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How do I get my new truck home?


13speed

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So my new truck in the other thread I started is in Georgia. The dealer says that GA does not give temp tags for commercial vehicles. WA where I live only gives 3 day temp tags good only in WA. I can pre pay the truck without seeing it and pay the sales tax and plate fees but then I am out the money if the deal falls through roughly $4500.00. Although I believe this to be a great truck I am not willing to take that kind of risk. Thoughts?

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1. You can hire delivery companies but might cost about half of above cost. I had mine delivered and cost about $1.00 per mile. 2. Might broker a deal with the dealer for delivery. 3. Find a local driving school or friend with CDL you could pay to drive. 4. Look at truck,buy it,and drive it home. Not a great option but has been done.

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Are you planning on registering it as an RV? If do ask them yo remove commercial hitch and see if they will give a temporary tag for a non commercial vehicle.

 

You could also try (after removing) hitch,) putting signs in it saying "in transit" or something to that effect and drive it home. We did that on the truck we bought in TX and brought home to MN but we also asked previous owner if he could leave plates on and we would send them back which we did.

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1. You can hire delivery companies but might cost about half of above cost. I had mine delivered and cost about $1.00 per mile. 2. Might broker a deal with the dealer for delivery. 3. Find a local driving school or friend with CDL you could pay to drive. 4. Look at truck,buy it,and drive it home. Not a great option but has been done.

 

I was told 1.00 or better per mile round trip. I am 2600 miles away :wacko: One way and I would do it.

 

i would just do the WA temp tag....

That option is still on the list......

 

Are you planning on registering it as an RV? If do ask them yo remove commercial hitch and see if they will give a temporary tag for a non commercial vehicle.

 

You could also try (after removing) hitch,) putting signs in it saying "in transit" or something to that effect and drive it home. We did that on the truck we bought in TX and brought home to MN but we also asked previous owner if he could leave plates on and we would send them back which we did.

 

 

No. it will be registered as a private truck. I am actually using the commercial hitch as the current plan is to build a Spacecraft Semi trailer. I am buying from a dealer so no borrowed plates.

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Assuming a good portion of the $4500 is Washington sales/use tax, I'd consider registering it temporarily as a non-resident in Georgia or another state along the way. Most have requirements that a vehicle be registered if it's there for longer than a certain period of time--it looks like Georgia requires you to register there if you're going to be there more than 30 days--so if the deal goes through, you might be able to pay their sales tax, get a Georgia tag (maybe even a 30-day or other temporary tag), and then re-register in WA with a credit for the tax you paid to Georgia.

 

You might also inquire with a "normal" car dealer who regularly issues temporary tags to buyers purchasing from out of state (look for a big seller located in Georgia on eBay as a start)--you might be able to get a hold of someone who knows that system and how to get you something that will work, maybe even paying them a fee to do the work for you.

 

Alternatively, many states (not sure about WA) will offer a same-day mailing of tags, and can overnight them to you. It might cost you a night in Georgia and the shipping, but spending $200-300 is probably a lot more reasonable than risking $4500 if the deal falls through.

 

The temporary licensing thing can be a hassle when crossing state lines--there was no way to do it completely legally when I bought a car in Maryland a few years back. SD has a really simple system where the seller (including private sellers) can print out a temporary permit and report the sale of the vehicle, but Maryland only issued a temporary tag to a buyer on applying for registration (which they admitted was required as a nonresident if I was there for so many days, but that they had never done it and didn't care to). The Maryland DMV was shocked that SD would allow the tag to be "just printed out", and SD was surprised that Maryland could make it so complicated. In the end, the seller had a lien on the title, and Maryland had an ad valorem tax that didn't stop until the tags were returned, so me driving off on the seller's tags gave me what I needed as well as a bit of collateral to make sure he sent the title in a timely manner. I know that doesn't work for you in this case, just thought I'd share.

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Assuming a good portion of the $4500 is Washington sales/use tax, I'd consider registering it temporarily as a non-resident in Georgia or another state along the way. Most have requirements that a vehicle be registered if it's there for longer than a certain period of time--it looks like Georgia requires you to register there if you're going to be there more than 30 days--so if the deal goes through, you might be able to pay their sales tax, get a Georgia tag (maybe even a 30-day or other temporary tag), and then re-register in WA with a credit for the tax you paid to Georgia.

 

You might also inquire with a "normal" car dealer who regularly issues temporary tags to buyers purchasing from out of state (look for a big seller located in Georgia on eBay as a start)--you might be able to get a hold of someone who knows that system and how to get you something that will work, maybe even paying them a fee to do the work for you.

 

Alternatively, many states (not sure about WA) will offer a same-day mailing of tags, and can overnight them to you. It might cost you a night in Georgia and the shipping, but spending $200-300 is probably a lot more reasonable than risking $4500 if the deal falls through.

 

The temporary licensing thing can be a hassle when crossing state lines--there was no way to do it completely legally when I bought a car in Maryland a few years back. SD has a really simple system where the seller (including private sellers) can print out a temporary permit and report the sale of the vehicle, but Maryland only issued a temporary tag to a buyer on applying for registration (which they admitted was required as a nonresident if I was there for so many days, but that they had never done it and didn't care to). The Maryland DMV was shocked that SD would allow the tag to be "just printed out", and SD was surprised that Maryland could make it so complicated. In the end, the seller had a lien on the title, and Maryland had an ad valorem tax that didn't stop until the tags were returned, so me driving off on the seller's tags gave me what I needed as well as a bit of collateral to make sure he sent the title in a timely manner. I know that doesn't work for you in this case, just thought I'd share.

 

 

I really don't want to pay WA any sales tax. $4263 of the $4586 is all sales tax. We are moving to a low to no sales tax state to avoid that issue with the trailer. I was just going to wait to register it till then. These greedy assed states with their high sales taxes make it hard for a average person to afford anything nice.

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Nice looking truck. As suggested put a plastic tempera plate on " IN TRANSENT" Be sure you have insurance in place on the truck and drive it from point A to point B. Have all the sales paper work with you, so when asked/stopped you can prove the truck is not stolen. Take the fifth wheel plate off would be good for DOT. Now if it were me... I would stop at scales..... so there is no questions about the truck, BUT the driver should have CDL with health card current, with him.. Be sure the dealer give you a current DOT truck inspection sheet, completed form. The look's of this nice truck, it should pass with flying color. And when it comes to buying fuel....and fuel road tax.....".NON COMERICAL" " PERSONAL" " PRIVETLY OWNED" well.... just don't stop at a truck stop to get fuel. Smaller stations have fuel also and stay away from road tax questions. l...... You can pay your tax's when you get home. Good luck OU812

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13 speed,

 

If you register the truck in Washington, you "will" pay sales tax.

I did the three day from Texas to Washington, even though it took 9 days. You can also buy trip permits for each state crossed, if needed.

 

Taxes are a fact of life, to the hones t folks!

 

Curt

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I really don't want to pay WA any sales tax. $4263 of the $4586 is all sales tax. We are moving to a low to no sales tax state to avoid that issue with the trailer. I was just going to wait to register it till then. These greedy assed states with their high sales taxes make it hard for a average person to afford anything nice.

 

I think the biggest hurdle in getting a temporary tag is the fact that you do not intend to register the vehicle. Basically some states want to know they are getting their registration money before allowing a temporary tag to be issued.

 

A buddy of mine had his truck die on him on a business trip. He opted to purchase a new one instead of repairing his old one. The dealer he purchased from (think it was Iowa but been too many years now to remember) would/could only issue the temporary/buyers tag if they collected registration fees. He could get one from Texas, our home state, but even that required him to jump thru a few hoops too if I remember correctly. In the end since his vanity plates from his old truck were going to end up on the new one once it was registered anyways, he just slapped them on and took his chances. But if stopped it could have gotten sticky.

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Having a floating title is potentially a problem. I would try to get an address in the state you want to use

before you take possession. It makes things a lot less messy. When you buy from a licensed dealer,

they are bound to collect sales tax or show proof of delivery to another state. In other words, they will

complete the sale to the address you provide. If you address is in a state that looks for tax dodges, even

if you register in another state, they may seek taxes regardless of where you register it. Having an open title

while living in a state where in X number of days you are bound to tile and register a vehicle is how this situation is triggered.

 

If you are thinking about an LLC, consider the ramifications from your former state of residence as well.

 

Steve

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We bought ours in IN, negotiated with the private seller to deliver it to OR via his commercial plates, with us paying the hotel/air fare return trip for the his hired CDL driver. Once we took delivery, all signage and the commercial hitch were removed, then we remotely registered it in SD as a non-commercial truck. If you haven't signed the contract yet, start negotiating for a delivery of the truck. $2600 x 2 is outrageous.

 

Regards

Gemstone

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Whatever you do, DON'T register the truck in Georgia to get a tag and count on getting credit for taxes in Washington. Georgia has a "title fee" in lieu of a sales tax and you will not get credit for it anywhere. That "title fee" is also imposed upon you if you move to Georgia and have owned your vehicle for years. You will basically pay sales tax again on a vehicle you already own.

 

As far as the other question, I bought our first truck in Texas, had a temp tag in the windshield but was never stopped. The second was bought in TN and was driven home with a temp tag as well. You should be able to get one in Georgia even on a commercial vehicle. Here is a link to that info:

 

https://dor.georgia.gov/information-about-dealers-issuing-temporary-tags

 

Edit:

 

The temp tag will be good for 30 days. I would have them remove the DOT numbers and any other signs, company logos, etc from the truck before starting home. As long as you have a license that is good for a non commercial private truck (IE a non commercial CDL) you should be good to go. As noted in another thread, have pictures of what you are going to do with the truck in case you are stopped and have your insurance info, bill of sale and other paperwork in order.

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13 speed,

 

If you register the truck in Washington, you "will" pay sales tax.

I did the three day from Texas to Washington, even though it took 9 days. You can also buy trip permits for each state crossed, if needed.

 

Taxes are a fact of life, to the hones t folks!

 

Curt

I pay them plenty of taxes...When I sell my house I have to pay them a 2% fee on the whole thing so I am not going to feel bad if I can get away with something.

 

 

I think the biggest hurdle in getting a temporary tag is the fact that you do not intend to register the vehicle. Basically some states want to know they are getting their registration money before allowing a temporary tag to be issued.

 

A buddy of mine had his truck die on him on a business trip. He opted to purchase a new one instead of repairing his old one. The dealer he purchased from (think it was Iowa but been too many years now to remember) would/could only issue the temporary/buyers tag if they collected registration fees. He could get one from Texas, our home state, but even that required him to jump thru a few hoops too if I remember correctly. In the end since his vanity plates from his old truck were going to end up on the new one once it was registered anyways, he just slapped them on and took his chances. But if stopped it could have gotten sticky.

I am just not sure what to do at this point. I was going to bring it home and park it while I figure things out. I guess to get a title I have to register it and pay taxes?

 

Having a floating title is potentially a problem. I would try to get an address in the state you want to use

before you take possession. It makes things a lot less messy. When you buy from a licensed dealer,

they are bound to collect sales tax or show proof of delivery to another state. In other words, they will

complete the sale to the address you provide. If you address is in a state that looks for tax dodges, even

if you register in another state, they may seek taxes regardless of where you register it. Having an open title

while living in a state where in X number of days you are bound to tile and register a vehicle is how this situation is triggered.

 

If you are thinking about an LLC, consider the ramifications from your former state of residence as well.

 

Steve

I probably can not get away from it on the truck but I will be damned if they are going to get one nickel on the trailer. I will move first before taking position.

 

We bought ours in IN, negotiated with the private seller to deliver it to OR via his commercial plates, with us paying the hotel/air fare return trip for the his hired CDL driver. Once we took delivery, all signage and the commercial hitch were removed, then we remotely registered it in SD as a non-commercial truck. If you haven't signed the contract yet, start negotiating for a delivery of the truck. $2600 x 2 is outrageous.

 

Regards

Gemstone

 

How do I register it in SD without being there or having a address?

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Whatever you do, DON'T register the truck in Georgia to get a tag and count on getting credit for taxes in Washington. Georgia has a "title fee" in lieu of a sales tax and you will not get credit for it anywhere. That "title fee" is also imposed upon you if you move to Georgia and have owned your vehicle for years. You will basically pay sales tax again on a vehicle you already own.

 

As far as the other question, I bought our first truck in Texas, had a temp tag in the windshield but was never stopped. The second was bought in TN and was driven home with a temp tag as well. You should be able to get one in Georgia even on a commercial vehicle. Here is a link to that info:

 

https://dor.georgia.gov/information-about-dealers-issuing-temporary-tags

 

Edit:

 

The temp tag will be good for 30 days. I would have them remove the DOT numbers and any other signs, company logos, etc from the truck before starting home. As long as you have a license that is good for a non commercial private truck (IE a non commercial CDL) you should be good to go. As noted in another thread, have pictures of what you are going to do with the truck in case you are stopped and have your insurance info, bill of sale and other paperwork in order.

 

The dealer said GA did not give them for commercial vehicles. Is he just being lazy and lying or correct? He is the GM not a typical sales guy.

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I will verify the temp tag issue with a buddy of mine at the Freightliner dealer tomorrow. As long as you are going to register as a private, non commercial truck, you be able to get a temp.

 

 

I appreciate it. I will check this thread but if you would PM me as well so I will get a email. It will be non commercial.

 

Am I not going to be in your neck of the woods? What direction would be the better rout?

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I was told 1.00 or better per mile round trip. I am 2600 miles away :wacko: One way and I would do it.

 

 

That option is still on the list......

 

 

 

 

No. it will be registered as a private truck. I am actually using the commercial hitch as the current plan is to build a Spacecraft Semi trailer. I am buying from a dealer so no borrowed plates.

 

We used cold iron companies in Tennessee (865) 686-7703. We had them transport from TN to CA for $2600
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Piggyback transport could solve most of your problems......(Piggyback is where the tow-tractor tows three or less tractors that simply ride steer axle on the back of the tractor in front and the towed-tractor(s) has the rear drive axle shafts removed and it becomes a non-drive-tag axle).

 

Piggybacks are crawling all over the USA everyday.......once in a while a owner / operator with a long bobtail run will take a custom piggyback run to defray expenses so that could be a win win for you and the piggyback operator.

 

Piggyback is easy on the towed tractor(s) with only the back driver tires getting a few extra miles the rest of your tractor is just along for the ride.....the towing tractors Insurance, tags and CDL driver are providing all required paperwork......

 

Likely your dealer has various piggyback operators in his smart phone speed dialer........

 

Drive on.......(Piggyback.....home)

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We used cold iron companies in Tennessee (865) 686-7703. We had them transport from TN to CA for $2600

I will give them a call.

 

Piggyback transport could solve most of your problems......(Piggyback is where the tow-tractor tows three or less tractors that simply ride steer axle on the back of the tractor in front and the towed-tractor(s) has the rear drive axle shafts removed and it becomes a non-drive-tag axle).

 

Piggybacks are crawling all over the USA everyday.......once in a while a owner / operator with a long bobtail run will take a custom piggyback run to defray expenses so that could be a win win for you and the piggyback operator.

 

Piggyback is easy on the towed tractor(s) with only the back driver tires getting a few extra miles the rest of your tractor is just along for the ride.....the towing tractors Insurance, tags and CDL driver are providing all required paperwork......

 

Likely your dealer has various piggyback operators in his smart phone speed dialer........

 

Drive on.......(Piggyback.....home)

 

Yes that would be better than having someone living in my freshly detailed truck. The only issue is that I need to go to Spacecraft to see about building my Spaceship and that is tough to work into the trip. I guess I could fly to KC then drive to Concordia and then drive back to KC then fly from KC to PDX???.....Im to old for this crap and I'm not even that old :blink:

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If you decide to drive it home, which I would, then buy a trucker road atlas and go around any scales to eliminate that added risk. Truck drivers do it all the time. I once drove commercially for 13 months without hitting a scale even though I was always legal, I like keeping the risk factor low.

Edit - You should not have to go through scales correct, but do you really want to risk being chased down for a closer look? Scales are a lot more than just weight, they want to check your log books and equipment. At least put a large sign on the doors ( NOT FOR HIRE). You can also check out Truckers Path app on your phone for scale status. Driving a HDT commercially or recreationally is a different ball game with a different set of rules from a pickup.

Greg

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