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Anyone seen this ---> http://www.rvbusiness.com/2015/03/safety-inspections-required-on-texas-trailers/

 

 

 

If this is new, seems like kinda short notice.

 

"Included in renewal notices sent to owners of trailers with registration expiring this month and later will be notification that the trailer is required to have passed a safety inspection at a state-certified vehicle inspection station within 90 days prior to the new registration sticker’s being issued. No proof of safety inspection, no renewal of registration."

 

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Have our 5th wheel done every year, but not our two utility trailers for the ministry. Will be interested to see what comes out at renewal time. The one utility trailer stays down in Mexico at a Children's Home, so probably won't do a thing on that one, unless I need to move it elsewhere, or bring it back into the states.

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What's is also interesting is that some of us are destination campers and don't have a vehicle that will accommodate our FW. I'm the poster child for that scenario.

 

I just bought a Dodge RAM 1500 but there is no way it will tow my FW. We hire a commercial hauler to move it where we want it and we keep it at that location for months (think: weekend vacation home).

 

Unless Texas creates a mobile inspection team, some of us are screwed as I know several others that have this situation, including many with RVs of various types parked in backyards or RV storage lots.

 

EDIT: For those living in Texas, you may be aware that effective March 1, 2015, the vehicle inspection and vehicle registration process is merged. The linked article in Post #1 talks to that occurrence.

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We have owned some type of trailer or fifth wheel since 2003. We have gotten an annual safety inspection done on our unit when we are in state. The inspection its self is rather simple. They check that running lights work, turn signals work and break lights work when the brake peddle is depressed. That is it, nothing that is not done by DH everytime we hook up to pull the thing down the road. For those people who are stationary, this may be a problem. Some RV parks require that the vehicle "have current plates and be road worthy" because it is not supposed to be a perminant situation. I see problems for some, but nothing which can not be delt with in time.

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Anyone seen this ---> http://www.rvbusiness.com/2015/03/safety-inspections-required-on-texas-trailers/

 

 

 

If this is new, seems like kinda short notice.

 

"Included in renewal notices sent to owners of trailers with registration expiring this month and later will be notification that the trailer is required to have passed a safety inspection at a state-certified vehicle inspection station within 90 days prior to the new registration sticker’s being issued. No proof of safety inspection, no renewal of registration."

 

It's not anything new, trailers in Texas with a GVWR of more then 4500 lbs have needed an inspection (and brakes) since the invention of fire. Even the article you posted said "Texas law has for decades required annual safety inspection of trailers with a gross weight (weight of the trailer plus its carrying capacity or actual load) of more than 4,500 pounds.". It is just that too many people don't bother to pay attention to the law.

Like Jean said, it isn't a big deal and has been discussed ad nauseum on this forum. Texas is just changing from two stickers to one sticker and that method will force all the scofflaws to inspect their trailers now.

There are also several threads about the procedure on how to renew your registration if you are out of state and unable to get it inspected.

 

A trailer inspection costs a whopping $15. Somehow I don't see anyone going broke over $1.25 a month. Even a DOT inspection is only $65. If you can't afford the inspection and registration costs, maybe RV'ing isn't for you. A quick read of the full story in the provided link shows what is required for an inspection. The article plainly stated "To pass the safety inspection, the trailer must have an operational brake system, tires and wheel assembly that meets requirements, and all lights - tail lights, brake lights, license plate light, side-marker lights and clearance lights - must be operational. Also, the trailer must have side and rear reflectors.".

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And to answer the next question, a very simple search will turn up this:

 


Special Circumstances

Out of State Motorists

If your vehicle is out of state and you are unable to complete a Texas vehicle inspection in order to renew your registration, you will be able to self-certify that the vehicle is out of state and will be permitted to register. The self-certification process will be limited to:

  • Active duty military
  • Full-time students
  • Seasonal Texans, RV’ers
  • Apportioned vehicles
  • Elected Congressional officials

You will be able to renew your registration using self-certification online, by mail or in-person. Please contact your county tax office for more information about their requirements for out-of-state registration renewal. To find the contact information for your county of residence, please visit the TxDMV website.

If you renew your vehicle registration using the out-of-state self-certification option, a remark will be placed on your vehicle record indicating that an inspection is still due. Once you return to the state, you must complete a Texas vehicle inspection within three days of arrival at your home, duty station, or destination. It is very important that you keep the VIR issued after completing your inspection in case you are stopped by law enforcement before the remark is removed from your vehicle record, which takes about 48 hours. The remark will only be removed upon payment of the state’s portion of the inspection fee and verification of a current, passing inspection.

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Thanks folks, I didn't quite understand. My state has no inspection on cars, trucks or trailers, so kinda new to me.

The question about those that need to hire their trailer hauled yearly to get renewed looks like it might be a pain.

I am sure mobile services will pop up if they don't already exist.

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One question I have not seen an answer for is what provisions have been made for trailers that do not move. There are many trailers that sit in an RV park year after year without ever being moved. While an exemption is described for those who are out of state, I see nothing to deal with this circumstance, or those who just sit in one place for several months at a time. If I have to hook up and tow my trailer (assuming I have a vehicle with which to tow it), it is going to cost a lot more than the $7 just to get it there. And, since inspection stations are only permitted to charge $7 for the inspection, I doubt many folks would be willing to provide such a mobile service without charging a trip charge as well (assuming the state would even license them to do so).

 

While I understand the intent of the law, and completely agree that an inspection program will force some unsafe trailers to be repaired at least once a year, for the vast majority of us this is nothing but a pain in the ***. All the items inspected on a trailer are things that most of us check EVERY TIME WE HOOK UP, and I'd venture that far more defective braking systems and inoperative lights are due to the driver failing to connect the umbilical cord than will ever be discovered and corrected by this inspection program. But, it is what it is.

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I'm not a Texas resident, but I did pass a couple of Holiday Inns when I last visited that beautiful state, just a couple of weeks ago.....

 

I entered the state at Wichita Falls, and drove to Big Bend, rode motorcycles around there for a few days, then drove north and left the state by Perryton. At no time did I need to dodge, nor even see a pothole. The roads I experienced were nothing short of fantastic. Granted, I wasn't in the big metropolitan areas, by design.

 

However, where I live, near Cincinnati, OH, we have some spare potholes. If you'd like some, I can send you a box of holes. ^_^

 

Actually, while $15 may seem steep for a quick visual inspection, I wish trailers were inspected everywhere. There's some real junk on the roads here.

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Howdy!

 

As stated above inspection of trailers have been required for years but little or no enforcemnet has been done to date. So that being said my 5er is due inspection and registration next month April. Anyone know of a location in the Livingston area near Escapees that does trailer inspections.

 

"Happy Trails"

Chiefneon

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Rick,

 

Gotta agree with you. My state (Tennessee) has no vehicle or trailer inspections and there is some real junk on the road here. Two points though. I tried googling what I consider a basic question. Does annual vehicle inspection increase highway safety? I got no hits on any comparative studies saying yay or nay, so if anyone has any I would appreciate seeing them. Secondly, I was raised in Texas and maybe things have changed since I moved fifteen years ago but the inspections were not standardized from station to station and not really sure there was any real oversight by any enforcement agency. Anecdotally, my last two pickup inspections before moving consisted of scraping off the old sticker and putting on a new one and taking my $$. I made the statement to the tech at the last one " you've got to be kidding" and his reply was "I could tell when you drove in you were going to pass". I made him remove the sticker and went elsewhere where I still got only a cursory exam. Moral to my story. I am in favor of inspections if they increase safety and if they are standardized and spot checks are made like health departments do with food inspections.

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I'm not a Texas resident, but I did pass a couple of Holiday Inns when I last visited that beautiful state, just a couple of weeks ago.....

 

I entered the state at Wichita Falls, and drove to Big Bend, rode motorcycles around there for a few days, then drove north and left the state by Perryton. At no time did I need to dodge, nor even see a pothole. The roads I experienced were nothing short of fantastic. Granted, I wasn't in the big metropolitan areas, by design.

 

Come to where the Eagle Ford Shale areas are south of I-10 between San Antonio and Houston.

 

Less than five years ago, I'd run down these roads on my Harley and have a great time. Nowadays, I'd think twice about taking my 4x4 truck down those same roads. The roads are like riding a surf wave, shoulders are chewed up, potholes everywhere. There is a constant streams of complaints in the local papers about the abuse these roads are taking and the millions of dollars of needed repairs.

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Folks,

 

This is indeed turning out to being an interesting thread.

 

Folks have brought up some interesting info regarding out-of-Texas folks and the "self-certification" and the $1.25 / month cost seems within some RV budgets.

 

Perhaps the most "interesting conditions" are the RV's that have become somewhat "rooted into permanent spaces at RV parks".....it seems that the RV parks and the state of Texas desires that these folks "uproot themselves" at least once a year and travel to the trailer inspection station so that they are safe to be.............be a........to be a safe stationary trailer in the RV park unti.........until they "uproot-for-safety-next-year".........interesting???

 

If the "rooted RV trailers" need to remove skirting and hire a bob-tail trailer mover just seems prudent to maybe just set-aside $50 to $100 / month to just get a turn-key round-trip for the safety check....

 

In some states, mobile homes are titled and registered as trailers, but IF firmly "rooted" to the ground (anchored to an approved foundation) then these trailers become non-trailer homes and often are taxed as homes. Can a "fixed" trailer in Texas become exempt from the yearly safety inspection trip.....do RV park owners approve of non-registered RV's in the park?

 

 

Interesting.....

 

Dollytrolley

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You only have to register a trailer, or any vehicle if it is going to be operated on a public highway. And inspected at least in Texas. As far as the unregistered "rooted" trailer in an RV park, or private property for that matter, whether it is taxed by the local taxing authority is anything but consistent in Texas, or any other state for that matter.

The self certification thing should be straightforward, particularly if you have Livingston address, the Polk county tax office is well aware of the deal, and will probably hand out registrations without the prior inspections freely. If you are in the state or somewhere else and don't have any intention of putting the trailer or vehicle on the highway, don't register it that year. PA has 5 year trailer plates just for this reason. Some tractor trailers license plates are permanent, they never expire.

 

As far as the inspections go, the ones that I have had are purely operational. The guy drives it around the parking lot, checks the lights and the horns. If he doesn't hit anything it passes. I prefer to go to places that don't do repairs, like quicky oil change places that don't have any skin in the game. There have been many studies done to determine the effectiveness of annual inspections. Since the vast majority of accidents are caused by the driver and not a mechanical failure, there is no real difference in accident rates between states that do and don't.

 

Coming from PA, where they take all 4 wheels off, and go over the car with a microscope, it is a pleasant change to deal with the minor TX thing. PA used to require a state inspection every 6 months. The United Association of Automobile Mechanics, Tire Changers and Car Washers lobby tried their best to keep it that way. Just a money grab....

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Rick,

 

Gotta agree with you. My state (Tennessee) has no vehicle or trailer inspections and there is some real junk on the road here. Two points though. I tried googling what I consider a basic question. Does annual vehicle inspection increase highway safety? I got no hits on any comparative studies saying yay or nay, so if anyone has any I would appreciate seeing them. Secondly, I was raised in Texas and maybe things have changed since I moved fifteen years ago but the inspections were not standardized from station to station and not really sure there was any real oversight by any enforcement agency. Anecdotally, my last two pickup inspections before moving consisted of scraping off the old sticker and putting on a new one and taking my $$. I made the statement to the tech at the last one " you've got to be kidding" and his reply was "I could tell when you drove in you were going to pass". I made him remove the sticker and went elsewhere where I still got only a cursory exam. Moral to my story. I am in favor of inspections if they increase safety and if they are standardized and spot checks are made like health departments do with food inspections.

We have spent the first part of winter in South Texas since 1992, that is late September thru February. South Padre Island to Big Bend, then head west to the desert. In 1996, we bought land in Zapata (Falcon Lake), and until about 2009, I didn't even know I was to have the trailer inspected! I did have our truck, and cars inspected some of the time. It is really a joke. I have noticed cars with a currant tag, and a 10-12 year old safety sticker running up and down the road. I think half the vehicles in Laredo have an outdated tag, inspection sticker, a driver with no license, plus NO INSURANCE. Many years ago in Kansas they tried the inspection thing, and found it didn't work. Like I said on a post on "Internet on the road" forum, you can't legislate morals, or common sense. Just sayin'. Dick T

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Basically you have a law that is very rarely enforced now being tied to your annual registration. Even for automobiles the law is rarely enforced. So by combining the registration to inspection they have in a round about way levied a new tax. While not really a new tax they now collecting money that they previously were not. The change in the law now has you paying the states part of the inspection fee directly to the state now instead of paying it when you actually have the vehicle inspected. I would not be at all surprised if you fill out the affidavit that you are out of state at time of renewal that they state now will still collect their annual inspections fee even thou you have not been inspected. See making money where they were not before. New tax without having to call it one.

 

As for the inspection itself it is a joke. Last time I had the trailer inspected, about 3 years ago, all they did was look out the bay door to see if I actually had one. The truck/trailer were parked in the street with the 4-ways flashing. The first time he stepped up to the trailer was when he applied the new sticker to it.

 

Knowing of the change in the law, back in December I traded in a 7k tandem axel flat bed trailer for a 14k trailer. One of the reasons for the trade to get rid of the old trailer was it did not have trailer brakes. While the odds are in my favor that when I went to get it inspected the inspector would not even know, I did not want to push my luck. Oh and the brand new trailer that I traded in for at 14k# did not have an inspection sticker on it but does have brakes.

 

This new law it really going to make getting an inspection a pain in the a$$. Personally between personal & work vehicles I have 8 different vehicles/trailers registered with the Texas DMV. Only one of the trailers is under 4500# and exempt. A few years back I realized all but one of the vehicles requiring a inspection sticker had expired stickers but all had valid registrations. Even Big5er gave me crap at the HDT Rally because of the expired sticker on the Jeep. I asked him why? I never drive it on Texas Roads (well very rarely). Now I have to have them all inspected prior to registration and since everybody else is going to have to do the same I would expect longer lines at the inspection stations.

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If you do the self certify thing, get the registration sticker on the window, no one will have an inspection sticker on the window, you won't either. The only way to see if your inspection is current is for the LEO to run your plate, which he can do while he is following you, but unlikely. The license plate readers on the various toll roads could be set up to pick you off, but again they don't have the manpower to chase you. The most likely scenario is during a traffic stop, At least with the old inspection sticker on the window the LEO could see the numbers, say while you were parked on the street or at an intersection. Now the enforcement is likely going to be even more lax, I will let 5'er weigh in on that.

North Carolina did the same combination thing a few years ago. I agree it is ALL about the money, has nothing to do with safety.

 

I looked at the various classes of situations for self certification. How are they going to determine if you are a "seasonal" Texan or not? And as the law rolls out, state reps are going to get calls from other classes of people which will have to be included.

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Thank you for the info, I have had cattle and 16 foot flat trailers in Texas for more then 41 years and

they are well over the weight limit listed above and I have never had any of then inspected! My fiver gets inspected about once a year

but I have not even worried if it was overdue and it has been a number of times, it only cost $14.50. My other trailers are farm trailers

and they only cost $7 per year to register and now, or they should always have been, inspected for $14.50 per year.

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Doing more research on this, I find there are literally hundreds of service garages, RV dealers and Oil change centers certified to do the inspections in Texas.

It would not be a leap to have the RV service dude come to the park and issue the inspection should the equipment not be very mobile.If not available locally,

just get certified to do inspections, and issue it to yourself. A quick airplane ride over a trailer park should be good enough to issue certs to the whole group. :blink:

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Even Big5er gave me crap at the HDT Rally because of the expired sticker on the Jeep. I asked him why? I never drive it on Texas Roads (well very rarely). Now I have to have them all inspected prior to registration and since everybody else is going to have to do the same I would expect longer lines at the inspection stations.

I woulda made up something else to give you crap about if you hadn't supplied the excuse. :) I don't what you are complaining about now either. With your collection of trailers and the HDT bed, you should be able to load up 5 or 6 of your vehicles and make one big trip to the inspection station :lol: It's not like you have anything else like working on your new property or going on vacation to worry about. B)

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I believe that the inspection is a good idea. That being said, the individual RV parks in their particular governmental entity ( city, county ) have rules which their taxes are based on. If the park has it's own rules about the "RV" be deemed "road worthy" as in licensed then it would be up to them to enforce these rules. If the park does not care if the trailers in their parkare not kept current, then don't renew your registration and DON'T take it on the road. Seems simple to me.

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I woulda made up something else to give you crap about if you hadn't supplied the excuse. :) I don't what you are complaining about now either. With your collection of trailers and the HDT bed, you should be able to load up 5 or 6 of your vehicles and make one big trip to the inspection station :lol: It's not like you have anything else like working on your new property or going on vacation to worry about. B)

 

Not all of us have a government job and all the time in the world. Some of us work for a living. :)

 

Plus as luck would have it they are almost all different months. So there is the whole 90 day window thingy.

 

As for the construction nothing got done in the Month of Feb and so far the first week of March. Mother Nature has been providing us with very much needed rain but the timing stinks! Woke up to 4" of snow and sunshine yesterday. First time I have seen the sun in over 2 weeks!

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Beyerjf,

 

Very interesting thoughts in your comments.

 

In one of the deleted comments early in this thread, one of the more expert members mentioned the word "COMPLIANCE" related to the application of this "trailer-safety-inspection" mandate.

 

In a previous-life I had to attend "recurrent training" every 6 months at the most exclusive flight training center in the world, and as such, we pilots were subjected to INTENSE safety training days lasting 14 hours were not uncommon. Compliance safety inspections were the target of much detailed study in that history indicates that MANY people often become very "comforted" by having a newly safety inspected (and stickered) machine placed in their care. The sad fact is that history has proven, time and time again, that "feel-good-compliance-safety-inspections" can actually degrade safety by giving false sense of "all-is-well" regarding machinery when often less-than-proper inspection methods ( or non-inspections) are glossed over during "compliance inspections". Were we trained to ignore "compliance inspections" .........no, ...we were actually instructed to be very critical of these "mini-inspections".

The "potential problem" with "compliance inspections" tends to be that many, many times they really give a false sense of comfort when a "real detailed inspection" may likely uncover problems passed over .........

 

The ropeing season is in full swing here in Wickenburg, AZ so for the last couple months thousands of trailers of every size and shape you could imagine are flocking every day on the roads around here. Every state and every part of Canada and some from Mexico are mixed into the trailer flock and it is pretty obvious that for the VAST majority of trailer operations "compliance" is a very minor part of the trailer problems encountered.

 

If you look around it seems that tires, brakes, axle bearing and lights make up most of the trailer problems and you might say well that supports the compliance inspection theory and in some instances some problems are identified and that is good..... but it is HIGHLY UNLIKELY that these inspections can catch much more than what would be identified by a decent pre-trip inspection that is required everytime we tow.

 

Perhaps I am less trusting in trailers and government inspections in general, but I have found that IF I do not keep a sharp eye on the machinery around me I may not catch the little problems before they grow into bigger problems so at the end of the day we are the real inspectors that count.

 

The devil is still in the details and poor inspections let the devil in..............

 

Dollytrolley

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