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singling volvo


drumtwister

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Hey does anyone care to share the ballpark price you spent on singling out your tractor. Man the places I asked about having it done prices are a huge difference. I'm not the type to go with the cheapest either but the spread for some is up to $1700.00 difference. They are all reputable places with alignment racks and know about proper angles to maintain. I live in SE MI if anyone from Ohio to Michigan has had it done around there any info would be appreciated.

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If you want to travel a bit I know a guy in the west side of Toronto in Milton ON about 3 hrs from Detroit that might work for you. Very trustworthy and does not overcharge. Your US $ is worth 25% more right now as well in Canada. Send me a PM if you want his info.

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Drumtwister, We had ours done in NW Ohio and the service was great and not overpriced. They took the time to consult us as anything arose and we came away completely satisfied. pm me or email me and I can give you the name. If you are on FB go to my page=photos=albums=VOLVO build. Good Luck and Welcome! You'll find that HDT is the only way to go!

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If I singled short, I would do it this way.. easy and quick.

 

Cut the front U bolts

Drag axle out

Cut rear u bolts

Move rear axle forward

put on new u bolts

get new driveshaft made

 

(have it supported well as when you grind/cut that u bolt, it will give a snap when the metal breaks)

 

no need to cut and huck bolts, etc.. just drill a new torque rod like PSD mentioned. You would not even need to relocate your height adjustment rod.

 

The front axle has the correct angle Z springs you need for singling. Do a search for a few of my threads and you can see the headache I had learning that lesson.

 

Singling short also gives you plenty of room to add your hitch, etc.. without adding frame.

 

I singled long and still thinking of adding a bit of space to give about 10ft of usable bed space.

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The front axle has the correct angle Z springs you need for singling. Do a search for a few of my threads and you can see the headache I had learning that lesson.

On a Gen2 truck the springs are NOT the same. Use the springs (both Z and radius springs) that are already on the rear axle.

 

Singling short also gives you plenty of room to add your hitch, etc.. without adding frame.

But the crossmember will probably be in the way depending on your hitch choice.

 

 

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Ray_nomad, on 11 Feb 2015 - 2:49 PM, said:

 

PEIFamily, on 11 Feb 2015 - 12:56 PM, said:

 

 

The front axle has the correct angle Z springs you need for singling. Do a search for a few of my threads and you can see the headache I had learning that lesson.

On a Gen2 truck the springs are NOT the same. Use the springs (both Z and radius springs) that are already on the rear axle.

 

Singling short also gives you plenty of room to add your hitch, etc.. without adding frame.

But the crossmember will probably be in the way depending on your hitch choice.

 

 

 

Mine were not the same, I ended up having to use the ones off my front axle.

 

That is true about the cross member, but if I recall right, he has a 2005-2007 Volvo? He should be able to single short and then put his hitch right up to the crossmember that was in front of the rear tandem. Or if he did ET Hitch, he may be able to omit the rear crossmember and use the ethitch framing if he needed to shorten, but Henry would be the guy to answer that.

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Mine were not the same, I ended up having to use the ones off my front axle.

 

That is true about the cross member, but if I recall right, he has a 2005-2007 Volvo? He should be able to single short and then put his hitch right up to the crossmember that was in front of the rear tandem. Or if he did ET Hitch, he may be able to omit the rear crossmember and use the ethitch framing if he needed to shorten, but Henry would be the guy to answer that.

Same for me. I have a 2007 670, used the front springs. Only moved the axel with new u bolts. No driveshaft angle issues when completed. I moved my cross member forward and modified it to make the truck shorter overall. Back of cab to end of bed is now just over 10 feet total. I am using a TrailerSaver TSLB. It is singled short of course.

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Mine were not the same, I ended up having to use the ones off my front axle.

 

That is true about the cross member, but if I recall right, he has a 2005-2007 Volvo? He should be able to single short and then put his hitch right up to the crossmember that was in front of the rear tandem. Or if he did ET Hitch, he may be able to omit the rear crossmember and use the ethitch framing if he needed to shorten, but Henry would be the guy to answer that.

My bad...brain fart. Front springs radius are the ones with the correct angle, Rears have about a 10 degree pitch up.

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Yep, I found that out the expensive way lol

As did I. $1k+ education

Weird thing is the slight vibration caused by the unequal universal angles was only apparent when accelerating in 9th gear. Made me crazy for almost two years before I realized what the problem was.

Turns out the shop that singled assumed (you know how that goes) it was the same as a Gen 1 truck where the springs are the same front and back. Don't know how they missed the obvious disparity in the angles.

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How is the ride singled short? Some have told me it is much rougher.

Goes with the old proverb, "Opinions are like, oh well, everybody has one". There is probably no bigger group of "singlers" than the HDT crowd on this forum, who drives them. You will alter the behavior of the truck significantly (in not a good way) by singling short or mid, and not so much by singling long. It has nothing to do with ride quality but the fact that you unbalanced the front axle to rear axle weight distribution and the rear axle braking is compromised. Solution to that is, as Jack says above, put the weight back in that areas, typically by installing substantial deck or hauler body. And don't be "tempted" by pretty aluminum, have it made of steel and plenty of it.

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How is the ride singled short? Some have told me it is much rougher.

We're short with barely 8k on the rear empty and the ride is smooth. You have to remember, that you actually ride on 3 air sources, the seat is air ride, the cab is air ride, and the truck suspension is air ride. You may bounce in the seat some, but there are no jolts, road vibrations, etc. I can hear when the tires hit expansion joints, but never felt one.

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A major, big assumption here. So what I'm hearing...not to hijack...is that you can single short, mid, or long. It doesn't matter as far as ride quality goes. Your decision is based upon how you want to use the deck. Secondly, and maybe most importantly, whatever you do, make sure you're adding appropriate weight to the rear axle (more weight if singled long and less weight if singled short). Is that a calculation that you folks make?

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A major, big assumption here. So what I'm hearing...not to hijack...is that you can single short, mid, or long. It doesn't matter as far as ride quality goes. Your decision is based upon how you want to use the deck. Secondly, and maybe most importantly, whatever you do, make sure you're adding appropriate weight to the rear axle (more weight if singled long and less weight if singled short). Is that a calculation that you folks make?

 

It's probably not entirely correct to say that there's no difference as far as ride quality. Longer wheelbases result in more time between "bumps", so increasing the wheelbase of any vehicle typically results in the perception of improved ride quality. That said, the difference is not so great that ride quality should be a significant consideration when laying out an RV hauler, since the ride is typically very good regardless of the wheelbase. Also, increasing wheelbase directly affects maneuverability, which is generally a more significant consideration.

 

How you plan to utilize the available space resulting from the final layout of your truck is the prime consideration, and is generally the deciding factor when singling.

 

All highway tractor to RV hauler conversions will benefit from the addition of weight on the rear axle, regardless of wheelbase, because the more weight added to the rear, the less it will handle like a bobtail tractor -- which is to say, terribly. The closer any vehicle gets to a 50/50 weight distribution, the more predictable the handling will be, especially in less than ideal road conditions. Where you place the additional weight, relative to the front and rear axles, is more important than the wheelbase of the vehicle.

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I've owned a Volvo 610 182" wb singled short, and a Volvo 780 230" wb singled mid at the same time. So I did back to back comparisons with them....moving from one to the other.

 

There really was not a significant difference in ride. If pushed I'd say the 780 was not quite as "choppy" in really bad continuous bumps. But that is really pushing it....there really was not a noticeable difference to me. BTW, the 780 has front airbags as well....it helps some, but not enough that I'd be looking for them.

 

There WAS a noticeable difference in the maneuverability, and it was significant. The 610 was set up to be a daily driver, taking the place of an F550. Which it easily outmaneuvered and rode far better as well. It had 6" more wheelbase as compared to the 550. It was far more truck in any respect you would like to compare other than height. There was simply nothing the 550 could do as well other than get into a parking garage.

 

The 780, as compared to the 610 is not near as nimble, and it is noticeable in every day driving. Does it stop me from doing anything? No, but I do pay more attention to where I go. A tractor this size singled long would be a bear to maneuver in the RV application IMO. Given a choice. I realize a number of people have tractors singled long and are doing fine with them. But unless you have a REASON to single long my recommendation is to carefully consider it before doing it.

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