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Propane vs Electric use on refrigerator


charlyhors

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Go here and see the discussion from last year.

 

Generally, unless there is a huge difference, we run electric. It is just so much easier for us and save the propane for heating.

 

 

Barb

Barb & Dave O'Keeffe
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Of course, it depends on the price of LPG and Electric, but when LP is say $1.50 and electric is say 12 cents, LP may??? be (Id have to do the math, but Im too lazy lol) the cheaper heat source. However, electric resistance heat doesn't waste it out a chimney/vent like a conventional forced air gas furnace does. Id opt for the easiest and most convenient unless the price difference was drastic.

 

Keep warm now

 

John T

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The frig uses little propane or electricity and the difference is minimal. AS noted, the electric use, saves wear and tear on the burner.

 

Ken

Amateur radio operator, 2023 Cougar 22MLS, 2022 F150 Lariat 4x4 Off Road, Sport trim <br />Travel with 1 miniature schnauzer, 1 standard schnauzer and one African Gray parrot

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I once figured this out, but forget the math now. Bottom line, 22 cents per KWH is the break-point for cost-assuming 100% efficiency for both fuels. Electricity is virtually 100% efficient but LP is lower. Counting effeciency of both fuels the break-point is somewhere around 18 cents.

That's from a an old man with low memory cells. I'll have to do the math again, this time keeping it on my computer.

 

2000 Winnebago Ultimate Freedom USQ40JD, ISC 8.3 Cummins 350, Spartan MM Chassis. USA IN 1SG retired;Good Sam Life member,FMCA ." And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you--ask what you can do for your country.  John F. Kennedy 20 Jan 1961

 

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I once figured this out, but forget the math now. Bottom line, 22 cents per KWH is the break-point for cost-assuming 100% efficiency for both fuels. Electricity is virtually 100% efficient but LP is lower. Counting effeciency of both fuels the break-point is somewhere around 18 cents.

Based upon what price for propane? That has varied quite widely over recent years. But even so the savings for one over the other is pretty small as compared to the convenience factor.

Good travelin !...............Kirk

Full-time 11+ years...... Now seasonal travelers.
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I agree Kirk, I just figured it out of curiosity from old posts I had read here many years ago. I think it was figured on cost of each fuel supply. Seems like multiplying elect cost X 22, then comparing the result to LP cost told you which was cheaper to use. Those old posts and my math were lost at the website host changeover, don't even remember when that happened now.

If I had that old webpage's exact address, perhaps I could find it with the waybackmachine.

Once on the internet it is always there _ somewhere.

 

2000 Winnebago Ultimate Freedom USQ40JD, ISC 8.3 Cummins 350, Spartan MM Chassis. USA IN 1SG retired;Good Sam Life member,FMCA ." And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you--ask what you can do for your country.  John F. Kennedy 20 Jan 1961

 

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We always use electric when we can. Unless there is a huge spike in electric prices, I figure the labor of breaking camp to refill motorhome propane tank (or portable tanks) outweighs cost of electric.

 

Also, I might just be getting lazy in my old(er) age.

HB

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In almost every case that I have figured it out, the electricity came out cheaper. That was using actual costs and assuming a 70% efficiency on an RV furnace. Which is unlikely. And you don't have to "go get" electric.

Jack & Danielle Mayer #60376 Lifetime Member
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We use electric when available and nearly always have to pay the bill. Going to get propane is a hassle and an added expense. I am not sure the electric side of these RV type refrigerators is very efficient though. Both electric and propane heat the same way and lose heat up the flue.

Randy

2001 Volvo VNL 42 Cummins ISX Autoshift

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SILLY ME, I just read your OP and my response and realized, SORRY I was thinking about the furnace instead of the Fridge grrrrrrrrrrrrrr

 

On the fridge Id definitely use AC anytime I'm hooked up (mines set to choose that automatically). Less carbon and sooting then that LP flame and electrical usage is very small.

 

John T

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Playing Devil's Advocate to all saying electricity saves wear and tear on the fridge : electric allows the formation of rust on the flue walls. Flip a coin, pick your poison.

I have been wrong before, I'll probably be wrong again. 

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If you are talking furnace vs electrical heaters, we use both. Our furnace heats the bays, so when very cold it comes on during the night to make sure bays stay warm. During day, evening we use space heaters. That way we can go the complete winter without moving the coach to refill propane. Our tank is 32 gallons so will last a typical winter in Mesa with lots to spare. Water heater & frig on electric all the time. Fridge does use propane when traveling.

 

Barb

Barb & Dave O'Keeffe
2002 Alpine 36 MDDS (Figment II), 2018 Ford C-Max HYBRID
Blog: http://www.barbanddave.net
SPK# 90761 FMCA #F337834

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