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Trick the AC system?


MoonTimber

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As I posted a few weeks ago, we just bought a 1991 Jamboree Rallye 27' motorhome for $4500. I basically paid for it with my tax refund. Last night my mechanic did a very thorough inspection.

 

Overall the motorhome is in good shape. My mechanic said that mechanically the RV seemed to be in good shape. On his list of failures, the alternator needs to be replaced soon, the front tires need immediate replacement, and the wiring to several running lights were broken - which needs to be fixed so I don't get a ticket. We're talking about $300 to $500 in repairs to get it roadworthy, which I can handle.

 

Unfortunately, the chassis A/C is not working. I didn't notice because it was cold out when I bought it. My mechanic can't diagnose it because he doesn't have equipment to test R12, he can only do R134.

 

My experience with AC has been that even when they give you a quote to repair it for $100, it might end up costing $1500 because as they replace one part they find other failed parts. Being that this thing is R12, I would have to pay a minimum of $240 to convert it to R134. That uncertainty makes me wonder if we should just sell this RV and find another one.

 

I knew someone years ago who could run his coach AC while driving. I'd almost rather buy a newer coach AC than repair the chassis AC, because of all the uncertainty in the cost of repairing chassis AC. So my first question:

 

Is there is a way to run my 110V coach AC via the inverter without frying all my electronics?

 

Second, does anyone make a 12V/110V coach AC that is under $600?

 

Third, am I crazy for wanting to cross the country with my family in a 24 year old RV?

 

Fourth, should I just sell it and look for a travel trailer?

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If the RV has a working generator you can run that to operate the AC on the roof. It is most likely already set up to do it. Obviously you will use more gas/deisel/propane whichever your ginny runs on and of course it will require more service. It still might be a better deal than repairing the chassis air. I had to have a compressor replaced on a 2002 Chev pu with 134 about 2 years ago and it ran about $1000. or so at the Chev. dealer. I went with the dealer that was slightly higher but a much better warranty. In your case you would probably need new hoses at the least plus converting to the 134 would be the way to go if you risk it. Remember the evaportator and condensor are also as old on this ac system. With the money you have tied up in this thing and you were able to use the ginny and house rv it could still be a pretty reasonable trip if all the other systems are good and safe. It will ultimatly be a judgment call on your part.

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If you are in the Las Vegas area I can check your dash AC for you....I brought a set of guages with me and they do fit on an R-12 system.

If you are too far away ..you can call around to your local hvac companies. There will be someone who can still work on R-12 systems. Heck I still have about 6 sets of guages back home that still fit R-12 systems. If all you need is a fill you can still get that done using stuff you buy in Walmart or Pepboys, etc, etc. if the problem is worse than just a fill then all bets are off but In my opinion its worth a try.

 

I have checked systems in the past where the customer assumed the system was out of refgt to find that it was simply a power issue and nothing wrong with the refgt side of things.

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Run the generator and the roof air.

 

Second thing, is you do not have to convert to R-134A. You can use one of the drop-in alternate replacements such as "Hot-shot" (trade name) which is a blend that is compatible with the existing o-rings, hoses and oil. You will still need to properly find and repair the leak.

 

Buying a slightly newer unit will not insure that you will not have repairs on it as well.

 

Ken

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It would take HUGEEEEEEE Inverter and plenty of battery capacity and a high rated alternator to ever think about running a roof AC while driving THATS OUT IN MY OPINION very impractical and expensive.

 

Its much more do-able, reasonable, and standard to run the genset to power the roof AC while driving. That may require something like 3 to 4 quarts per hour of extra gasoline subject to genny size and load and temperature etc.

 

I have been in that cab AC situation before and in my opinion its best in the long run to bite the bullet, spend maybe $1,000 (mine cost $700 locally) to convert to R 134 and be done with it for years of good service. I would NOT try a conversion kit trying to save money because for one thing theres a good chance its your compressor that's bad and leaking. When I converted I bought a new compressor, new filter/dryer, orfice tube if so equipped, and the system was then evacuated, and charged with oil and Freon and all was fine as long as I owned them.

 

"Third, am I crazy for wanting to cross the country with my family in a 24 year old RV?"

 

ABSOLUTELY NOT

 

However, I would want new tires, properly inflated,,,,,,,,,,,,,all new belts and hoses,,,,,,,,,,all fluids flushed and filled including brake fluid system,,,,,,,,,radiator flushed cleaned and serviced, good t stat,,,,,,,,,,front wheel bearings inspected repacked and pads and rotor turns as necessary,,,,,,,,,,,,,,inspect for brake wheel cylinder leaks and rear axle seals,,,,,,,,,,,good general tune up (plugs, wires, cap rotor etc). Of course all RV systems working (water, fridge, fans, furnace, water heater etc)

 

SURE all this is gonna cost, but the alternative of a breakdown on the road is even more expensive and can ruin a vacation DO IT NOW NOTTTTTTTTTT HALF WAY UP A MOUNTAIN and be towed in and ripped off grrrrrrrrrrrrrr

 

I crossed the country many times with the wife n 3 kids on board in an RV, it can be great PROVIDED NO BREAK DOWNS SO FIX IT NOW NOT ON YOUR VACATION

 

John T

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It would take HUGEEEEEEE Inverter and plenty of battery capacity and a high rated alternator to ever think about running a roof AC while driving THATS OUT IN MY OPINION very impractical and expensive.

 

Its much more do-able, reasonable, and standard to run the genset to power the roof AC while driving. That may require something like 3 to 4 quarts per hour of extra gasoline subject to genny size and load and temperature etc.

 

I have been in that cab AC situation before and in my opinion its best in the long run to bite the bullet, spend maybe $1,000 (mine cost $700 locally) to convert to R 134 and be done with it for years of good service. I would NOT try a conversion kit trying to save money because for one thing theres a good chance its your compressor that's bad and leaking. When I converted I bought a new compressor, new filter/dryer, orfice tube if so equipped, and the system was then evacuated, and charged with oil and Freon and all was fine as long as I owned them.

 

"Third, am I crazy for wanting to cross the country with my family in a 24 year old RV?"

 

ABSOLUTELY NOT

 

However, I would want new tires, properly inflated,,,,,,,,,,,,,all new belts and hoses,,,,,,,,,,all fluids flushed and filled including brake fluid system,,,,,,,,,radiator flushed cleaned and serviced, good t stat,,,,,,,,,,front wheel bearings inspected repacked and pads and rotor turns as necessary,,,,,,,,,,,,,,inspect for brake wheel cylinder leaks and rear axle seals,,,,,,,,,,,good general tune up (plugs, wires, cap rotor etc). Of course all RV systems working (water, fridge, fans, furnace, water heater etc)

 

SURE all this is gonna cost, but the alternative of a breakdown on the road is even more expensive and can ruin a vacation DO IT NOW NOTTTTTTTTTT HALF WAY UP A MOUNTAIN and be towed in and ripped off grrrrrrrrrrrrrr

 

I crossed the country many times with the wife n 3 kids on board in an RV, it can be great PROVIDED NO BREAK DOWNS SO FIX IT NOW NOT ON YOUR VACATION

 

John T

 

Everything you've said makes sense. And I'm glad folks think it's not crazy to do a long trip in an old RV, because we certainly can't afford a much newer one yet. But we're putting a fleece out. We decided to post it for sale. If someone buys it, we'll go look for one with working A/C. If no one buys it in the next two weeks, I'll go ahead and sink the money into fixing the chassis A/C. We're in two minds about it because we like this old beater, but it needs just enough other repairs that after talking it over for two hours we think we could end up spending all our travel money on repairs. It needs new tires up front, it needs new wiring for all the running lights, the alternator is starting to fail, the transmission pan leaks, the interior is nice but needs a few hundred in curtains and wallpaper and hinges and bits glued back in place. Overall it runs good and looks good but when you add it all up the A/C repair might put us over what we can afford. I think we would rather like to spend a tiny bit more up front to start with something that needs just a tiny bit less work.

 

We could change our minds. My seven year old son was really upset when we told him.

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With the help of a "You-Pull-It" yard, the alternator could be replaced for around $25. Same goes for the tires, I've bought replacement tires already mounted on rims and holding air. There's no better place to learn the basics of auto repair, or hang out when you're 7 years old. While the belts are pulled for the alternator, replace the compressor yourself. A couple other small parts and all the A/C system is new. Take it to a shop to evacuate and recharge, and enjoy the savings. Do you need new curtains, or want them? Defer the cost for now.

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It depends on how much if any of the repairs you could do yourself!!!!! NO WAY Id take my family out on the road at 60 MPH with aged weather cracked or dried out tires or even questionable used ones BUT YOURE LOOKIN AT $600 TO over $1000 FOR 6 NEW TIRES (subject to size and brand etc) YIKESSSSSSSSSSSS

 

High dollar for a shop to install a new R 134 AC Compressor and Filter Dryer could be well over $1,000 or perhaps cheaper or if you did it yourself I THINK ID JUST RUN THE GENNY AND ROOF AC the first time out. That cost is only like 3/4 qts of gas per hour when running genset

 

Alternator may be $50 used or over $100 rebuilt PLUS Labor??????

 

New belts and hoses and radiator flush could be $100 to $200 (depends on cost and labor)

 

Brakes and wheel bearings packed and check wheel cylinders etc??? Maybe a hundred to several depending on condition

 

EVEN THOUGH ITS YOUR MONEY INSTEAD OF MINE IM STARTING TO BACK OUT ALSO LOL but no way Id start out until most of the above is taken care of or at least inspected

 

STILL FAMILY RV VACATIONS WERE THE GREATEST THINGS WE EVER DID TO BOND WITH OUR KIDS SO IF AT ALL POSSIBLE GO FOR IT!!!!!!!!!!

 

I used to buy and repair and use then re sell RV's, you need to buy one from somebody like me who took good care of them

 

John T

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With the help of a "You-Pull-It" yard, the alternator could be replaced for around $25. Same goes for the tires, I've bought replacement tires already mounted on rims and holding air. There's no better place to learn the basics of auto repair, or hang out when you're 7 years old. While the belts are pulled for the alternator, replace the compressor yourself. A couple other small parts and all the A/C system is new. Take it to a shop to evacuate and recharge, and enjoy the savings. Do you need new curtains, or want them? Defer the cost for now.

 

I used to do it all myself. I'm pretty sure I can get a rebuilt alternator off eBay for $70, and a new compressor for $60. I converted an old Jeep to R134 about eight years ago. I had to replace the compressor, the dryer, and the nipples. I remember it wasn't too expensive or too challenging though it was still around $400 in parts and chemicals and took me two full days. The thing is, now that I have two young children, I find it really challenging to muster up the energy to do automotive projects. I'll do it if I absolutely have to, but if I can choose to avoid it I will.

 

The A/C could turn into a nightmare if there is more than one leak. I tried repairing the A/C in one of my cars once. First it was a leaky condenser. I replaced it and the dryer and filled the system again, only to find out there was a leak in the hose to the compressor. I replaced that hose (and the dryer again) and found there was a leak in the coil thingy in my dashboard. I had to pay someone to replace that piece. That's the scenario I'm afraid of with this RV. It might be a really easy fix, and it could turn into a several week fiasco where I have to keep buying R134 and end up replacing the dryer two or three times.

 

If no one shows up to buy it I think I will go your route. The alternator is too easy of a job to pay someone, and it might just be worth fixing before I sell it.

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It depends on how much if any of the repairs you could do yourself!!!!! NO WAY Id take my family out on the road at 60 MPH with aged weather cracked or dried out tires or even questionable used ones BUT YOURE LOOKIN AT $600 TO over $1000 FOR 6 NEW TIRES (subject to size and brand etc) YIKESSSSSSSSSSSS

 

High dollar for a shop to install a new R 134 AC Compressor and Filter Dryer could be well over $1,000 or perhaps cheaper or if you did it yourself I THINK ID JUST RUN THE GENNY AND ROOF AC the first time out. That cost is only like 3/4 qts of gas per hour when running genset

 

Alternator may be $50 used or over $100 rebuilt PLUS Labor??????

 

New belts and hoses and radiator flush could be $100 to $200 (depends on cost and labor)

 

Brakes and wheel bearings packed and check wheel cylinders etc??? Maybe a hundred to several depending on condition

 

EVEN THOUGH ITS YOUR MONEY INSTEAD OF MINE IM STARTING TO BACK OUT ALSO LOL but no way Id start out until most of the above is taken care of or at least inspected

 

STILL FAMILY RV VACATIONS WERE THE GREATEST THINGS WE EVER DID TO BOND WITH OUR KIDS SO IF AT ALL POSSIBLE GO FOR IT!!!!!!!!!!

 

I used to buy and repair and use then re sell RV's, you need to buy one from somebody like me who took good care of them

 

John T

 

I tried running the coach AC with the generator on, and it's not connected. So that means I connect my new inverter to the battery, then run a power cord from the inverter to the coach shore port connector, which will provide power to the whole coach, right?

 

You said: "EVEN THOUGH ITS YOUR MONEY INSTEAD OF MINE IM STARTING TO BACK OUT ALSO LOL"

And I had to laugh out loud myself!

 

You said: "STILL FAMILY RV VACATIONS WERE THE GREATEST THINGS WE EVER DID TO BOND WITH OUR KIDS SO IF AT ALL POSSIBLE GO FOR IT!!!!!!!!!!"

One way or another I plan to make it happen! It just seems like it would be really great for my kids to see different parts of the country and go places that don't have the word "mall" in the name.

 

You said: "I used to buy and repair and use then re sell RV's, you need to buy one from somebody like me who took good care of them"

Got one for sale? :)

 

PS, right now it looks like I only need to replace the two front tires. The rear tires look newer and don't have cracks.

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PS, right now it looks like I only need to replace the two front tires. The rear tires look newer and don't have cracks.

 

You should be checking the date of manufacture on those tires .

 

Here's how :

 

http://rvbasics.com/techtips/RV-tire-age-how-old.html

 

 

 

I tried running the coach AC with the generator on, and it's not connected.

 

It works on shore power only ?

What size is your generator ?

​Seems pretty strange to have an AC that the on-board gen-set couldn't run .

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QUESTION

 

"I tried running the coach AC with the generator on, and it's not connected. So that means I connect my new inverter to the battery, then run a power cord from the inverter to the coach shore port connector, which will provide power to the whole coach, right?"

 

ANSWER

 

WRONG If the genset is rated at sufficient KW, perhaps 2.5 KW MInimum, but preferably 3.5KW to 4KW or more,,,,, YOU DO NOTTTTTTTTT USE ANY 12 VDC to 120 VAC INVERTER to power the AC via 12 volt batteries (I doubt you even have one unless someone added it, sounds like you did BUTTTTTTTTTTTTT even so it would take a huge inverter to run a roof top AC, no 400 or 1000 watt unit will cut it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!), the 120 VAC genset powers the AC and other onboard 120 VAC appliances the same way as if you were plugged up at a campground to 120 VAC power. IE if you have a big enough genset that powers the AC NOTTTTTTT an Inverter usually, although sure it can be done..........

 

SOME of those vintage RV's have the shore power cord coiled up inside a box and inside that box is a 120 VAC (30 amp or 20 amp) Receptacles that's fed from your genset so you plug your RV cord into it so the genset can run your AC or other devices LOOK SEE IF INSIDE WHERE YOUR SHORE POWER CORD IS THERES A 120 VAC (may be 20 more likely 30 amp) OUTLET. If not there see where the gensets power outlet is located and see if you can pug your RV cord into it????????? NOTE SOME RV's have an automatic Transfer Switch that connects the gensets output (when its running) to the shore power inlet in which case you would NOT do as above and plug the power cord into a genset outlet

 

SOME gensets have an onboard circuit breaker, find it and see if its tripped????

Also look inside at the main 120 VAC (NOT the 12 VDC fuse panel) distribution panelboard and see if any AC circuit breakers or even the main breaker is tripped.

 

That's enough for you to digest for now, do some looking and post back, no sense in me covering every last detail and possibility until you give us more info

 

John T

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PS, right now it looks like I only need to replace the two front tires. The rear tires look newer and don't have cracks.

There is much more that appearance involved in tire condition. Have you checked the date code on the rear tires to see how old they are? Most "experts" will advice you to replace RV tires at some point in age of a tire that ranges from about 5 years to as much as 10 years for some of the newer, RV compounded tires. Modern steel belted tires do not survive well when sitting still and especially so if they sit on concrete or where they stay wet for long periods. A blown tire and be a major chore to replace along the highway. Your 91 RV probably has 16" tires so the won't be as high priced as the newer coaches built on the larger wheels.

 

The problem is not just one of safety but also of damage to the RV. It is very common for a tire that blows at highway speeds to do serious damage to the RV. It can damage the side of the RV around the wheel or even brake through the wheel well and has been known to take out brake lines of RV wiring or plumbing that passes through the area near the wheels. There is great risk to your family if traveling on old tires at highway speeds.

 

As to the "old" RV that was built in 1991, there are many of them on the roads that are much older. We just today finished the latest Escapees RV Club rally and there was a couple there who live all of the time in a 1963 bus that is converted to an RV, along with a wide range of other RVs of more than 20 years experience. New RVs are very nice, but they are not a requirement to travel in.

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Good information and lots to digest. I'm going to go out and see if I have a switch or something to flip to get the AC running from the Generator. I'll also go check the date code on the rear tires.

 

I'm almost getting depressed about this particular RV though. A really nice older couple came to look at it this afternoon. They decided not to buy it because of suspected water damage. I didn't remember seeing any evidence of water damage when we bought it. They pointed out ripples in the wallpaper in two of the ceiling panels. The wood feels soft behind the paper. I went back and looked at the photos I took when we bought it just a few weeks ago, and those ripples are not there. We had a windy rainstorm a few days ago and the only thing I can think of is that the previous owner kept it covered but this rainstorm dumped water into the wood. I couldn't have imagined it would damage it so quickly, but now it seems that some carpentry will be needed too.

 

Ive had several people come look at it but I think that water damage is going to scare most of them off. I'm probably going to have to keep this thing and put some sweat into the roof. Fixing the roof is the last thing I wanted to do.

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Woo Hoo! My joy-ometer just registered a little boost. (I'm easily amused)

 

There was a switch for GENERATOR / SHORE POWER that I must have forgotten to flip underneath one of the beds. I flipped it, turned on the generator, and lo and behold the coach air turned on. That's a huge relief. If I don't get this RV sold and we want to go somewhere before I can afford to fix the Chassis A/C,we can still stay cool by burning up some gas.

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Just a note....after being in the industrial refrigeration business since 1970, there is absolutely nothing wrong with using one of the alternate blends like Hot Shot in an older R-12 unit and not making the very unnecessary conversion to R-134A. The A/C shops will push for the R-134A conversion because they can short cut the conversion, charge you big bucks and pocket a big profit..

 

Glad you got the generator running.

 

Ken

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Just a note....after being in the industrial refrigeration business since 1970, there is absolutely nothing wrong with using one of the alternate blends like Hot Shot in an older R-12 unit and not making the very unnecessary conversion to R-134A. The A/C shops will push for the R-134A conversion because they can short cut the conversion, charge you big bucks and pocket a big profit..

 

Glad you got the generator running.

 

Ken

 

Thanks, that's good to know. I'm sure it woud be cheaper to fix the existing system than to convert it. I'll have to go look up pricing on Hot Shot.

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As I posted a few weeks ago, we just bought a 1991 Jamboree Rallye 27' motorhome for $4500. I basically paid for it with my tax refund. Last night my mechanic did a very thorough inspection.

 

Overall the motorhome is in good shape. My mechanic said that mechanically the RV seemed to be in good shape. On his list of failures, the alternator needs to be replaced soon, the front tires need immediate replacement, and the wiring to several running lights were broken - which needs to be fixed so I don't get a ticket. We're talking about $300 to $500 in repairs to get it roadworthy, which I can handle.

 

Unfortunately, the chassis A/C is not working. I didn't notice because it was cold out when I bought it. My mechanic can't diagnose it because he doesn't have equipment to test R12, he can only do R134.

 

My experience with AC has been that even when they give you a quote to repair it for $100, it might end up costing $1500 because as they replace one part they find other failed parts. Being that this thing is R12, I would have to pay a minimum of $240 to convert it to R134. That uncertainty makes me wonder if we should just sell this RV and find another one.

 

I knew someone years ago who could run his coach AC while driving. I'd almost rather buy a newer coach AC than repair the chassis AC, because of all the uncertainty in the cost of repairing chassis AC. So my first question:

 

Is there is a way to run my 110V coach AC via the inverter without frying all my electronics?

 

Second, does anyone make a 12V/110V coach AC that is under $600?

 

Third, am I crazy for wanting to cross the country with my family in a 24 year old RV?

 

Fourth, should I just sell it and look for a travel trailer?

A company makes a direct replacement for R12, no mods, no system cleaning, just pump out the R12 and replace with the new refrigerant.http://www.redtek.com/win_12a_prod.html

The RV age is not important if the proper pre-trip stuff has been done, as oldjohn said. Just don't push it trying to keep up with traffic and it should perform as designed.

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After all is said and done, try to learn more about your rig and what it is supposed to be able to do. Example: the switch (gen/shore power) was there, and with some new info, you searched for and found it. Just for info: Without a generator, there is not enough power in a rig to run the roof A/C. AC motors that start "under load" require more power, and systems normally have capacitors to help the motors start. No known inverter can output that much power. Another piece of info: Inverters do not change DC current to true AC current. Inverters change DC current to pulsed DC power which acts like AC current and will support low wattage AC motors, but not the fan/compressor motors in an A/C.

Re traveling in a used rig. Age is not the problem; condition is. I have a 2015 5th wheel, and sheared a pin in the left front landing gear (LG) on the first trip out. This problem brings me to another bit of info for you. I contacted the manufacturer of the LG, not the dealer who sold me the rig, nor the builder of the coach. The manufacturer gave me new pins to install without cost. So, I'm on the road again. While you're looking over the rig, look for loose electrical connections; tighten them. I had loose connectors in the DC fuse panel which caused fuses to the slide motors to blow every time we wanted to extend the slides. Needle nose pliers helped to eliminate that problem.

If you do any "boondocking" using only the onboard power, add another 12 volt battery of the deep cycle type. I stopped in a Walmart parking lot, and, next morning, had to have a "jump start" to my rig to roll in the slides. My jumper cables were not long enough to run from my truck batteries to the rig, and I could not unhitch because the LG worked off the 12 volt rig battery. Before the day was over, I purchased a second deep cycle battery.

I enjoy traveling, but expect the unexpected to happen now and then. New tires can blow out just as older tires. Remember that old saying: "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure." (I think I quoted it correctly.) Many times you can spot trouble before it happens.

Thanks for reading.

Walt W5WRB

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Just for completeness.....

 

You CAN run RV air conditioners from inverters if you set up the system correctly. It is being done today, and has been done for years. But not by many people. And you will not run them "forever". It requires the right inverters and the right battery bank. But it can be done. It is just not practical for most people.

 

An example of what can be done in this regard that is probably more recognizable to people is in commercial trucking. There is is now fairly common to run an air conditioner off a battery bank to keep the truck cool when not running the engine. There are issues with some of the systems out there - mainly because the battery banks are too small or the air conditioners do not have enough output. But these are now becoming more common.

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Good morning Walt, just to add a bit to your comments and provide information:

 

"No known inverter can output that much power."

 

I have seen Inverters that do indeed produce sufficient power to run a roof AC, but for small timers and especially with limited funds or shoestring budgets ITS JUST NOT AS PRACTICAL although it can be done. It requires sufficient battery banks and big enough Inverters is all.

 

" Another piece of info: Inverters do not change DC current to true AC current. Inverters change DC current to pulsed DC power which acts like AC current and will support low wattage AC motors"

 

This may just be semantics, but many people and lay persons IN GENERAL TERMS often say an Inverter changes DC into AC WHICH IS INDEED TRUE. Of course, there are different methods to perform that task...Since a step up or down transformer does NOT operate at pure DC, if the DC is pulsed or cycled its possible to achieve transformer action in order to increase or decrease its voltage (remember the old vibrators in car radios???, they produced chopped/cycled DC which could be transformed up to a higher voltage required for tubes). Cheaper low end Inverters produce a Modified or chopped wave that resembles a true sine wave but higher end more expensive inverters produce a near perfect sine wave. Some equipment does not respond well to chopped or pulsed or modified sine wave inputs and the manufacturers recommend ONLY pure sine wave inverters be used.

 

HOPE THIS HELPS

 

Note Im a long retired electrical engineer and rusty on this stuff so NO WARRANTY but I believe the above is still true and hasn't changed, but if so I stand corrected. There are other engineers on ere who can correct or confirm the above

 

Best wishes yall

 

John T

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PS to my post above: The Inverter I saw that ran a roof AC was something like 3500 or 5000 watt, I forget. The coach owner had 500 Amp Hours of batteries and over 500 watts of rooftop solar panels. I'm running a "compressor" motor with my measely 1000 watt pure sine wave inverter, its in a small dorm type 120 VAC fridge and its running just fine. My Inverter changes 12 VDC into pure sine wave 120 VAC. However its NOT a Modified Sine Wave Inverter which is a cheaper unit. Some older inverters didn't produce much more then a square wave which drove some electronic devices crazy lol. Some of the modern Modified or Sine Wave Inverters can run AC motors even roof top AC refrigeration compressors, although a pure sine wave is best. Inverters have come a long way baby lol

 

John T

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I think I need to fix the alternator, even if we sell it. We've had a few folks come out and look but so far they've all backed away when I gave them the list of repairs needed. Three of them lived a good distance away and I don't know if the alternator would get them home.

 

I emailed an alternator shop a photo of the alternator. They said it has a 60 amp alternator. (That seems amazingly low, even for 1991). They said they could give me a 150amp alternator that will bolt in for $140 (plus shipping). If we don't sell the RV this week, we've decided we're keeping it, so I 'd rather get an alternator sized to what we want. If we keep this RV we wil eventually put in two more batteries. One in the immediate future and maybe one more later this year. Is there any reason a 150amp alternator wouldn't be good enough?

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