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Pre Trip Check List


alan0043

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Hi Everyone,

 

I see there is a couple of threads about a pre-trip check list. That got me thinking. Being a rookie, I don't have a check list. Does anyone have their list written down on paper ? What kind of things need to be on a pre-trip check list ? It would be nice to see what other people are using on their check list. For the people that have a pre-trip check list can you share your list with us ? I know it will help me. After you have your list down on paper you could have it laminated and use a grease pencil to make check marks on your list. After the list is complete you can wipe off the grease pencil and have a new sheet ready for the next trip.

 

Please share your list with us,

Al

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Guest THE TRAILERKING

You should be required to do the pre-trip inspection on your Volvo before piloting that thing down the road.....................Just like anyone that would have a CDL. It shouldn't matter if it's pulling commercial trailers or an RV. It's still the same truck with "air brakes".

I'm talking for the required pre-trip on the large air brake equipped truck. Not a pre-trip on your RV to make sure the stinky-slinky is tucked away.

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Alan, I'm not sure if all the required info is on the checklists you find but you need to know what you are looking for, how and why.

I took my CDL and the Pretrip was a major part of the overall evaluation.

 

Have a look at the lists recommended, if there are questions contact me here or pm or I can provide my regular e-mail and can explain in detail with pics if needed an explanation of the item in question.

 

Re the trailer Pretrip, there are similarities and differences from a commercial trailer with air brakes but it is possible to put Commercial trailer speak into 5th wheel rv speak.

 

Let me know. You do need to be safe out there. Repercussions from an accident caused by mechanical failure due to negligence are frightening.

 

Roger

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You should be required to do the pre-trip inspection on your Volvo before piloting that thing down the road.....................Just like anyone that would have a CDL. It shouldn't matter if it's pulling commercial trailers or an RV. It's still the same truck with "air brakes".

I'm talking for the required pre-trip on the large air brake equipped truck. Not a pre-trip on your RV to make sure the stinky-slinky is tucked away.

The day that I start putting the same mileage on my RV as a commercial driver puts on his then I will agree to your "requirement". Is it the air brake thing that you think requires a pre-trip? Who do you propose will enforce this "requirement? Where will your "requirement" stop? Should the guy in the U-Haul moving across country be"required" to do the same pre trip inspection? How about the college student in California with the "commercial" one ton truck his dad sent him to school with? Why not require everyone to do a pretrip on their vehicles before they leave for work every morning? There is a reason that (most) states do not require a CDL to drive an HDT RV and there are enough "requirements" in this world without trying to lump RV'ers into a category in which they do not fit.

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Guest THE TRAILERKING

The day that I start putting the same mileage on my RV as a commercial driver puts on his then I will agree to your "requirement". Is it the air brake thing that you think requires a pre-trip? Who do you propose will enforce this "requirement? Where will your "requirement" stop? Should the guy in the U-Haul moving across country be"required" to do the same pre trip inspection? How about the college student in California with the "commercial" one ton truck his dad sent him to school with? Why not require everyone to do a pretrip on their vehicles before they leave for work every morning? There is a reason that (most) states do not require a CDL to drive an HDT RV and there are enough "requirements" in this world without trying to lump RV'ers into a category in which they do not fit.

Sorry you feel that way........................But it's got nothing to do with how many miles you put on, RV compared to Commercial. Yes there is a lot of difference between a large air brake truck than a U-Haul or a one ton. Quite a lot of people out there shouldn't be piloting any air brake equipped vehicle. They jump out of a mini van and into an air brake vehicle and require.....No training, No certification, No knowledge. Why should that be? It's all fine 'till mow some innocent bystander down.

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It's the same complex piece of equipment a commercial driver herds down the road.

 

I have personally found about as many issues from lack of use as from heavy use. Different areas, but lots of issues.

 

We have very lengthy recommended service intervals on these units. I usually only have to do s significant service once per year. This quite rightly puts the onus on the operator to keep more than half an eye on the state of maintenance.

 

OTOH, an 85 year old that shouldn't even be allowed to drive a car gets a free pass to drive his 50K+ lb Newell down the highway on his car license.

 

Just cause you can do it doesn't make it right.

 

We get away with a lot; we mostly fly under the radar and don't cause a fuss. Let's keep it that way. Check the rig frequently and at least reasonably thoroughly.

 

Geo

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It's the same complex piece of equipment a commercial driver herds down the road.

 

I have personally found about as many issues from lack of use as from heavy use. Different areas, but lots of issues.

 

We have very lengthy recommended service intervals on these units. I usually only have to do s significant service once per year. This quite rightly puts the onus on the operator to keep more than half an eye on the state of maintenance.

 

OTOH, an 85 year old that shouldn't even be allowed to drive a car gets a free pass to drive his 50K+ lb Newell down the highway on his car license.

 

Just cause you can do it doesn't make it right.

 

We get away with a lot; we mostly fly under the radar and don't cause a fuss. Let's keep it that way. Check the rig frequently and at least reasonably thoroughly.

 

Geo

Totally and completely agree

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The Rand McNally truckers atlas, about $12 at any truckstop has an excellent full page illustrated diagram of a DOT pre trip inspection. Easy to follow.

 

Hi Jeff. Thanks for the suggestion. There is a Flying J about 3 miles from the house. I'll make a little road trip and see if they have an atlas.

 

Hi Roger. Thank you for your offer of help. I'll see what I come up with. Then if I have more questions I will p/m you a note.

 

I will take a look at the resource guide and see what I can find. I want to be as safe as possible on the road.

 

I was hoping to see what kind of check list that other people use.

 

Al

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I do a pretrip because I don't want to break down on the road. While I could say I do it for "safety" reasons, I don't. I do it for MY CONVENIENCE. I don't like being on the roadside.

 

One thing everyone should do before every trip in the truck is an airbrake performance check. You do want to know your brakes are performing properly.

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I do a pretrip because I don't want to break down on the road. While I could say I do it for "safety" reasons, I don't. I do it for MY CONVENIENCE. I don't like being on the roadside.

 

One thing everyone should do before every trip in the truck is an airbrake conformance check. You do want to know your brakes are performing properly.

 

Jack,

 

How does someone do the airbrake conformance check ? Or is it better to go to You Tube and find something on air brakes ?

 

Al

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Alan,

I was unable to find the RM checklist on line but did find a different one. Let me give you a couple of examples of why an explanation may be required for some. This is base on an assumption you bought an HDT and drove it home and you do not have a CDL...you may have an air endorsement.

 

Checklist mentioned "Tires"...OK, so what about tires? What are you supposed to do? Do you know?? Here is what I was taught. Start with the rear set of duals.

 

. Check the inside of the inside dual for rips tears or bulges, all around if possible.

. Check the tread of inside tire to see if tread is even and adequate. Even meaning no bald spots or uneven wear pattern possibly indicating misalignment

. No objects, ie.rocks, in between duals. In the Vancouver BC area 20 - 30 yrs ago, a driver in a car was killed by a rock flung out of a set of duals on a truck he was following. Took half his head off.

. Check for rips tears or bulges on the faces of the tires facing each other. Where an object could be jammed.

. Check for even and adequate tread on outside dual, no big chunks out, tread not down to the casing. I saw a Bison Transport truck towed into Kal tire just outside Victoria last Summer. The Commercial Inspection people took him off the road. It was a fleet truck, not his and he was indeed down to the casing, I looked and not just in one place. This tells me all the drivers for Bison who drove that particular truck dropped the ball and so did the firm itself. That tire issue should have been written up on the truck inspection report handed into the firm.

. Check outside of outside dual for rips tears or bulges. In my case with a Herrin truck body, seeing all of the area b/w or inside a tire is not that easy. But if you check the tires b4 each trip, you would eventually catch the bulge. I hope you understand.

. I'm including the rims and hubs on my own list, so carrying on....

. Check the rim for damage and cracks

. Check all lugnuts are tight and all there...use gloves and twist each one by hand to check to see if loose. Check the hub for leaks, no fluid running out. Probably would show up by oil spun all around the inside o f the rim when truck underway.

. Check to see if duals are inflated, I use an old 2lb ball pien hammer to thump both. I've not found a fla t on my vehicle but I'm guessing on would sound different from an inflated tire. Check both duals as one s upport the other and one being flat may not be evident. This is different from the front tire as it is by itself and if it was flat, it would be obvious.

. Check valve stems for "no audible leaks"

 

Get the idea???

 

Don't worry about Big Fiver, he is dead wrong.

 

There are a couple of road atlases in the locker somewhere, I"ll take a look today and have a look for the checklist that's been referred to.

 

I haven't even touched suspension, drivetrain and what to look for in the engine compartment, oil and fluid leaks and levels, shocks, filters, fan belt and fan blades, hoses........

 

Does this checklist even mention a tug test??? Best do that with the landing gear down or you will get a nasty surprise.

 

Also each time you make a pit stop, say every couple of hrs, do a walkaround, lights, tires, new damage, load secure. There is at least one other member here who does.

 

RE an RV trailer, sat dish or antenae down?? The installer of a Sat dish at the Motorhome place in Junction City drove into the shop and ripped the thing off the roof, I was there after it happened.

 

When you learn to fly, you most certainly have a checklist. It is said that Charles Lindburgh lived as long as he did because he took 20 minutes to do his walkaround or pretrip.

 

Re air brakes, I can send you the link to the site put up by my instructor. I'll take another look at that element. If it or any part of it is unclear let me know.

 

If the "book" is clear, fine, move on.

 

Watch the view count on this topic. There may be others lurking who are in the same boat.

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Roger,

"Does this checklist even mention a tug test??? Best do that with the landing gear down or you will get a nasty surprise."

 

You really want that front landing gear to be about 1 inch off the ground once your truck and hitch are aired up before you do the tug test. If your landing gear is all the way down, and your hitch is in fact locked, you won't like that surprise either. (mainly for newbies).

 

Just wanted to clarify "landing gear down".

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Guest THE TRAILERKING

Lmao. Tell the judge and jury that you followed you tube for your inspection.

My point exactly.

I don't understand how people figure it's no big deal. "If I can buy the truck.....I can drive it".

If you want to operate something of that caliber then get trained, tested, and certified. What's the problem?

If feel can't pass the test then you shouldn't operate the vehicle. This also applies to the person that hops in a 40' DP motorhome with or without air brakes. Get training and qualified. Then there'll be a less chance of an incedent/fatality.

Go down to your local testing/licensing branch and obtain an "Air Brake Manual". Study it as if you're going for a CDL.......Then you'll stand half a chance of knowing what you're doing, SAFELY and CORRECTLY.

It's that simple.

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Don't worry about Big Fiver, he is dead wrong.

Roger, you really should learn to read. I never said a pretrip shouldn't be done. I said there should be no "requirement" for a pretrip inspection. There is a big difference. Of course you should check your vehicle, but who do you propose enforce your "required" pretrip inspection? Do you think that all HDT rv's should be subject to random roadside inspections, like commercial vehicles? So along with a "required" pretrip then why not "require" cdl's, log books, and medical certificates? Along with those "requirements" we would need extra insurance and DOT numbers, right?

No! How about taking responsibility for yourself and your RV? Do your own pretrip without some moron in some position of authority "requiring" what we do before we drive down the road? If YOU need someone to "require" you to do a pretrip, call your mother, father or wife but I am fully capable of checking my own truck without anyone enforcing a "requirement" on me.

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Do you think that all HDT rv's should be subject to random roadside inspections, like commercial vehicles?

They already are, at least they are here. An it happens lots, particularly holiday weekends. And your cdl is just as much at risk if they don't like what they find.

 

Geo

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Roger,

"Does this checklist even mention a tug test??? Best do that with the landing gear down or you will get a nasty surprise."

 

You really want that front landing gear to be about 1 inch off the ground once your truck and hitch are aired up before you do the tug test. If your landing gear is all the way down, and your hitch is in fact locked, you won't like that surprise either. (mainly for newbies).

 

Just wanted to clarify "landing gear down".

Ya 1inch off the ground is not a bad idea.

And even the most experienced drivers screw up sometimes :)19E3BB6D-AB60-429A-8356-E17C22A47F94_zps

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Guest THE TRAILERKING

Try this..

Preparing Your CDL Pre Trip Inspection Checklist

Every commercial license applicant must pass a CDL driving test, and, every CDL driving test, regardless of state or CDL class, consists of at least three initial parts: the pre trip inspection, the driving skills exam, and road test.

During the inspection, each CDL driver applicant will be required to identify specific parts and components and explain why he or she is inspecting them to the examiner.

The inspection is extensive; we’ve provided a sample inspection checklist for you below:

Engine Compartment (Engine Off)

Leaks and Hoses:

  • Look for puddles on the ground.
  • Look for dripping fluids on the underside of the engine and transmission.
  • Check hoses for leaks.

Oil Level:

  • Point out where dipstick is located.
  • Make sure oil level is adequate.

Coolant Level:

  • Check the coolant level.

Power Steering Fluid:

  • Indicate where dipstick is located.
  • Check the power steering fluid level.

Engine Compartment Belts:

  • Check the power steering, water pump, alternator, and air compressor belts for snugness, cracks, or fraying.
Cab Check (Engine On)

Clutch/Gearshift:

  • Depress the clutch.
  • Place the gearshift lever in neutral.
  • Start engine and release clutch slowly.

Oil Pressure Gauge:

  • Make sure the gauge is functioning.
  • Check that the pressure gauge shows increasing or normal oil pressure, or that the warning light goes off.

Temperature Gauge:

  • Check that the gauge is working properly.
  • The temperature should gradually climb to a normal operating range, or the temperature light should be off.

Ammeter/Voltmeter:

  • Make sure the gauges show the alternator and/or generator is charging or that the warning light is off.

Air/Vacuum Gauge:

  • Make sure the gauge is functioning properly.

Mirrors and Windshield:

  • Mirrors should be clean and adjusted properly.
  • Windshield should be free of cracks and unnecessary decals.

Emergency Equipment:

  • Check for spare electrical fuses.
  • Check for three emergency triangles.
  • Check fire extinguisher.

Steering Play:

  • Non-power steering: check for excessive play.
  • Power steering: check for excessive play with the engine running.

Wipers/Washers:

  • Check that the wiper arms and blades are secure and free of damage.
  • If equipped, windshield wipers must operate properly.

Lighting Indicators:

  • Make sure the turn signals, four-way emergency flashers and high beam indicator lights work on the dashboard.

Horn:

  • Check that horn works properly.

Lights/Reflectors:

  • Make sure headlights, directional lights, taillights, clearance, four-way flashers, brake lights, and red and amber reflectors are all clean and functioning.
Brake Check

Parking Brake Check:

  • Apply parking brake and make sure it holds by shifting into lower gear and slowly pulling against it.

Hydraulic Brake Check:

  • With engine running, apply pressure to brake pedal and hold for five seconds, making sure the brake pedal does not move.
  • Make sure the warning buzzer and/or light is off.
  • Check the brake operation by moving slowly forward and hitting the brake, paying attention to any pulling or delay.

Air Brake Check:

  • Test air leakage rate.
  • Test air brake system for leaks.
  • Check that spring brakes come on automatically.
  • Check rate of air pressure buildup.
  • Check service brakes.
External Components

Steering Box/Hoses:

  • Check that the steering box is mounted and secure.
  • Look for steering fluid leaks.

Steering Linkage:

  • Check that the connecting links, arms and rods from the steering box to the wheel are not worn or cracked.
  • Make sure the joints and sockets are not worn or loose.
Suspension

Springs/Air/Torque:

  • Look for broken or cracked leaf springs.
  • Look for broken or bent coil springs.
  • Check air ride suspension for damage and leaks.

Mounts:

  • Check for cracked or broken spring hangers, missing or damaged bushings, and broken or missing axle mounting parts.

Shock Absorbers:

  • Check that shocks are secure and without leaks.
Brakes

Slack Adjusters:

  • Check for broken or missing parts.
  • When pulled by hand, the brake rod should not move more than an inch.

Brake Chambers:

  • Brake chambers should not be leaking, cracked, or dented.

Brake Hoses:

  • Check for cracked, leaking, or worn hoses.

Drum Brake or Rotor:

  • Check for cracks, dents, or holes.
  • Brake linings or pads (where visible) should not be worn or excessively thin.
Wheels

Rims:

  • Look for damaged or bent rims.

Tires:

  • Check for tread depth.
  • Look for cuts or damage to tread or sidewalls.
  • Make sure stems are not missing, broken or damaged.
  • Check for proper inflation.

Hub Oil Seals/Axle Seals:

  • Make sure grease and axle seals aren't leaking.

Lug Nuts:

  • Make sure all lug nuts are accounted for, free of cracks, and securely fastened.
Side of Vehicle

Door(s) and Mirror(s):

  • Check that doors are not damaged and can be opened properly.
  • Make sure mirror and mirror brackets are secure.

Fuel Tank:

  • Check that tanks are secure, caps are tight, and there are no visible leaks.

Battery/Box:

  • Check that the battery is secure and connections are tight.
  • Make sure the battery is free of corrosion.
  • Check that battery box and cover or door is secure.

Drive Shaft:

  • Check that the drive shaft is not bent or cracked.
  • Make sure the couplings are secure and free of foreign objects.

Exhaust System:

  • Check system for damage and signs of leaks.
  • Check that the system is connected and mounted properly.

Frame:

  • Check for cracks, broken welds, holes, or other damage to the longitudinal frame members, cross members, box, and floor.
Rear of Vehicle

Splash Guard:

  • If equipped, make sure splash guards are not damaged and mounted properly.

Doors/Ties/Lifts:

  • Make sure the doors and hinges are not damaged and all work properly.
  • Ties, straps and binders must all be secure.
  • If equipped with a cargo lift, check for leaking and damaged parts.
Tractor/Coupling

Air/Electric Lines:

  • Listen for air leaks.
  • Make sure air and electrical lines are not tangled, pinched, or dragging against tractor parts.

Catwalk:

  • Check that the catwalk is solid, free of objects, and securely bolted to tractor frame.

Mounting Bolts:

  • Check for loose or missing mounting brackets, clamps, bolts, or nuts.
  • Both the fifth wheel and slide mounting must be solidly attached.

Locking Jaws:

  • Look into fifth wheel gap and check that locking jaws are fully closed around the kingpin.

Platform (Fifth Wheel):

  • Check for brakes or cracks in the platform structure which supports the fifth wheel skid plate.

Kingpin/Apron/Gap:

  • Make sure the kingpin is not bent.
  • Make sure the visible part of the apron is not bent, cracked, or broken.
  • Check that the trailer is laying flat on the fifth wheel skid plate.

Locking Pins (Fifth Wheel):

  • If equipped, look for loose or missing pins in the slide mechanism of the fifth wheel.
  • Make sure locking pins are fully engaged.
  • Check that the fifth wheel is positioned properly so the tractor frame will clear the landing gear and the tractor will not strike the trailer during turns.
Additional Ways to Prepare for the CDL Test

To help prepare for the inspection, study your state's CDL manual. You might think you only need this kind of CDL practice for the written knowledge exam, but the truth is the manual generally contains detailed inspection information and more studying you do, the more prepared you’ll be for each part of the CDL test.

You should also do yourself a favor and take at least one CDL practice test. You can find these online and they’ll test you on your pre trip inspection knowledge.

When you think you're ready, call your local DMV and make a CDL test appointment.

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Geo, where is here

Ontario is where I've seen this the most. Out of service literally by the thousand. Motorbikes, cars, pickups, u-hauls, trucks. OPP working with MOT. May 24, Canada Day, Aug civic holiday and Labor Day weekends.

 

I've been stopped once in BC. Didn't like non-commercial plates on the bobtail Volvo.

 

Geo

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