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Air Leak


SuiteSuccess

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Overnighting in Staunton VA on our way to Gettysburg. Heard significant air leak and traced to the green air line in the pic. Took line out, trimmed end, cleaned and reinserted. Decreased leak significantly but not completely. The push in connector looks like something I should replace but how do you replace one in that firewall manifold?

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Go to the dealer and get the replacement parts for the push in connector. There is an "0-ring" and a brass collet that are replaceable. The O-ring is a greenish-blue color
Here are the Volvo part numbers:
1/4 O-ring 85108484 price $0.48 (each) come in a bag of 10
1/4 brass collet 85108476 price $ 2.86 (each)
3/8 O-ring 85108485 price & 0.56 (each) come in a bag of 10
3/8 brass collet 85108477 price $ 3.10 ( each)
1/2 O ring 85108486
1/2 brass collet 85108475
To replace the parts is pretty straight forward.
Please release all the air pressure in your system before attempting this repair!
1. Depress collar on fitting and remove line.
2. Remove brass collet. I use a pair of needle nose pliers.
3. Remove O-ring. Sometimes a bit of a challenge. I use a set of " dental picks" one straight and one with a 90" bend at the end. Use the picks to remove the O-ring. Most times it will be dry rotted and come about in prices. Make sure to remove all of the pieces. Insert new O-ring and be careful not to damage it.
4. Insert collet. Most times I will use the old one if it is still in usable shape. Most times the o-ring is the cause of the leak.
5. Trim off the end of the line before inserting into the "rebuilt" fitting. I like to do this when ever I have enough slack in the line. Sometimes it's not possible. When inserting the line into the fitting press the line in until it "bottoms" out in the fitting before you pull back on it to lock it in.
6. Pressure up your system and check for leaks. Sometimes a little wiggle on the line after it is pressurized will help it seat.
After this less costly repair attempt you may still have to repair/replace your pass-thru.
Good luck!

 

On Edit: These instructions were written with the "Newbie" in mind.... Lots of folks have already been down this path. Not trying to get anyone upset. This is how I do this type of repair. No need to buy the "gold plated" Volvo brass fittings if I can just repair it.

In most cases the "fitting" is fine it's just a worn out O-ring.

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Hard to tell from the photos, but it looks like a zip tie is pulling down on that green line. Perhaps snipping that tie will release the strain and let the line "relax" and stop leaking.

 

Try aligning the line so it's straight with the fitting. If the leak stops, secure it that way until you can do a proper repair/rebuild as outlined above. Finding parts on Sunday may be difficult. Oh, larger NAPA stores carry air line fittings, and perhaps the repair parts. Easier than finding a truck dealer.......

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Go to the dealer and get the replacement parts for the push in connector. There is an "0-ring" and a brass collet that are replaceable. The O-ring is a greenish-blue color

Here are the Volvo part numbers:

1/4 O-ring 85108484 price $0.48 (each) come in a bag of 10

1/4 brass collet 85108476 price $ 2.86 (each)

3/8 O-ring 85108485 price & 0.56 (each) come in a bag of 10

3/8 brass collet 85108477 price $ 3.10 ( each)

1/2 O ring 85108486

1/2 brass collet 85108475

To replace the parts is pretty straight forward.

Please release all the air pressure in your system before attempting this repair!

1. Depress collar on fitting and remove line.

2. Remove brass collet. I use a pair of needle nose pliers.

3. Remove O-ring. Sometimes a bit of a challenge. I use a set of " dental picks" one straight and one with a 90" bend at the end. Use the picks to remove the O-ring. Most times it will be dry rotted and come about in prices. Make sure to remove all of the pieces. Insert new O-ring and be careful not to damage it.

4. Insert collet. Most times I will use the old one if it is still in usable shape. Most times the o-ring is the cause of the leak.

5. Trim off the end of the line before inserting into the "rebuilt" fitting. I like to do this when ever I have enough slack in the line. Sometimes it's not possible. When inserting the line into the fitting press the line in until it "bottoms" out in the fitting before you pull back on it to lock it in.

6. Pressure up your system and check for leaks. Sometimes a little wiggle on the line after it is pressurized will help it seat.

After this less costly repair attempt you may still have to repair/replace your pass-thru.

Good luck!

 

On Edit: These instructions were written with the "Newbie" in mind.... Lots of folks have already been down this path. Not trying to get anyone upset. This is how I do this type of repair. No need to buy the "gold plated" Volvo brass fittings if I can just repair it.

In most cases the "fitting" is fine it's just a worn out O-ring.

Scott: You astound me! You are a wealth of knowledge. I have been chasing leaks (without success) since I bought the "Big Boy." I may make another attempt to fix these annoying, pesky leaks.

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I believe these type fitting are floating around in a lot of the different rigs regardless the make. I only have the Volvo part numbers for now. I hope to x-ref them and maybe get a better deal on the price. A demonstration at the rally would be easy to do and only take a few minutes.

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Suite,

When I was chasing air leaks, I found a couple minor leaks on that "green" line. I did like you, removed line, clipped the end, reinstalled. It helped, but then the line next to it started leaking. I did the same to it, but couldn't stop the leak, so cut some of the zip ties to relieve the tension and tried again. From then on, it seemed like I would get one fixed, only to have the one next to it start leaking! That was really 2 years ago. I know we shouldn't worry so much about oil, and air leaks, but they drive me crazy. At that time I don't think there was a repair kit like the one mentioned in previous post, so I replaced the manifold, dash valve, many, many push-pull connectors, and stopped most of my leaks. Still couldn't get them all. This summer, I purchased a "Whisperer", and found my engine brake valve was leaking, and after gallons, of soapy water, found that leak would never show with soapy spray, because it leaked back into the exhaust. Couldn't hide from the whisperer though. Now, after some stops, I never lose pressure, then sometimes I still do, but never below 60#. I also replaced my "pass through" wiring harness because of a small oil leak that was leaking on the starter motor.(big bucks) I still crank out the whisperer every once in a while, but mostly I just try to keep fuel in the tanks, oil in the crankcase, and air in the tanks, and don't worry about MPG, and SMALL oil, and air leaks. Still a happy camper! Good luck, Dick T

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Suite, The description Scott gave is spot on. I replaced all of my O rings in about an hour and that stopped the leaks. I did not have any dental tool but I used a large needle and a small screwdriver. I also used a pair of needle nose pliers to get the collets out. They remove easy. DON'T drop them. I dropped one and never found it. If I would not have had another one I would have been screwed.

I used the screwdriver to cut the O ring and then the needle to fish the pieces out. They were hard and would not seal. It is not a bad job if you have the parts to replace them and a little patience. Also they are not expensive parts. Just another demo to give at the rally.

 

Brad

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Evidently the part numbers posted by Mr.Seas are good throughout out the Gen 1 and 2. Just replaced 3 O-rings and 1 collet that were leaking.

Easy swap once the kick panels are out. I used a 3/8th open end wrench to press the collet in and then pulled the airline out. Then used a pair of side cutters to remove the collet.

 

We're holding air again!

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How much of an air leak do you guys feel is acceptable? I loose almost nothing from the primary system over a day or so, but loose 50 psi from the secondary overnight. Fixed the suspension valve and that helped a lot.

 

 

If that is all you are loosing then I don't think you have anything to worry about. My tanks will empty in a few short hours. Once the weather cools off some (post Rally) I will roll the truck in the shop and start hunting for my air leak problems.

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I was really surprised about my latest air leak fix. I hunt air leaks for a living and have never found a significant leak on my own truck, but will empty my tanks in a day. Last year at the rally I used Carl's (Suite Success) leak detector that showed I had leaks from the connections behind both seats. They weren't loud enough to hear unless you wiggled the connection and I never bothered to play with them. When I replaced the floor mat 2 weeks ago I pulled both seats out and I trimmed the ends of both airlines when I reconnected them and was surprised to see my suspension stayed aired up for almost an entire week. I guess it shows that even little leaks can add up.

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