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As far as being able to tell if rig is level, I have stick on bubble levels in each corner. I use those for a preliminary setup. Once I am in place, I always confirm level by using a 2 foot level in various places, since the bubble levels can get knocked out of place.

 

For actually leveling, in the past I've used some of the commercial plastic things, but I've found it is much easier to use 2x8 boards, cut to various lengths, with the ends cut at 45 degree angle to allow an easy drive up. A long one for both tires (dual axle) and a short one if I only need to lift one axle. And some that are stackable in case I need more height, also in various lengths. Granted, they take up a little more space in the back of my truck and they weigh a little more, but they work well.

 

Hope that helps.

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The easiest way, in my opinion, would be using an automatic leveling system. We had a 6 pad "Big Foot" system installed on our 5th wheel at their facility in White Pigeon, MI. It cost around $4500 a couple years ago. 4 cylinders/legs would be a bit less.

 

It remembers what level is and lowers the hydraulic legs to put the RV level at the push of a button essentially.

 

Jim

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Since your profile says Excel, I'm going to guess that you have a fifth wheel. If you you can either use leveling blocks, store bought or home made or you can get a leveling system installed. More specifics of what you are looking for would help.

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We got a set of Anderson Levelers and have been pleased with them. I also mounted a bubble level on the front of the camper. We put the Anderesons down and then I pull forward while watching the bubble. When it shows level I lock the parking brake and lock it all down. I call them my "poor man's power leveling system" since the truck does all the work.

 

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We carry three bags of the orange Lynx Levelers. I place the trailer on the site where we intend to park, and look at a large steel ball level that is bolted to the pin box of our fifth wheel and easily visible from the drivers seat of the truck. The level has gradations marked on it, and based on those gradations I can tell how much the low side needs to be raised. Based on that I'll tell my wife "One layer (of Lynx Levelers) under each tire" or "One level under one and two under the other". We've done this enough that I get it right the first time about 90%, and if not it is a simple manner of adding an additional layer under a tire. Once the left-to-right is taken care of we level front to back with the landing gear.

 

We find it a simple process that takes no more than a minute or two. I occasionally use some of the leveling blocks under my rear stabilizer jacks if the ground is soft, low, or uneven. And I've made simple ramps out of them to raise the truck to change oil or just get underneath. I've also used them on occasion for sewer hose support in challenging situations. Overall I find them pretty versatile.

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We carry three bags of the orange Lynx Levelers.

If you go this route, be sure to get the orange Lynx Levelers (http://www.amazon.com/Tri-Lynx-00015-Lynx-Levelers-Pack/dp/B0028PJ10K), NOT the yellow ones (http://www.campingworld.com/shopping/item/rv-leveling-blocks-10-pack/56865)

 

We've had both and most of the yellow levelers didn't make it through the first travel season. We now have the Lynx levelers, which we've had for several years now.

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Excel 5th wheel - double axle.

I almost bought the Andersen levelers, but read a lot about them breaking and slipping.
How much do you weigh?
Have you had any problems?

 

I think they're rated for 30,000 lbs. They certainly look heavy enough to take almost anything. And no, no problems, no breaking and no slipping at all.

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I think they're rated for 30,000 lbs. They certainly look heavy enough to take almost anything. And no, no problems, no breaking and no slipping at all.

 

X2. Although I have "heard" of some folks having issues with slippage on concrete. The "go to" remedy seemed to be to run a couple of lag screws into the bottom of the ramp with heads slightly protruding to add "traction".

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I think they're rated for 30,000 lbs. They certainly look heavy enough to take almost anything. And no, no problems, no breaking and no slipping at all.

 

I agree. I guess the camper might "spit" one out on really smooth concrete, but I'm not sure even that would do it since they "rock" as you mount them.

 

My only issue was that my Hitchhiker axles are very close together and I couldn't get one of the Anderson's between the tires. The instructions said you could cut off up to 4 inches and that's about what I ended up cutting off. Now, there's a bit of a "lift" when I first pull up onto them. That means that I can't use them for just a small amount of lift - I have to want at least, say, a half inch or more. It's no big deal though. Just once did I happen to hit the "sweet spot" and need to put one of my thinnest boards under each tire instead of use the Andersons. Most of the time when it's that minor I can move the camper forward or back a bit and find a level spot and not need any leveling at all.

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Boards, leveling blocks, etc always a hassle.When the auto leveling system came out we got one. Push the button and watch.

 

I agree, but when the choice is Anderson levelers at about $100 or Big Foot at about $2500 (or more) you guess what gets my vote. Now, if I had the opportunity to have the auto levelers on the rig to begin with it would be a "no-brainer".

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It also depends on your rig and where you go. In my 24' conversion van, staying west of the Mississippi River, I did not carry anything for leveling. If the ground was uneven I just moved back and forth until I got within a half a bubble on my circular level with it sitting on the floor.

 

Linda Sand

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I agree, but when the choice is Anderson levelers at about $100 or Big Foot at about $2500 (or more) you guess what gets my vote. Now, if I had the opportunity to have the auto levelers on the rig to begin with it would be a "no-brainer".

Ours came OEM on the 5th wheel but it was a determining factor in the purchase.

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We started using 2x8 boards that I had sittiing around the house from various projects. Only problem was that if the ground was really uneven the boards could crack under the weight of out trailer (32' cougar 5er) During my travels I kept an eye out for thicker lumber and finally found some 2.5" thick boards originally from a wooden bridge deck. I find these will take thee weight without cracking or splitting. I keep 6' and 3' sections in the back of the truck.

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What to put under the wheels to level has been covered well enough already. You'll need at least two curved bubble levels with adhesive backs, and one round bubble level with no adhesive backing.

 

I used the little adhesive bubble levels. I'd use a few pieces of 2X8 and Lynx levelers. The refrigerator lasts much longer if it is level. If it is level then any slight difference in the level of the floors will not be noticeable. If it is you need to talk to the factory about how badly their QC is. With that as my premise when I first get a rig I get two of the curved plastic adhesive backed bubble levels, two of the straight bubble levels, and one round bubble level.

 

I take my new to me rig out to a flat by eye parking lot and disconnect the truck. I put the round bubble in the freezer, on a flat part of the bottom of the freezer compartment, before it has been turned on enough to build up any ice. I first use wood or blocks to get the bubble level as close to perfect as possible. Once I am sure the refrigerator is leveled the rest of the rig always seems to be perfectly level. Nothing but the fridge can be damaged by being off level where it is not noticeable to the eye.

 

The next is for a 5th wheel only. I'd first level it side by side getting out of the truck to place leveling blocks or wood until it is level side to side. Then I disconnect the truck and simply raise or lower the landing gear until they are level in the freezer round bubble too. Once it was level according to the round bubble level in the freezer, I double check the level in the freezer once more and make sure then I am ready to install the adhesive backed curved and straight bubble levels. I clean each location with alcohol before applying the adhesive back of the levels to the rig. I put one level on the side of the fiver up front facing me when I am operating the landing gear switch to move it up and down. that one gives me the level front to rear as set by the landing gear switch raising or lowering the front. I put a second curved level under the overhang front vertical angled wall showing level left to right where I can see it when operating the landing gear switch as it will be on the driver side of the vehicle and be more visible on hopping out of the truck when leveling later at a campsite. Then I place the second straight set under and in the middle of the front wall under the overhang for right to left level and front to rear. This is a back up set, out of the weather and a ready reference if one of the other two primary curved levels move. The second set is not really necessary but I like backups because redoing the level later means defrosting and starting over with the bubble level in the freezer.

 

YMMV, hope that helps. Worked for me with two rigs for our seven years of fulltiming, and now with our part time 28' fiver.

 

Safe travels!

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There is no doubt in my mind that it would be very rare to find anyone who has had a leveling system that would even choose to go RVing without one in the next RV, particularly with larger RVs. But we did get our little travel trailer without a leveling system, which I occasionally wonder if it was a wise choice. It is still rare to find one for the smaller travel trailers, probably due to the cost.

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