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Crossing into Canada since July 1, 2018?


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15 hours ago, richfaa said:

Can not remember how many times we have been back And forth  across the border but only with Pennsylvania or Ohio plates. I do believe that we have been asked if we have firearms aboard as a standard on a list of questions.

Same with me Rich.  I'm in Grand Marais, MN right now and will be crossing into Canada today.  I would be surprised if they didn't ask the firearms question.

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41 minutes ago, Ropeshaft said:

I would be surprised if they didn't ask the firearms question.

And that happens because the US has far fewer restrictions on firearms than does Canada and what state you are from has little to do with it. I consider what they ask to be a courtesy as it helps me to avoid violating the laws of my host country, just as I expect Canadians to abide by US laws when they visit us. 

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46 minutes ago, Kirk Wood said:

And that happens because the US has far fewer restrictions on firearms than does Canada and what state you are from has little to do with it. I consider what they ask to be a courtesy as it helps me to avoid violating the laws of my host country, just as I expect Canadians to abide by US laws when they visit us. 

This is also my take on the gun  questions.  Many of us have a firearm and IMO Rv'ers are more likely to have a firearm than others.Having a firearm is no big deal to those who have them and we may forget that we have them aboard. The question is standard and a reminder that  Oh yes we do have one aboard and we can take action before we cross the border and get into serious trouble. We are glad they ask the question although we are well aware of Canadian laws on firearms.

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Crossed over at Roosville, MT. into B.C. this afternoon. It was basically the same as always, "What state is vehicle licensed in, where are you going (only about 10 miles up the road), any guns or ammo, when were the kayaks in the water last time, any alcohol? If you go a little further than 10 miles you will have to stop at a boat inspection station". Thank you and have a good day.

 Came back thru into US about 30 minutes later. More of the usual, "where did you go, did you buy anything (Hawkins Cheezies), how long were you in CA"? He sort of chuckled the reason for the trip. "Thank you and have a good day". Then about 75' further was the Montana boat inspection check point which used to be about 5 miles south at the junction of US 93 and Montana 37.

I needed my Hawkins Cheezies fix as some of our Canadian friends bring me a supply to Yuma, AZ. in the winter. I found out there was a Mom and Pop c-store at Grassmere, B.C. which is only about 10 miles from the border. Now I'm good to go for a "little" while.

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I remember one time we were returning from CA and saw a new-looking MH sitting in a vacant lot beside the U.S.A. checkpoint. Outside sat two elderly couples on a pile of luggage and other stuff. Don't have any idea what the agents were searching for but it looked terribly uncomfortable for the couples sitting there in the hot sun.

Point is, insure you know and understand entry laws for CA and U.S.A.

Edited by Ray,IN
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8 hours ago, noteven said:

Is it just me or are trade tariffs on goods that are not widely available or made in your home country another kind a tax? 

Sometimes, not always.  Take, for example, Canada's tariff on USA milk products.  Canada imposes a tariff of 250% to 295% on cheese and butter imported from the USA.  This tariff is not a tax, as nobody imports cheese or butter from the USA.  In effect, it is to protect the dairy industry in Canada.

Now, if like you say, there was no dairy industry in Canada, then you could view such a tariff as a tax.  However, that situation does not exist and Canada would not impose a tariff in such a case.

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1 hour ago, chirakawa said:

Sometimes, not always.  Take, for example, Canada's tariff on USA milk products.  Canada imposes a tariff of 250% to 295% on cheese and butter imported from the USA.  This tariff is not a tax, as nobody imports cheese or butter from the USA.  In effect, it is to protect the dairy industry in Canada.

Now, if like you say, there was no dairy industry in Canada, then you could view such a tariff as a tax.  However, that situation does not exist and Canada would not impose a tariff in such a case.

https://www.wisconsinagriculturist.com/dairy/does-canada-really-charge-270-tariff-milk

According to this article the tariff is on US products is two part. 7.5% on quota sales and the very high numbers for non quota.

The article states the trade ratio with Canada for dairy is 2:1 in favor of US.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, noteven said:

https://www.wisconsinagriculturist.com/dairy/does-canada-really-charge-270-tariff-milk

According to this article the tariff is on US products is two part. 7.5% on quota sales and the very high numbers for non quota.

The article states the trade ratio with Canada for dairy is 2:1 in favor of US.

 

 

 

Which means that Canada has a dairy industry and the tariffs are there to protect it.  If Canada had no dairy industry, then it would fit your example.  I can't think of any product which fits your example, do you know of one?

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3 hours ago, chirakawa said:

Sometimes, not always.  Take, for example, Canada's tariff on USA milk products.  Canada imposes a tariff of 250% to 295% on cheese and butter imported from the USA.  This tariff is not a tax, as nobody imports cheese or butter from the USA.  In effect, it is to protect the dairy industry in Canada.

Now, if like you say, there was no dairy industry in Canada, then you could view such a tariff as a tax.  However, that situation does not exist and Canada would not impose a tariff in such a case.

Tarriffs are always a 'tax' on consumers of those products.  And your example is incorrect, Canada does import all types of dairy products from USA.  The tariff makes USA dairy products more expensive so few people in Canada buy those products but buy the cheaper Canadian butter and cheese.   Take a look on the 'duty' or tariff on wine! It is huge and why Canadians don't take cases of California wines back with them each spring,  and why we usually don't go into Canada as we carry more wine than they allow.

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6 minutes ago, Barbaraok said:

The tariff makes USA dairy products more expensive so few people in Canada buy those products but buy the cheaper Canadian butter and cheese.

1

Generally, the purpose is to make cheaper imported products cost as much or more than those made locally to protect the local from foreign competition. But they can also be used as a tool for retaliation. This happens when one of our products is being subjected to a heavy tariff in a country that we sell to so we, in turn, apply an equally heavy tariff to some different product that country sells in large quantity here to damage their ability to sell in our markets. 

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10 minutes ago, Barbaraok said:

Tarriffs are always a 'tax' on consumers of those products.  And your example is incorrect, Canada does import all types of dairy products from USA.  The tariff makes USA dairy products more expensive so few people in Canada buy those products but buy the cheaper Canadian butter and cheese.   Take a look on the 'duty' or tariff on wine! It is huge and why Canadians don't take cases of California wines back with them each spring,  and why we usually don't go into Canada as we carry more wine than they allow.

Yes, it is a tax, but not in the way that he presented it.  His premise was that it was a tax on products which are not made or readily available in the home country.  I was trying to give an example where that it is not the case.  When I stated " This tariff is not a tax, as nobody imports cheese or butter from the USA", I left out the word "if" in "as if nobody imports.........".

You stated " The tariff makes USA dairy products more expensive so few people in Canada buy those products".  According to the link he posted, Canadians buy USA dairy products 2 to 1 over Canadian diary products.

My suggestion was, and still is, that tariffs are used to protect home industries.  It is the tax feature of the tariff that accomplishes this goal.

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