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Start 'er up or let 'er sit?


NH2

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I have an '06 International 4400.  Last year, I took a teaching job in a native village in Alaska. We enjoyed our adventure so much, we signed up for another year in the Arctic—our village is on an island approx. 39 miles off the coast of Siberia.  The truck sat all last year and will again this coming year.  
Here's my question...
Yesterday, Sue & I arrived at our storage unit to check on our truck-n-trailer and to swap out some clothing.  Should I start the truck, drive it around for an hour or should I just let it sit?  
Worth noting:
The truck batteries have been on trickle-charge.
Last year, I placed additive to the fuel.
Thanks for your input,

Mark

Mark & Sue---SKP#86611
'06 International 4400LoPro DT570 310hp 950ft-lbs.-Allison--3.70 gears
'05 36' Teton Liberty
'12 BMW F650 twin
 

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I agree with Jim. Get her warm and exercised. You don't want her to fell unloved.

 

Brad

Brad and Jacolyn
Tucker the Wonder dog and Brynn the Norfolk Terrier
2009 Smart "Joy"
2004 VNL630 "Vonda the Volvo"
2008 Hitch Hiker 35 CK Champagne Edition
VED12 465 HP, Freedomline, 3.73 ratio, WB 218"
Fulltiming and loving it.

 

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When you parked it, did you fog the cylinders as per spindrift?  If so, don't mess with it.  If not, run it until warm, then that much again, and fog it.  Seal intake and exhaust openings.

KW T-680, POPEMOBILE
Newmar X-Aire, VATICAN
Lots of old motorcycles, Moto Guzzi Griso and Spyder F3 currently in the front row
Young enough to play in the dirt as a retired farmer.
contact me at rickeieio@yahoo.com

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I'll add that running it, in my mind, is getting the engine up to operating temperature, which will never happen by simply idling in a parking spot.  So, run it like you stole it, as they say.  Keep the truck in a lower gear if you have to.  

2012 F350 KR CC DRW w/ some stuff
2019 Arctic Fox 32-5M
Cindy and Tom, Kasey and Maggie (our Newfie and Berner)
Oh...I forgot the five kids.

 

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What is this "Fog It"?

 

I only start and run  before my semi annual trips now. First year of ownership I would take it out for a drive every couple weeks, but doubt that it ever really got up to temperature, since I did not hook up to the trailer. Hard to really get everything up to working temperature without a load. (bobtail). 

 

Rod. 

 

White 2000/2010Volvo VNL 770 with 7' Drom box with opposing doors,  JOST slider hitch. 600 HP Cummins Signature 18 Speed three pedal auto shift.

1999 Isuzu VehiCross retired to a sticks and bricks garage. Brought out of storage the summer of 2022

2022 Jeep Wrangler Sport S Two door hard top.

2007 Honda GL 1800

2013 Space Craft Mfg S420 Custom built Toyhauler

The Gold Volvo is still running and being emptied in July. 

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There are fogging sprays.  Most common in the marine industry.  Easily purchased at a marine store.  Product is designed to cling to cylinder walls.  In a diesel motor, the prescribed method for application is through the intake.  However, the time, effort and expense is only warranted for extended periods of "sleep".

2012 F350 KR CC DRW w/ some stuff
2019 Arctic Fox 32-5M
Cindy and Tom, Kasey and Maggie (our Newfie and Berner)
Oh...I forgot the five kids.

 

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Years ago I was introduced to Lubri-Gas and they have Lubri-diesel too.  It is a top end lubricant that is added to the fuel.  Have not had any experience with the Diesel version, but I have used it on many engines that have only occasional use, and the small amount of oil does help the cylinders, both in use and in storage.  So perhaps it could be a fog type of application.  I do know that I used the Gas version on a 350CI Chevrolet in a 1 ton cube van for construction, and gained a +10% mileage per gallon.  I had already tuned it, rebuilt the carb, new tires, other maintenance items,(I'm a gearhead for a long time) and then added the Lubri-Gas which is where I netted that 10%.  I was introduced to it by my Dad, who was an SKP in the 90s.  He used it in his Class A for better fuel economy and for protection while sitting.  I bought the Class A later, 460 Ford, and no issues, so it didnt HURT it.

Marcel

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Here's what John Deere has to say about extended storage.

Preparing Engine for Long-Term Storage

IMPORTANT: Any time the engine is not used for over six months, the following recommendations for storing it and removing it from storage helps to minimize corrosion and deterioration.

IMPORTANT: Long-term storage is not advised when using BioDiesel. For storage longer than one year, use straight hydrocarbon fuel.

If BioDiesel must be used it is recommended the blend not exceed B7 and a high-quality fuel stabilizer be used. Storage should not exceed one year.

For more information see BioDiesel Fuel in the Fuels, Lubricants, and Coolants Section.

 

NOTE: The following storage preparations are used for long-term engine storage up to one year. After that, the engine should be started, warmed up, and retreated for an extended storage period.

  1. Change engine oil and replace filter. Used oil does not give adequate protection. Add 30 mL of rust preventive oil to the engine crankcase for every 1 L of engine oil, or 1 oz. of rust preventative oil per 1 qt. of engine oil. This rust preventive oil should be an SAE 10W oil with 1%-4% morpholine or equivalent vapor corrosion inhibitor, such as NOX RUST VCI-10 OIL from Daubert Chemical Company, Inc.

  2. Replace air cleaner.

  3. Draining and flushing of cooling system is not necessary if the engine is only stored for less than one year. However, for extended storage periods of a year or longer, it is recommended that the cooling system be drained, flushed, and refilled. Refill with appropriate coolant. See Diesel Engine Coolant (engine with wet sleeve cylinder liners) in the Fuels, Lubricants, and Coolants Section.

  4. Prepare a solution of diesel fuel and rust preventive oil in a temporary container, add 78 mL of rust preventive oil per 1 L of diesel fuel, 10 oz. of rust preventive oil per 1 gal. of diesel fuel.

  5. Remove existing lines and plugs as required. Run a temporary line from the temporary container to the engine fuel intake before the fuel filters, and another temporary line from the fuel return to the temporary container, so rust preventive oil solution is circulated through the injection system during cranking.

  6. IMPORTANT: Do not operate starter more than 30 seconds at a time. Wait at least 2 minutes for starter to cool before trying again.

    Crank the engine several revolutions with starter. Do not allow the engine to start. This allows rust preventive oil solution to circulate.

    See your authorized dealer for the proper procedure for your application.

  7. Remove temporary lines installed in Step 5 and replace any lines or plugs previously removed.

  8. Loosen (or remove) and store fan and alternator poly-vee belt.

  9. Remove and clean batteries. Store them in a cool, dry place and keep them fully charged.

  10. Disengage the clutch for any driveline.

  11. Clean the exterior of the engine with salt-free water and touch up any scratched or chipped painted surfaces with a good quality paint.

  12. Coat all exposed bare metal surfaces with grease or corrosion inhibitor if not feasible to paint.

  13. Seal all openings on engine with plastic bags and tape.

  14. Store the engine in a dry protected place. If engine must be stored outside, cover it with a waterproof canvas or other suitable protective material and use a strong waterproof tape.

 

 


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Sitting for periods of time you describe are going to lead to deterioration. Like mentioned in the John Deere list above, fuel and the system components, crankcase and whatever that lubricant touches are critical. But the ones that you are going to have to deal with in a big way are things like electrical problems, any part that is used to moving that doesn't. 

Some vehicles take a  hibernation in stride, a lot has to do with the immediate environment. Concrete floor, relative humidity, temperature variations all play a big part. That's why they store unused aircraft in the desert. Do as much on the list as possible now. See what happens.

Jeff Beyer temporarily retired from Trailer Transit
2000 Freightliner Argosy Cabover
2008 Work and Play 34FK
Homebase NW Indiana, no longer full time

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Mouse bait, lots of it..............  Not in the engine, but all around and in the vehicle.

KW T-680, POPEMOBILE
Newmar X-Aire, VATICAN
Lots of old motorcycles, Moto Guzzi Griso and Spyder F3 currently in the front row
Young enough to play in the dirt as a retired farmer.
contact me at rickeieio@yahoo.com

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Many thanks to all who took the time to respond. I greatly appreciate it. 

Based on your input, I drove the truck today and logged about 90 miles; some highway, some beboppin' around town.  

I refilled the tank and added more fuel stabilizer. Our rig was and will continue to be stored under cover on a cement floor in the desert-like region of eastern Oregon. Electronic mouse/rat repellers are in place and multiple cotton balls doused with peppermint oil (not extract) strategically placed near wiring and other potential trouble spots. Lead-acid batteries have been disconnected and are on a maintenance charge.

Once again, I thank you and value your insight.

Regards,

Mark

 

Mark & Sue---SKP#86611
'06 International 4400LoPro DT570 310hp 950ft-lbs.-Allison--3.70 gears
'05 36' Teton Liberty
'12 BMW F650 twin
 

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