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Major Data Breach - Equifax


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Take action now! About half the USA population has had their passwords, social security numbers all personal data breached at Equifax, one of the three major credit credit reporting companies. Included in the breach are credit card numbers and Social Security numbers emails, passwords, everything!

Excerpt:

"Hackers stole a treasure trove of financial data from a top credit-reporting company, potentially exposing the personal information of roughly half the US population.

Equifax said Thursday that thieves stole customer names, Social Security numbers, birthdates and addresses in a hack that stretched from mid-May and July. The data taken affected as many as 143 million people.

The number of affected people is roughly half of the US population of 323 million. The number reported by Equifax doesn't include victims from around the world. 

"This is clearly a disappointing event and one that strikes at the heart of who we are and what we do," Equifax CEO Rick Smith said in a video released Thursday. In a separate statement, Equifax said it is working with law enforcement on an investigation. 

The breach, which was particularly potent because one company held such a large amount of sensitive information, is among the largest in US history and the biggest known leak of 2017. Yahoo lost data on roughly a record 1 billion accounts in 2013, the web portal said last year.

You can check if your data was leaked at Equifax's website. Here's a step-by-step on how to find out if you were affected by the Equifax hack."

If the link above did not work click here: https://www.equifaxsecurity2017.com/

 

Edited by RV_
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I am pretty illiterate when it comes to computers and data systems. Curious how Equifax had/has all the passwords for other companies in their data files? 

One notice I read said "Equifax had a massive breach today potentially affecting over 143 million people. Your birth date, Social Security number, address, and driver's license number may be making its way to the Dark Web this moment."

I can see how this information would allow new accounts to be opened and use the can not remember user ID or password functions to access current accounts. I don't see how changing passwords would prevent those kind of attacks.

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Equifax or any other corporation should be held financially liable to all consumers accounts!! This is total irresponsibility to their clients! If I had your ID numbers and personal info, and I let it slip to someone and then was used to gain profit then I would be responsible for the loss! 

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On 9/8/2017 at 1:44 PM, trailertraveler said:

I am pretty illiterate when it comes to computers and data systems. Curious how Equifax had/has all the passwords for other companies in their data files?

It doesn't.  The press release the OP quoted said: "Equifax said Thursday that thieves stole customer names, Social Security numbers, birthdates and addresses in a hack that stretched from mid-May and July."

I have no clue where the OP got the idea to say the breach included emails (whatever that refers to) and passwords.

On 9/9/2017 at 8:44 AM, mrfrank said:

A multi-billion class action has been filed in Oregon. Didn't take the sharks long to jump in! I do think that Equifax owes restitution, just don't like half of it going to lawyers!

Lawyers generally get a third, not a half.  And you're free to not opt in, and you can even bring your own lawsuit against Equifax if you'd prefer.  Since it won't be a class action, maybe you can find a lawyer who, instead of taking a cut if you win, will bill you hourly for all the work as it goes along.  At least that would be sure money in his pocket; contingency cases run the risk of the lawyer not getting paid at all.

 

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On ‎9‎/‎8‎/‎2017 at 7:44 PM, rynosback said:

Read the fine print on signing up for the one free year.  It automatically re-enroles you.  But the big kicker is that by signing up, you agree not to sue them in the future.

You will not automatically be re-enrolled.  From the link RV gave in his original post:

"3) Clarification Regarding Automatic Sign-Up to TrustedID Premier
We are not requesting consumers’ credit card information when they sign up for the free credit file monitoring and identity theft protection we are offering to all U.S. consumers. Consumers who sign up for TrustedID Premier will not be automatically enrolled or charged after the conclusion of the complimentary year of TrustedID Premier."

You also will not be waiving your rights:

"5) Adjusted the TrustedID Premier and Clarified Equifax.com
We’ve added an FAQ to our website to confirm that enrolling in the free credit file monitoring and identity theft protection that we are offering as part of this cybersecurity incident does not waive any rights to take legal action. We removed that language from the Terms of Use on the website, www.equifaxsecurity2017.com. The Terms of Use on www.equifax.com do not apply to the TrustedID Premier product being offered to consumers as a result of the cybersecurity incident."

 

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Blues,

The initial reports said they they got our email addresses, and of course if you have done a free annual credit report or gotten protection before, those passwords for each credit reporting agency are also stolen. I am a techie and have been doing computers and repairs since the early 80s both on the job in the USAF and after I retired.

It has been my experience that many people have one or at most two passwords, and none of them admit that online. It is also known that 6.07% of the users worldwide are still running XP. Those running currently supported versions Windows OS do not do their applications updates for many reasons some of which are bootleg versions of applications, Windows, or both. Secunia just found that 12% of Windows users do not update other applications. So add that 12% to the 6% that do not update windows,  and adding in the 6.01% who still use XP, you have a whopping 24 - 25% of unpatched machines out there. These are, in my experience, the people who use only one or two passwords, and who will be most at risk from the Equifax breach.

https://betanews.com/2016/08/11/patched-windows-machines/

http://news.softpedia.com/news/windows-7-still-king-of-the-desktop-despite-windows-10-creators-update-launch-517582.shtml#sgal_0

I have a friend who still has a computer repair storefront and his clientele want no large fees for leaving their data intact and recover from an infection or recalcitrant system. They pay 60 bucks to have it factory restored. Over and over. I won't do that.

This breach included the complete credit files for the sections breached.

If you believe your email address is sacrosanct do a search on yourself and then pay for the full info and you will be amazed. Add to that your credit report data and things can get sticky fast.

If you read differently please include links to your good source. I always do.

 

Excerpt:

"If you're not worried about the Equifax hack, you should be.

The hackers made off with the most crucial tools that identity thieves need to impersonate you. The worst-case scenario is a very real threat to millions of Americans.

If the stolen information from Equifax gets into the wrong hands, experts say data thieves can open bank accounts, lines of credit, new credit cards and even drivers' licenses in your name. They can saddle you with speeding tickets, steal your tax refund, swipe your Social Security check and prevent you from getting prescription drugs.

Recovering from identity theft could take months or even years. And no one is responsible for cleaning up your own mess but you.

What the hackers stole

Equifax estimates that the hack impacts 143 million Americans. The thieves stole names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses and a yet-to-be-determined number of driver's license numbers.

The hackers also made off with 209,000 credit card numbers and 182,000 documents containing personally identifying information.

What thieves can do with that information

The data stolen in the Equifax hack is extremely valuable to cyberthieves. All that information packaged together sells for upwards of $30 per identity on online black markets, according to Mark Nunnikhoven, head of cloud research for cybersecurity firm Trend Micro.

"That's the foundational identification information for U.S. consumers," said Nunnikhoven. "It's enough to allow cyberthieves to take over you online."

If a cybercriminal maxed out a credit card in your name, you'll have a very difficult time passing a credit check. Good luck getting a new cell phone, a student loan, a car or a mortgage.

If a data thief took out a prescription using your identity, that goes on your medical record. That could seriously screw up your ability to get treatment at a hospital or from your pharmacy, particularly if the fraudster obtained medicine that counteracts with yours."

Source: http://money.cnn.com/2017/09/11/technology/equifax-identity-theft/index.html

 

Edited by RV_
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25 minutes ago, RV_ said:

...if you have done a free annual credit report or gotten protection before, those passwords for each credit reporting agency are also stolen...

I am not so sure this is true for everyone. I just did an annual credit check and there was no request for my email or to establish a password. I have done these checks of all three major credit agencies for years and have to the best of my knowledge never had to set up a password. We have also had freezes put on at all three agencies and it had to be done in writing to keep it on for very long. I keep track of all my passwords (dozens of different ones) in a hand written log not on a database or in the computers. I have no record of any passwords for any of the credit agencies.

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Probably not. They have mine from signing up for mine. Does that invalidate the need to check, see, and take advantage of the free monitoring they are providing. I did my free credit reports earlier this year so I will likely have to pay for them.

Sheesh folks don't kill the messenger especially when I provided a link to the source I was using.

Here is the latest since I did see someone arguing about the clkause regarding lawsuits etc.

A Progress Update for Consumers

September 8, 2017

We understand that some consumers are experiencing difficulties getting the answers and support they need through our website and call center. Ramping up the website and call center to handle the anticipated volume is ongoing and we are focused on making improvements as quickly as possible. We apologize for any inconvenience this process has created.

Thus far today, we’ve made the following adjustments:

1) You Can Determine Your Status Immediately
Some consumers who visited the website soon after its launch failed to receive confirmation clarifying whether or not they were potentially impacted. That issue is now resolved, and we encourage those consumers to revisit the site to receive a response that clarifies their status.

2) No Waiver Of Rights For This Cyber Security Incident
In response to consumer inquiries, we have made it clear that the arbitration clause and class action waiver included in the Equifax and TrustedID Premier terms of use does not apply to this cybersecurity incident.

3) Expanded Our Call Center
We have tripled our call center team to over 2000 agents and continue to add agents.

Our goal is to make this process as convenient and consistent as possible. We will continue to identify steps to improve this process.

And we will continue as well to listen to your comments and suggestions.


 

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I am just finished with my bank and insurance company which both are from the same company. They suggested I increase my security. In addition to my ID and password, then the pin, and then a security question, they will now cybertext me with a six digit additional random password generated with each transaction and they send it to me in text. Thankfully we are simple folks and all our credit cards, bank accounts, and checking savings accounts are all with them. So we both enabled three factor cyber text security and I feel confidant that draining our accounts will be difficult.

I am going to enroll in the free Identity theft protection offered by Equifax. That and the additional security we just instituted for our accounts should be all we need.

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Thank you for your efforts Derek!  I will enroll in their free monitoring service. I also monitor my bank accounts, IRA account, and of course Discover card updates my credit score daily for free, It's a good indicator of financial activity under my name and SSN. My score reflected our new MH tire purchase on my Discover card by the end of that day. Paid off the Discover and my credit score returned to its former number 5 days later.

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15 minutes ago, Ray,IN said:

...Discover card updates my credit score daily for free, It's a good indicator of financial activity under my name and SSN...

I mentioned this before, but it must be on one of the other threads (there are three running on the same topic, very confusing). Discover has a new free service for card holders that searches the web for the social security number associated with your account and will notify you if it shows up on suspect sites and notify you if any new credit cards, mortgages, car loans or other accounts are opened on your Experian  credit report. You can read about it or sign up here.

Edited by trailertraveler
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Trailertraveler,

I posted in the three forums so our members got the news and links to the source information soonest. The Source links were in each one. I've only done that once before several years ago. The source links are there in case I poorly word something. Please always read the source links in case I miss something. 

If one is involved the credit protection is free.

Edited by RV_
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20 hours ago, RV_ said:

Sheesh folks don't kill the messenger especially when I provided a link to the source I was using.

I did look at the link.  But you said in your post:  "Included in the breach are credit card numbers and Social Security numbers emails, passwords, everything!"

Nothing in the link you provided says that emails (I assume you mean email addresses) or passwords were stolen. 

And, even if email addresses were included, who cares?  Despite my best efforts, I haven't been able to stop people from including my email address in huge cc lists, and I don't think I'm unique.  So everybody's email addresses are already all over the place.

Passwords?  Yes, that would be a problem, but I haven't seen a single report that says passwords were stolen in this breach.  Obviously I can't provide a link, unless you want me to provide a link to every report that doesn't say passwords were stolen, but I don't think that would be helpful.  Equifax isn't saying passwords are stolen, but I know better than to trust anything they say.  But nobody else is saying it, either.  Well, except you.

 

18 hours ago, RV_ said:

Thankfully we are simple folks and all our credit cards, bank accounts, and checking savings accounts are all with them. So we both enabled three factor cyber text security and I feel confidant that draining our accounts will be difficult.

I would suggest that you diversify some of this.  It's convenient to have everything in one place, but if that one place goes down for some reason, you're in a heap of trouble if all of your accessible money and credit are in that one place.

Same as having one password--it's convenient, but risky.

 

Quote

I am going to enroll in the free Identity theft protection offered by Equifax.

I'm no computer expert, but Equifax is the last place I'm going to sign up for anything.  They already know waaaay too much about me, none of which I've voluntarily provided to them, and handle that information carelessly.  No way I'm giving them anything.

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So, color me skeptical. Major players sell stock while prices are high. Then report

a major data breach. Then offer paltry, one year ID monitoring. Be interesting to 

see who buys Equifax stock at a discounted price. And, see how many "customers"

receive upsell emails to continue Id monitoring/protection. I don't disbelieve that

there was, possibly, a data breach, but I'm watching how they are going to turn

this into a "positive" for them financially, while we all get royally "massaged".

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To each their own but if folks think that this is the first time someone has got your Name, SSN BD etc  and somehow not giving them the last 6 is going to keep you safe well then I got a bridge for sale that I would like to talk to you about.  I agree with Linda, we did not give them this info but they sure as hell have it and those are just the facts.  I have enrolled both the DW and I and could care less about given up the last 6 of my SSN.  This is the world we live in today and weather we like it or not it is the one we are forced to deal with.

Dennis

 

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