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Death of Grand Canyon hiker


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What does Ottawa have to do with anything? 100+ degree temps, plus underprepared, plus extra activity equals trouble. No matter where you're from. From the article, the reports came in at 5:20 pm, pretty much the peak temperature time of day.

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Many people have a false sense of bravado concerning their physical well-being and mental stamina to stick to the training, and what they can endure. I wonder what type of physical training she performed while still at home.

That climb in high heat is vastly different than walking or running 2-3 miles a day on flat paved surfaces. 

Is it sad she died.

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3 hours ago, Darryl&Rita said:

What does Ottawa have to do with anything?

It has to do with what temperatures your body is conditioned for. If you live in Arizona year around you can handle more heat than if you live in Canada and only go to Arizona on vacation. Having lived most of my life in Minnesota, except for two years in Texas and the years we were RVing full time, I can tell you it does make a difference.

Linda

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3 hours ago, Darryl&Rita said:

What does Ottawa have to do with anything? 100+ degree temps, plus underprepared, plus extra activity equals trouble. No matter where you're from. From the article, the reports came in at 5:20 pm, pretty much the peak temperature time of day.

If you read the article you would know she came from Ottawa

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I read the article. If you did any research on the weather of the Ottawa valley, you'd know they regularly see summer conditions close to New Orleans. Temps approaching 100 and humidity in the 90 percent range. Conditioning could have prepared her for the workout she was going into, but the article didn't cover that aspect.

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2 hours ago, agesilaus said:

Why on earth would I look into the Ottawa weather? My interest was very transitory and quickly dissipated.

Perhaps she was replying to Sandsys' reply.  Regardless, living in cold climates has nothing to do with it.  It's common sense that hikers doing that strenuous hike need to prepare fully for it.  None of us know the details.  Perhaps she even had medical issues to begin with.

Here's an interesting article on deaths in the Canyon:

https://wereintherockies.com/how-many-people-have-died-in-the-grand-canyon/#:~:text=As of 2021%2C about 900,year in the Grand Canyon.

Edited by 2gypsies
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4 hours ago, Darryl&Rita said:

I read the article. If you did any research on the weather of the Ottawa valley, you'd know they regularly see summer conditions close to New Orleans. Temps approaching 100 and humidity in the 90 percent range. Conditioning could have prepared her for the workout she was going into, but the article didn't cover that aspect.

We get those hot and humid days, too. For a few days every year. Not enough of them for our bodies to acclimate, though. Not like winter which stays around for six months or so.

Linda

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Quote

Very interesting article, you will be surprised at the number one cause of death. Falls from the top are well down the list at 60 thru 2021. Deaths from heart attack and dehydration are higher in the list at 100.

As for acclimation to the climate, it seems obvious to me after seeing countless tourists from non-high altitude desert country  or low humidity, hot temp country starting on a hike with a tiny bottle of water. Maybe a quarter of a  liter instead of the multiple liter bottles they should be carrying. Add in the natural hazards of the canyon and you are asking for trouble.

So yes, I'd guess tourists just arrived from less extreme climates are more at risk.

As for that hike into the canyon bottom, not for us. We would not even consider it knowing our limitations. That trail down to the view point, yes that is on our todo list. My 25 year old, rock climbing, son could manage the hike to the river easily.

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15 hours ago, agesilaus said:

If you read the article

It is well worth the time to read if you have visited the canyon, plan to visit the canyon, or just to learn about the canyon. Thanks for posting it!

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Good series of comments about hiking the Grand Canyon... excepting the Ottawa Lady passing away, of course.

Back in 1998, and again in 2000, we hiked the canyon in late June (we were age 50'sh),   Went down the S. Kaibab Trail, stayed 3 nights at Phantom Ranch, then back up the Bright Angel Trail.   We researched things well in advance, and acknowledged up front (and dealt with) the danger of heat and elevation change.   One smart thing we did was to reserve an empty mule "feed sack" that we could fill with hiking items to go back up with the mule supply train... and then we could retrieve at the top.   Reducing weight even just a few pounds on the trip back back up made a difference.

Both times, we traveled from Michigan to Arizona leading a party of 10 hikers from our church... including our two teenage kids... and 20+ years later is remembered by all as an "experience of a lifetime!" 

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9 hours ago, agesilaus said:

As for that hike into the canyon bottom, not for us. We would not even consider it knowing our limitations. That trail down to the view point, yes that is on our todo list. 

The first 1.6 mi. are the steepest.  😉   https://www.advantagegrandcanyon.com/bright-angel-trail-elevation/#:~:text=When considering distance and elevation,summit on a Kilimanjaro hike.

We hiked to the river where we loaded into a raft for an awesome 9-night journey with more hiking. We were in our 60's.  We did a lot of pre-conditioning/steep hikes for the trip.

Edited by 2gypsies
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