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Pre Trip Check List


alan0043

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We have a series of widow-making disasters in recent years in Ontario where I had my CDL.

 

Please read this and get back to this thread about your own personal, stand in front of your creator, obligation to make sure that huge collection of iron is in fact safe to drive down the road in the company of your fellow humans that have a right to get home to their families.

 

End of sermon.

 

http://www.cbc.ca/m/news/canada/toronto/truck-tire-woman-struck-1.3235492

 

Brings tears to my eyes. This happens all the time. The MOT crackdowns help, but after a while its business as usual.

 

Wake up!!

 

It's not what we can get away with, it's what is the safe thing and the right thing. Check you rigs thoroughly and often!!

 

Geo

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Guest THE TRAILERKING

I think Roger and Geo should hold training seminars at various Rallies and gatherings. It would be good refreshers for even the most experienced out there. One can never know too much.

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Geo, wake up, its 4 am. The link doesn't work.

TK, another good list. A couple of explanations.

- minimum 5 seconds b/w HDT and any vehicle in front, more if weather is poor. If someone cuts in front , back off. You can tell if an RV or MH or Commercial driver knows the rules by timing them in your rear view mirror going past a point you just went by.

 

- when going around a rt hand curve, drivers front left wheel should be close to the left or outside of the lane, the Commercial trailer wheels will be closer to the rt side of the lane due to "off track." In my case this is not completely true. The truck pivot point is behind the rear wheel. The trailer pivot point is in the middle of the center of the three trailer wheels. It takes 1.25 lanes to round a 90 degree turn as a Commercial rig takes 2. That is with the Commercial trailers wheels right at the rear and not slid in.

- The reference to speed in a curve is correct. There is a particular corner we went around where if you enter it at the correct speed and are placed correctly in the lane, you have a steady increase of power all thru the turn. By the time you exit the turn, you are just about at hiway speed. By the time you are past the solid line on your left in this case and beside the broken line, you are at hiwy speed and can shift lanes at speed. You can't cross a solid line when merging, only dotted.

 

- this checklist has the tug test, I noted.

- 4 ways can be checked in the cab as the interior indicators are on the same circuit as the exterior lites...so I was told.

- they allow 20 minutes so this must be a condensed version, I'd have to do it to find out.

- backing up for me is easier than backing up a commercial trailer with a conventional tractor as the pivot points are different. I can wag the tail of my trailer by hard left to hard right and little rearward movement.

- When making a 90 degree turn you can cut into an opposing lane if there is no opposing traffic. If opposing traffic has to stop or back up, you fail, back to the barn.

- When turning a 90 degree turn you have to cut off your inside lane with your trailer then just before the corner, straddle the 2 lanes blocking both. When you go, go out to the pile of gravel in the middle of the intersection then turn. Making sure the trailer wheels don't jump the curb or you smoke a cyclist, pole or mailbox or its back to the barn again.

 

The pretrip is one thing but knowing how to drive correctly is another. The exam has 2 parts, both need to be passed. The pretrip needs practice over and over as does the driving route the examiner takes. The route doesn't vary except for construction work enroute. They only allow 2 hrs, in my case, to do the whole exam. 15 minutes prior to pretrip for paperwork, 45 minutes for pretrip and 1 hr for the driving part. = 2 hrs.

 

To the best of my knowledge there are only 4 or 5 HDT's in BC, now 1 fewer with Geo's gone.

 

 

In BC we are allowed 60 demerit points b4 failing..Most get 40 - 45.

 

Re doing a presentation, funny guy.

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Al,

 

I am open to any ideas for the ECR, just have to have a presenter. Is this something you might like to tackle?

 

Carl,

 

This is something that I will have to think about. I don't think that I would be the right person for this job. I have never done a pre-trip check on my truck and trailer. I have only pulled the trailer one time. I do understand mechanical systems. I have only done a walk around the truck and trailer. Because I don't have a pre-trip check list is the reason why I am asking so many questions. I think that there is probably a better person to do the presentation. The big thing is that I have no real experience to pull from. I don't what to answer a question wrong. I can bring with me all the info that I find to the rally. I know this is not the answer that you are looking for.

 

Al

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Alan,

 

I understand your reticence but we could make it a round table discussion so everyone has input. If you tackle the information gathering that would be the basis for a good discussion. As you can see from the spirit of this thread there is a lot of passion as well as dissension and usually the middle ground best fits our particular needs. Maybe a good start would be to gather info as to what inspections would best fit our needs on a yearly, monthly, weekly, and daily basis and then as a group discuss the merits of each.

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If the Habitat job doesn't work out or can be pushed back, I'd be prepared to help. Habitat wants to work 2.5 days a week which not worthwhile. It will take a few days to get an answer on my alternative.

 

Unlike Alan, I'm no techie but I am big on safety. I'm thinking of a plan something like what 442 SAR Squadron does with their SAR Exercises. They have several evaluators making notes on the various members of the team and what and how they did. The evaluators at the end of the simulation would compare notes and come up with a grade.

 

Switching to our situation. We do 3 pretrips as outlined in my earlier post. We go thru the particular pretrip touching shaking, hitting, twisting, pointing to, checking and explaining what we are doing and why. Others with their white labcoat and clipboards could make notes.

 

Pictures and video from different angles at the same time for review purposes.

 

A post inspection round table discussion takes place over several Vodka coolers

 

Modify as needed by law by some states or provinces, do it again with modifications and go to print.

 

It will take a fair bit of time on the part of a number of people with like mind.

 

The hands on could be at the Rally, the rest done over the computer later.

 

The lightest person does the under truck and trailer part. No dumping the air bags.

 

I think the saying goes like,"there is no better way to learn something than to teach it to others".

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Alan,

 

I understand your reticence but we could make it a round table discussion so everyone has input. If you tackle the information gathering that would be the basis for a good discussion. As you can see from the spirit of this thread there is a lot of passion as well as dissension and usually the middle ground best fits our particular needs. Maybe a good start would be to gather info as to what inspections would best fit our needs on a yearly, monthly, weekly, and daily basis and then as a group discuss the merits of each.

 

Carl,

 

I like your idea about the round table discussion. Maybe a late day discussion with some adult beverages could work out. I have been saving the info on pre-trip check lists. I also now have a copy of the Ohio CDL handbook. There is a pre-trip check list in the booklet. With the input from the group maybe we could have a list or too. I am also aware that there is a list in the resource guide. I will consult and look over this list also. I think right now I have 4 different sources that I will consult. It will be interesting what items come up the same from all of the lists. I will bring all the info that I gather together to the ECR for discussion. It could bring on some spirited discussion. It sounds like that I am in for the discussion. lol.

 

Al

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Carl,

 

I like your idea about the round table discussion. Maybe a late day discussion with some adult beverages could work out. I have been saving the info on pre-trip check lists. I also now have a copy of the Ohio CDL handbook. There is a pre-trip check list in the booklet. With the input from the group maybe we could have a list or too. I am also aware that there is a list in the resource guide. I will consult and look over this list also. I think right now I have 4 different sources that I will consult. It will be interesting what items come up the same from all of the lists. I will bring all the info that I gather together to the ECR for discussion. It could bring on some spirited discussion. It sounds like that I am in for the discussion. lol.

 

Al

Al,

 

Don't sell yourself short. Your question has obviously been of interest and would make a great ECR topic. We will communicate further as the ECR gets closer.

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Guest THE TRAILERKING

Yes that's a good one to watch over and over for anyone. If only all would go through it whether required or not as a part of your operators license. Can't go wrong.

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This is the first time I watched a video like this. It was very worth my time. I will be able to do a much more complete full inspection than I ever have done based on it before we leave here.

 

My thoughts are that in our application we should inspect items that are critical and can change status at anytime more frequently, such as before every trip. And then there will be a lot of items that are not as critical and/or are not likely to change status quickly (i.e. wear out) that can be done at greater intervals. It would be great to have someone with more knowledge on this to take a shot at sorting the inspection items into a few suggested interval designations for our same driver, low miles, RV application.

 

This may not be correct, but for example:

 

Every Trip - Brake Test (SALE), Oil and Coolant Levels, Tire Condition and Inflation, Signs of Leaks Under Vehicle....

Every Month or 3,000 miles - Slack Adjuster Play, Steering shaft play,

Once (or 2X?) a year - Full Inspection

 

Jim

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This is the first time I watched a video like this. It was very worth my time. I will be able to do a much more complete full inspection than I ever have done based on it before we leave here.

 

My thoughts are that in our application we should inspect items that are critical and can change status at anytime more frequently, such as before every trip. And then there will be a lot of items that are not as critical and/or are not likely to change status quickly (i.e. wear out) that can be done at greater intervals. It would be great to have someone with more knowledge on this to take a shot at sorting the inspection items into a few suggested interval designations for our same driver, low miles, RV application.

 

This may not be correct, but for example:

 

Every Trip - Brake Test (SALE), Oil and Coolant Levels, Tire Condition and Inflation, Signs of Leaks Under Vehicle....

Every Month or 3,000 miles - Slack Adjuster Play, Steering shaft play,

Once (or 2X?) a year - Full Inspection

 

Jim

 

Jim,

 

I like your example. I think that this can be all discussed at the next ECR. It should make for a good round table discussion. Carl asked me to take lead on gathering info for the discussion. Right now I have 5 different sources of info. I am going to see what is common in all of these sources.

 

Jim when you are at the national rally, and have some time maybe you could do some scouting on this subject. See what the feelings are on different check lists. A short conversation with a few people could work. Please not let it take away from your enjoyment of the rally. When we get together after the rally we could talk about this idea, if that is fine with you.

 

Have a safe trip and see you later,

Al

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This is the first time I watched a video like this. It was very worth my time. I will be able to do a much more complete full inspection than I ever have done based on it before we leave here.

 

My thoughts are that in our application we should inspect items that are critical and can change status at anytime more frequently, such as before every trip. And then there will be a lot of items that are not as critical and/or are not likely to change status quickly (i.e. wear out) that can be done at greater intervals. It would be great to have someone with more knowledge on this to take a shot at sorting the inspection items into a few suggested interval designations for our same driver, low miles, RV application.

 

This may not be correct, but for example:

 

Every Trip - Brake Test (SALE), Oil and Coolant Levels, Tire Condition and Inflation, Signs of Leaks Under Vehicle....

Every Month or 3,000 miles - Slack Adjuster Play, Steering shaft play,

Once (or 2X?) a year - Full Inspection

 

Jim

Now, Jim, that is borderline blasphemy. Go back and read the thread. Some here believe you should be "required" to do a complete pre trip every time you get in your truck. According to them, there is no difference in mileage or usage. Your HDT is the same as a commercial truck and according to them should be treated exactly the same. You are trying to interject logic and sound reasoning into the topic. Oh my god!!!! What will happen next?

 

As it was said in a wonderful movie:

Dr. Peter Venkman: This city (truck) is headed for a disaster of biblical proportions.

Mayor: What do you mean, "biblical"?

Dr Ray Stantz: What he means is Old Testament, Mr. Mayor, real wrath of God type stuff.

Dr. Peter Venkman: Exactly.

Dr Ray Stantz: Fire and brimstone coming down from the skies! Rivers and seas boiling!

Dr. Egon Spengler: Forty years of darkness! Earthquakes, volcanoes...

Winston Zeddemore: The dead rising from the grave!

Dr. Peter Venkman: Human sacrifice, dogs and cats living together... mass hysteria!

Mayor: All right, all right! I get the point!

 

SMV35-t-shirt-ghostbusters-femme-logo-so

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Now, Jim, that is borderline blasphemy. Go back and read the thread. Some here believe you should be "required" to do a complete pre trip every time you get in your truck. According to them, there is no difference in mileage or usage. Your HDT is the same as a commercial truck and according to them should be treated exactly the same. You are trying to interject logic and sound reasoning into the topic. Oh my god!!!! What will happen next?

 

As it was said in a wonderful movie:

Dr. Peter Venkman: This city (truck) is headed for a disaster of biblical proportions.

Mayor: What do you mean, "biblical"?

Dr Ray Stantz: What he means is Old Testament, Mr. Mayor, real wrath of God type stuff.

Dr. Peter Venkman: Exactly.

Dr Ray Stantz: Fire and brimstone coming down from the skies! Rivers and seas boiling!

Dr. Egon Spengler: Forty years of darkness! Earthquakes, volcanoes...

Winston Zeddemore: The dead rising from the grave!

Dr. Peter Venkman: Human sacrifice, dogs and cats living together... mass hysteria!

Mayor: All right, all right! I get the point!

 

SMV35-t-shirt-ghostbusters-femme-logo-so

 

 

Phil,

Your just too funny!!

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Guest THE TRAILERKING

http://www.dmvdriverslicense.com/Airbrakes-Written-Practice-Test.html

 

This is something that applies to anyone wanting to "Pilot" a "Big Rig" down the road not just a commercial driver.

If you really want to be picky.......It should be the "experienced trained professional driver" should be cut a lot more slack than the "occasional camper trailer puller".

Who do you think really has more experience with what's going on??

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I like this. Did the same for my CDL refresher. Railway tracks, gravel with hills. Etc. etc. stop on steep hills up. Stop on steep hills down. Deal with traffic that maybe can't stop. Correct use of triangles. Picking a safer place alto stop if you can.

 

A oncoming kid driving a half ton doing a ton and a half may not believe in sharing the road equitably with you. What is your strategy to avoid a collision. What is your normal strategy for positioning on a greasy back gravel road?

 

What about including the driving component? Finding a local route used by the local driving people and running some of the newer members just getting into the HDT scene through it a few times. It will take more than once. I was run through it probably a dozen times before I nailed it.

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I've retired Roger. I don't give a damn the link doesn't work at 4am. Lol

 

I think it came back later.

 

If there is a golden rule. It's avoid dump trucks.

 

Geo, wake up, its 4 am. The link doesn't work.

TK, another good list. A couple of explanations.

- minimum 5 seconds b/w HDT and any vehicle in front, more if weather is poor. If someone cuts in front , back off. You can tell if an RV or MH or Commercial driver knows the rules by timing them in your rear view mirror going past a point you just went by.

 

- when going around a rt hand curve, drivers front left wheel should be close to the left or outside of the lane, the Commercial trailer wheels will be closer to the rt side of the lane due to "off track." In my case this is not completely true. The truck pivot point is behind the rear wheel. The trailer pivot point is in the middle of the center of the three trailer wheels. It takes 1.25 lanes to round a 90 degree turn as a Commercial rig takes 2. That is with the Commercial trailers wheels right at the rear and not slid in.

- The reference to speed in a curve is correct. There is a particular corner we went around where if you enter it at the correct speed and are placed correctly in the lane, you have a steady increase of power all thru the turn. By the time you exit the turn, you are just about at hiway speed. By the time you are past the solid line on your left in this case and beside the broken line, you are at hiwy speed and can shift lanes at speed. You can't cross a solid line when merging, only dotted.

 

- this checklist has the tug test, I noted.

- 4 ways can be checked in the cab as the interior indicators are on the same circuit as the exterior lites...so I was told.

- they allow 20 minutes so this must be a condensed version, I'd have to do it to find out.

- backing up for me is easier than backing up a commercial trailer with a conventional tractor as the pivot points are different. I can wag the tail of my trailer by hard left to hard right and little rearward movement.

- When making a 90 degree turn you can cut into an opposing lane if there is no opposing traffic. If opposing traffic has to stop or back up, you fail, back to the barn.

- When turning a 90 degree turn you have to cut off your inside lane with your trailer then just before the corner, straddle the 2 lanes blocking both. When you go, go out to the pile of gravel in the middle of the intersection then turn. Making sure the trailer wheels don't jump the curb or you smoke a cyclist, pole or mailbox or its back to the barn again.

 

The pretrip is one thing but knowing how to drive correctly is another. The exam has 2 parts, both need to be passed. The pretrip needs practice over and over as does the driving route the examiner takes. The route doesn't vary except for construction work enroute. They only allow 2 hrs, in my case, to do the whole exam. 15 minutes prior to pretrip for paperwork, 45 minutes for pretrip and 1 hr for the driving part. = 2 hrs.

 

To the best of my knowledge there are only 4 or 5 HDT's in BC, now 1 fewer with Geo's gone.

 

 

In BC we are allowed 60 demerit points b4 failing..Most get 40 - 45.

 

Re doing a presentation, funny guy.

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Jim's complete list was:

 

Every Trip - Brake Test (SALE), Oil and Coolant Levels, Tire Condition and Inflation, Signs of Leaks Under Vehicle...
Every Month or 3,000 miles - Slack Adjuster Play, Steering shaft play
Once (or 2X?) a year - Full Inspection

 

I complimented him on bringing logic and sound reasoning into the topic. NOWHERE will you find that I have ever said that checking ones brakes is a bad thing.



What about including the driving component? Finding a local route used by the local driving people and running some of the newer members just getting into the HDT scene through it a few times. It will take more than once. I was run through it probably a dozen times before I nailed it.

 

Won't their lawyer have a field day with that one.

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