inflation psi for the load being carried is important for ride and traction. Modern low rolling resistance tires do not need to be blowed up like a wood wagon wheel to get the best fuel economy.  

Rule of thumb - Truck tires should be inflated to provide 10% sidewall height reduction rim to tread on the bottom vs rim to tread on portion not on the ground. Manufacturers minimum psi and above should be maintained for on highway use. 

Psi can be reduced a lot for off highway flotation and traction at low speed. Ideally these trucks have on board inflation systems.

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