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Yhis may have been asked and answered previously but I couldnt find the information. When I’ve fot shore power I plug in the CPAP when Im boon docking, which Im doing more of now I dont use the Cpap  And not get as good of sleep or feel npt as good next day. 
so how do some of you power your machine? I’ve got two 12 volt house batteries thanks for any help

George the Greek

Edited by George the greek
Forgot to sign it

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You basically have 2 options.

The most "efficient" method is to get a 12v converter for your CPAP and run it that way.

Likely, the more common method is many of us have inviters.  In my case my inverter powers all of my outlets in my RV.  I also have a larger battery bank with solar and generator backup for charging the batteries.  I probably spend around 90 nights/year in my RV and we mostly boondock. 

Edited by Nwcid

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20 minutes ago, Nwcid said:

You basically have 2 options.

The most "efficient" method is to get a 12v converter for your CPAP and run it that way.

Likely, the more common method is many of us have inviters.  In my case my inverter powers all of my outlets in my RV.  I also have a larger battery bank with solar and generator backup for charging the batteries.  I probably spend around 90 nights/year in my RV and we mostly boondock. 

I dont really understand all the technology but sounds like i need a 12 volt converter Purchased from someplace. Plugged into Cpap And where does the power end plug Go to. I believe all my outlets are 120. 

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3 minutes ago, George the greek said:

I dont really understand all the technology but sounds like i need a 12 volt converter Purchased from someplace. Plugged into Cpap And where does the power end plug Go to. I believe all my outlets are 120. 

I have no idea what RV you have, but most have a cigarette lighter style plug in them somewhere.  If not you can add one, or have one added.  

I am not sure what unit you have but here is an example for a common unit.  It also come with clamps to go direct to the battery, https://www.directhomemedical.com/resmed-airsense-10-cpap-dc-power-cord.html

Again your other option is to run on a battery pack.  There are many options out there now.  Keep in mind you will still need a way to charge it up every day or two.  I do not have first hand experience with this type of system, but from my understanding you may or may not be able to run your humidity.  For me that would not work.  Here are some examples from a basic search, https://www.cpap.com/plp/cpap-battery/ZT0zMDg

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An "inverter" takes the 12 volt DC power from your batteries and turns it into 110 volt AC power. That allows you to plug in typical appliances like your CPAP, computers, televisions, etc. without modifying them. But you have to be aware of the amount of power that your appliance(s) draw, and how long your batteries can run them without totally discharging the batteries. Some RV's have an inverter from the factory that is set up to supply power to the wall outlets.  This type of RV will often have four or more batteries to support the inverter but even then you have to be aware of your energy "budget" to avoid running the entire system down. 

The other solution described above is to either get a CPAP that is designed to run directly off of 12 volt DC power, or get an adapter (if available) for the CPAP you have that allows it to use 12 volt DC power. Then you won't need an inverter.  But the same consideration applies.  You need to determine how much power your CPAP uses, and if you have the battery capacity to run it all night, for however many nights you are out.  

Without knowing the energy usage of the CPAP it is difficult to give good advice. 

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I've used most solutions suggested above to run my previous Phillips Dreamstation CPAP in various RV's (and even tents before then) for decades. Last year I purchased a HDM Z2 Auto Travel APAP machine with the optional battery and the 12v adapter and it's changed everything. It runs off the 12v plugged into a lighter socket I mounted above my bed, it runs off the battery "dock" when needed or can be plugged into 120v outlets powered by my inverter. It's small but every bit as good as my full sized machine at home.  Take a look here to see more info - https://www.sleepdirect.com/travel-cpap/hdm-z2-auto-travel-apap-machine-with-z-breathe

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All good information I have a Springdale 19’ tt i’ve not seen a cigarette lighter type plug in there is a couple of USB outlets my cpap is a resmed ill check power requirements in the morning   I really should figure this out now that Im doing more and more boondocking you have given me information to get started with thank you

 

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Most of my stuff has been old but the most common place I have seen the 12v cigarette type outlet is near where ever your tv plugs in.  However if you are at all handy you can add one tying in to a  12 volt light fixture. I tied on into a fixture that I seldom if ever used. I guess I could have just eliminated the light fixture and wire direct but way back then I thought i might need the light once in a while. I plug a small inverter in then run a light duty extension cord to power a fan or my small tv.  I also don't think you will be  able to use the humidifier part of the cpap. I have had 2 and 3 batteries on my rig almost the entire time. True that if you get one that operates directly of 12 volts you will save some power by not having to convert 12v to 120v.  I have 2 100Watt solar panels that works pretty well unless I am parked mostly in the shade or get a period of almost no sun. I have bought the  12 sockets in boating section at a Walmart or a place that sells boat parts and most rv places should have them.

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6 hours ago, bigjim said:

True that if you get one that operates directly of 12 volts you will save some power by not having to convert 12v to 120v.

Unless the RV already has an inverter installed it would be far more simple to put in 1 or 2 of the 12V outlets than it would to add an inverter. If he uses a small inverter just to supply the cpap, then he still needs the 12V outlets. With only 2 batteries to supply it, I think that he would be better off with a 12V cpap and ad a couple of outlets for it. 

                                                                 71JaSySqWgL._AC_UL115_.jpg

A complete kit with 13' of wire that is fused for 15A and everything you need for $13 from Amazon. 

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I have used a CPAP nightly in my RV successfully for over a couple years so I will offer these suggestions:

1) The ENERGY (Amps X Volts X Time) required for MY Resmed CPAP on a typical night , which is subject to time of use, temperature, humidity and pressure settings, yours may be different, is around 25 Amp Hours used from my 12 Volt AGM battery bank over a typical night. A Kill A Watt meter can provide that information

2) If you can get a straight 12 VDC powered CPAP you will save the I Squared R Heat energy conversion losses VERSUS if you have a 120 VAC powered unit and have to use an Inverter which changes the 12 VDC from your batteries into 120 VAC to power a 120 volt CPAP.

3) If you rely upon or install (or use an existing) a 12 Volt DC Cigarette Lighter type of Power Outlet to run EITHER a straight 12 VDC CPAP      orrrrrrrrr      a small 12 VDC to 120 VAC Inverter sufficiently rated to power your 120 Volt CPAP, THE POWER OUTLET AND ITS WIRING NEEDS TO BE SUFFICIENTLY RATED. I have seen them in 100 Watts or 200 Watts or larger BUT NOTE ANY 12 VDC POWER OUTLET AND ITS WIRING MUST BE ADEQUATELY RATED TO POWER THE LOAD.

4) If possible to save valuable battery stored energy overnight energy I suggest use of a 12 VDC CPAP iffffffffffff available. HOWEVER if you use a 120 VAC CPAP then you need an adequate rated 12 VDC to120VAC Inverter (100, 200, 400, or however many watts ????? your machine requires) to change your 12 VDC battery power into 120 VAC to power your unit. 

5) You say you have two 12 Volt batteries: I have no idea of their total Amp Hour Energy Storage Capacity (maybe 160 maybe 200 maybe more maybe less rated Amp Hours ???) but if they are wet flooded lead acid or AGM it's best to not draw them down over 50% of their rated capacity meaning you may only have available 80 or 100 or more or less Amp Hours you could use overnight to power your CPAP SUBJECT TO THEIR SOC WHEN YOU WENT TO BED AND OTHER OVERNIGHT LOADS !!!!!!!!!!!!!! Talkin dry camping here !!

6) To determine how much ENERGY (Volts x Amps x Time) your CPAP requires overnight you could use a Kill A Watt Meter and again it depends on time of use, temperature, humidity and pressure. Mine takes 25 Amp Hours from my 12 VDC battery bank on a typical night, yours may be far different.

7) Its "possible" your two batteries might power your CPAP overnight and NOT reduce your batteries over 50% of their capacity HOWEVER that depends on your CPAP, 12 VDC or 120 VAC plus Inverter,  your batteries SOC when you went to bed (hopefully near 100%) ,,,,,,,other overnight loads like fans or furnaces or water pump etc etc ,  AND DONT FORGET YOU NEED TO RECHARGE THEM THE NEXT DAY

You ask "so how do some of you power your machine? I’ve got two 12 volt house batteries thanks for any help"

ANSWER   When dry camped I use a 12 VDC to 120 VAC Inverter powered from my AGM battery bank. A 12 VDC CPAP (if available) would be more efficient and eliminate any need for an Inverter. DO NOT discharge your FLA or AGM batteries over 50%. runs my CPAP

 If plugged to shore power no problem the 120 VAC outlets in the RV powers my CPAP 

For dry camping not plugged to shore power, YOU NEED TO DETERMINE YOUR CPAP ENERGY REQUIREMENTS THEN YOU CAN LOOK AT YOUR BATTERY CAPACITY AND OTHER LOADS  AND HOW TO RECHARGE ETC TO FIGURE THIS ALL OUT. Similar you need to look at any Inverter rating you need as well as any necessary 12 VDC circuit and 12 Volt Power Outlet if needed ratings. 

Best wishes let us know what happens and post back any questions

John T

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2 things,  do you guys think a modified sine wave inverter would be an issue for him with his machine.  And I am guessing with the colder tempratures the heated one might ablsolutely be necessary.

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I have used my Resmed  S-9 CPAP's on a Modified Sine Wave Inverter with no problems.  I have not tried our new S-10s on the MSW inverter.  Both the S-9 and S-10 I believe are 24 VDC units and if you buy the 12 Volt power supply from Resmed, you still have the power conversion loss of going going from 12 to 24 volts or 12 volts to 120 volts.  You will find the 12-120 volt conversion a lot cheaper. 

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1 hour ago, bigjim said:

2 things,  do you guys think a modified sine wave inverter would be an issue for him with his machine.  And I am guessing with the colder tempratures the heated one might ablsolutely be necessa

Big Jim, good questions. my thoughts (absent any specs or data for his machine so no warranty) are even if a cheaper Modified Sine Wave Inverter may work fine, I still for the record would advise use of a Pure Sine Wave PSW. While I've seen  problems with "some devices" powered with a MSW, I've NEVER seen problems caused using a PSW. In addition, the Inverter may be used at different times for different machines so if a person goes ahead and installs a PSW up front, there's less worry in the future. Many of the small cheap Inverters such as the cigarette lighter powered units are MSW.

Hey its a persons own free choice and there can be different opinions on this one, I would get a PSW but if others prefer MSW that's their own business lol BUT HIS MACHINE DESIGN AND SPECS (I don't have) ARE REQUIRED FOR A MORE ACCURATE ANSWER.

The pressure, heat and humidity settings on a CPAP are adjustable, my Doctor provided my initial figures but over time based on experience and comfort adjustments were made. Obviously if the environment was colder or dryer it may take more energy to bring the machines output up???

John T

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3 hours ago, bigjim said:

2 things,  do you guys think a modified sine wave inverter would be an issue for him with his machine.  And I am guessing with the colder tempratures the heated one might ablsolutely be necessary.

For the price of a PSW, why bother?

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I sure do appreciate all the good  information you all are sharing although its kinda over my hear. I've looked and there is no cigarete lighter plug in this rig. I looked at the batteries and the cpap machine and took pics of each hope that answers some of the questions you asked may have to upload separate.. I cant seem to upload pictures or even copy and paste Ill tell you what I found. Battery tag says no DC24  CCA@0 degrees F 500  MCA@32 degrees F 615   

23 Amp Ave. 150 Min if that tells you anything  Ii have two hooked together

the Cpap tag says --------DC24V      ------3.75 A   I'm hooked into power now for a week then will be boondocking again thanks for your interest in helping me understand

George

 

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Posting pictures directly on this forum is difficult. Use the tool HERE .

  • click on the link above and it will take you to the tool. You might want to place the tool link in your bookmarks or your browser bookmark bar for ease of access. Mine is in my bookmark bar so it is always on my screen.
  • The tool allows you to move a picture into their facility, and it will then create a proper link to paste into your post. This embeds the actual image into the post. It automatically sizes the picture appropriately. Follow the directions of the tool.
  • Once the tool creates the image link, simply copy it and paste it into your post where you want the picture to appear.
  • To test this, you can go to the "Test" section fo the forum and create a test post....just scroll down to the bottom of all of the sections and you will see the "Test" section.

Edited April 27, 2019 by Jack Mayer

Edit to add: The link above will give an extra set of "IMG" tags. Strip these off when pasting into the forum posting section.

Edited by Darryl&Rita

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    George, thanks for the updates. While a tag on a CPAP machine can provide valuable information including the necessary ratings for an Inverter and/or a 12 VDC cigarette lighter type power outlet and wiring, still, its actual ENERGY (Volts X Amps X Time) use depends on TEMPERATURE, PRESSURE, HUMIDITY AND USE TIME.  I used a Kill A Watt to determine MINE used up 25 Amp Hours of my 12 Volt stored battery energy overnight,  but of course different machines different users will be different.

 As I posted above any 12 VDC power outlet (be it a 100 or 200 or 300 or so watts) and any 12 VDC to 120 VAC Inverter and its wiring needs to be sufficiently rated to handle the load. While many smaller plug in type Inverters (100 or so Watt) may be Modified Sine Wave (MSW) and sure they "may" work fine, on one RV to allow for expansion I instead hard wired (direct to battery, NO plugs) a larger 400 Watt Pure Sine Wave (PSW) Inverter so I could also use it worry free on other appliances like a TV or Computer etc.  

 If you haven't already purchased a CPAP a 12 VDC powered would save you an Inverter plus energy, but if you already have a 120 Volt unit its fairly cheap and easy to install a sufficient rated 12 VDC Power Outlet and an Inverter (plug in type or hard wired no outlet required).

FYI just as an example to help you understand. Lets say you only had a small battery with 100 Amp Hours of energy storage capacity, meaning you only have 50 Amp Hours (if FLA or AGM) that's useable so as not to discharge over 50%. If when you went to bed and turned on your CPAP a 100 Amp Hour battery was 100% charged (likely not if you used lights and water pump and vent fans etc) and your CPAP consumed 25 Amp Hours overnight, you could (subject to SOC and use) "get by". However, if you also used much furnace or pumps or fans overnight or your weren't charged to 100% when started, you may not fare so well. 

PS you say you have two hooked together, maybe you have 150 to 200 Amp Hours max ?????? I cant say. Still, from what you describe, they sound more like starting batteries or at best RV Marine instead of true Deep Cycle, which sure still "work" for RV use, but not as well as a true Deep Cycle. A lot of gents who have room for two batteries and boondock often replace RV Marine or Starting batteries with a couple Deep Cycle 6 Volt Trojan T-105's in series for 12 volts and 225 Amp Hours.  

Subject to your energy requirements and how much and how long you want to boondock and need a CPAP, I would suggest a MINIMUM of 225 Battery Amp Hours of true Deep Cycle Batteries (such as two six Volt Trojan T-105's in series).  Then of course you need either Solar or a Genset the next day to recharge.         

 You got this, you're asking good questions and what you need isn't rocket science lol easy peasey !!! But you need adequate battery capacity and a means to recharge regardless

DISCLAIMER an Energy Audit is required to answer your questions and absent any hard data the above can ONLY be a rough approximation and guess NOT accurate......... 

 John T    Hey I'm tying my best to inform but not overwhelm you lol

 

Edited by oldjohnt

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2 hours ago, Jinx & Wayne said:

My wife has a battery pack made for her cpap.  If necessary we can recharge it from the A/C plug in the tow vehicle or run the generator. 

that would be a good idea do you know where they are available?

george

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On 10/1/2020 at 7:41 PM, George the greek said:

I sure do appreciate all the good  information you all are sharing although its kinda over my hear. I've looked and there is no cigarete lighter plug in this rig. I looked at the batteries and the cpap machine and took pics of each hope that answers some of the questions you asked may have to upload separate.. I cant seem to upload pictures or even copy and paste Ill tell you what I found. Battery tag says no DC24  CCA@0 degrees F 500  MCA@32 degrees F 615   

23 Amp Ave. 150 Min if that tells you anything  Ii have two hooked together

the Cpap tag says --------DC24V      ------3.75 A   I'm hooked into power now for a week then will be boondocking again thanks for your interest in helping me understand

George

 

Your CPAP rating of 3.75A at 24V DC power would be the max power the CPAP will use.  If you can be comfortable using the CPAP w/o having the humidifier or a hose heater turned on you should find that the CPAP will pull about 1 amp or less for just the electronics and the blower. 

My wife uses her 12V CPAP very night and it pulls less than 1 amp, w/o the humidifier on.  Her CPAP plugs directly into a 12V outlet with an adapter we bought from the CPAP maker. 

Your CPAP is a 24V DC machine.  The standard power cord likely has a little box in the cord that converts the 120V AC to the 24V DC the CPAP needs.   You can buy a 12V to 24V adapter like this one:  https://www.amazon.com/Converter-Regulator-Adapter-Vehicle-DC9-20V/dp/B01EFUHGMU/ref=sr_1_3?crid=FJN6W68VOJB9&dchild=1&keywords=12v+to+24v+dc+step+up+converter&qid=1601756218&sprefix=12v+to+24%2Caps%2C172&sr=8-3

This following link will help you understand the use and operation of the 12V systems and batteries used in an RV.  It will also really help with all the terminology you saw used in the replies.

The 12volt Side of Life (Part 1)

The 12 volt Side of Life Part 2

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22 hours ago, George the greek said:

that would be a good idea do you know where they are available?

george

George, what you asked about are called "Portable Power Packs" which many low energy requirement RV folks are taking advantage of versus more expensive heavy duty high powered battery/solar/inverter systems.  In your case such a unit, if it can store and deliver your CPAP power and energy ??? mines ONLY 25 Amp Hours per night, could be charged up during the day by plugging into a standard (to the extent available ???) 120 VAC household outlet. They store ENERGY often using Lithium DC batteries and have an internal Inverter for 120 VAC use overnight or whenever its needed. Its a simple among one of many methods to store up  energy for later use. ALL SUBJECT TO YOUR CPAP'S POWER AND ENERGY REQUIREMENT !!!!!!!!!!!!!

https://www.doityourselfrv.com/portable-power-shower/

https://www.amazon.com/Jackery-Portable-Solar-Ready-Generator-Emergency/dp/B07SM5HBK1/ref=asc_df_B07SM5HBK1/?tag=bingshoppinga-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=&hvpos=&hvnetw=o&hvrand=&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=e&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=&hvtargid=pla-4583932704382280&psc=1

John T

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My two cents:

I use a Resmed CPAP machine.  It runs on twenty-four volts DC.  I have powered it from 120v AC when on shore-power and from an inverter while boondocking.  When boondocking I switch off the humidifier "option."  I, personally and without any knowledge, see the humidifier as a "hot plate" like device that just adds to the electricity draw.  

My batteries are two AGM batteries and one pair of six volt golf cart batteries.  

Recently I purchased (for around a hundred bucks?) a "device" from Resmed that will "bump up" the voltage from twelve to twenty-four volts DC.  As a snowbird I plan to use this device when boondocking.  I wired in twelve volts DC from a handy bedside lamp.  

I did purchase (using Craigslist) a twelve volt CPAP machine.  It was too basic and too noisy for my DW.  It's buried in the basement of my MH for emergencies.  

YMMV

Bill, NA8M

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