Jump to content

Maintenance schedule


Recommended Posts

Okay folks, the New Year is coming.  My usual resolution is not to make any resolutions.  That way I can keep it all year and only break it at the end.  This year I am going to try something more productive - maintenance.

Does anyone have a maintenance schedule they think might be useful?  In my view the ideal maintenance schedule is one where you get things done before they fail or damage the item being maintained, but you aren't doing them so often that you are doing unnecessary work.  What works for you?

Jinx and Wayne

2006 Carriage Carri-Lite 36KSQ

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Jinx & Wayne said:

Does anyone have a maintenance schedule they think might be useful? 

That would depend on what the schedule is for. I assume that you are thinking of a schedule for RV's? Even then it will vary some depending on the type of RV. I never used a written schedule, even when full-time but now that we are back to part-time I just do all of it at the beginning of each season. 

sanitize the fresh water system

check the roof (caulking, seams, etc.)

check wheel bearings (pack as needed for towables)

check and tighten electrical connections (12V and 120V)

do a leak check of the propane system

test propane alarm

 

 

Good travelin !...............Kirk

Full-time 11+ years...... Now seasonal travelers.
Kirk & Pam's Great RV Adventure

            images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQqFswi_bvvojaMvanTWAI

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am full time and have a Class A DP. I service the engine once a year, oil and all filters and get the free inspection. I am told that includes getting all zerks on the chassis. About $550. I also have the genny serviced, oil and filter. About $250. Also once a year I get the Aqua Hot serviced. Clean the burner,new nozzle and filter. About $225. I usually do all of the above while I am at my winter location. I am usually rolling most of the summer and am not anywhere long enough to make an appointment for service. 

2015 Itasca Ellipse 42QD

2017 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon Hard Rock Edition

2021 Harley Street Glide Special 

Fulltimer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/28/2020 at 7:59 AM, Kirk W said:

Even then it will vary some depending on the type of RV.

I have a fiver, but because so many systems are interchangeable, anyone's input is welcome/

 

On 12/28/2020 at 7:59 AM, Kirk W said:

check and tighten electrical connections (12V and 120V)

What, more specifically, does this involve?

 

Wayne & Jinx
2017 F-350 diesel, dually
2006 Carriage Carri-Lite 36KSQ

Jinx and Wayne

2006 Carriage Carri-Lite 36KSQ

Link to comment
Share on other sites

30 minutes ago, Jinx & Wayne said:

What, more specifically, does this involve?

Remove and clean the battery connections. Open the 120V distribution panel and check that all connections are tight, the same at the auto transfer if you have one, and I also do a quick check of the circuit breaker connections. 

Good travelin !...............Kirk

Full-time 11+ years...... Now seasonal travelers.
Kirk & Pam's Great RV Adventure

            images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQqFswi_bvvojaMvanTWAI

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I had a 5er I would flush the hot water heater once a year and change the anode rod at the same time. I also greased the hubs on the axels once a year. 

2015 Itasca Ellipse 42QD

2017 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon Hard Rock Edition

2021 Harley Street Glide Special 

Fulltimer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Twotoes said:

greased the hubs on the axels once a year.

When we upgraded to electric over hydraulic disc brakes I installed axles with oil bath hubs.  Instead of greasing the hubs you just keep the oil level at the proper point.  The oil level is visible from outside and fill access is through a small rubber plug that is removed by hand.  They work very well.

 

Jinx and Wayne

2006 Carriage Carri-Lite 36KSQ

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Kirk W said:

Open the 120V distribution panel and check that all connections are tight, the same at the auto transfer if you have one, and I also do a quick check of the circuit breaker connections. 

This may be common sense, but do not open  the 120v panel until you have disconnected power at the pedestal. Even professional electricians prefer to work on a cold panel.

Now a short anecdotal reason for checking these things. A few months ago when the temps we still quite high, both a/c's were running pretty constant as well as fans, we smelled a burning plastic smell. I finally tracked it to the 120v panel. I removed the cover to look, took a pic and sent to my son who is an electrician. His response? Shut it all down and get the heck out of there until it can be fixed. I got a local electrician to look at it and he said the problem was that the screw holding the wire had come a little loose because it had been over tightened thus flattening the wire which allowed the wire to become loose as it heated and cooled. 

SignatureNewest.jpg.a1bc8322b0862056fd28e25d5b1458db.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

32 minutes ago, Chalkie said:

This may be common sense, but do not open  the 120v panel until you have disconnected power at the pedestal. Even professional electricians prefer to work on a cold panel.

Point well made! I probably should have said that. When I was taking my basic electrical education in the Navy, a chief petty officer told us something that I have never forgotten and live by. "There are old electricians and there are bold electricians. There are very few electricians who are both."

Edited by Kirk W
correct typo

Good travelin !...............Kirk

Full-time 11+ years...... Now seasonal travelers.
Kirk & Pam's Great RV Adventure

            images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQqFswi_bvvojaMvanTWAI

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Randyretired said:

The 2020 NEC requires the screws and bolts in a panel be torqued. 

The code does not apply to RVs unless it has recently changed. In addition, an RV is subjected to a lot of vibration due to travel that is not the case for a stick house. 

Good travelin !...............Kirk

Full-time 11+ years...... Now seasonal travelers.
Kirk & Pam's Great RV Adventure

            images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQqFswi_bvvojaMvanTWAI

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Randyretired said:

My point was there are torque values for these screws. 

So do you carry a torque screwdriver and use it regularly? I will quote the code.

Quote

N 110.14(D) Installation. Where a tightening torque is indicated as a numeric value on equipment or in installation instructions provided by the manufacturer, a calibrated torque tool shall be used to achieve the indicated torque value, unless the equipment manufacturer has provided installation instructions for an alternative method of achieving the required torque.

Torque screwdrivers are becoming more available and down in price, but I do not carry one and don't believe that I know any RVers who do.  It is important to make sure that connections are kept snugged down but not over tightened, even if you don't own the NEC approved tool. I can't remember ever seeing an RV tech use one. If I were in the business I might consider getting one now that you can find a reasonably good one for $50 or so. 

Good travelin !...............Kirk

Full-time 11+ years...... Now seasonal travelers.
Kirk & Pam's Great RV Adventure

            images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQqFswi_bvvojaMvanTWAI

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

35 minutes ago, Kirk W said:

So do you carry a torque screwdriver and use it regularly?

Yup, full set of torque wrenches, too. Part of daily use tools, from the past. Included in the collection is a set of torque tables for generic bolts and screws, by size, and manufacture specific tables for equipment I've collected. Been Code in Canada for a while.

I have been wrong before, I'll probably be wrong again. 

2000 Kenworth T 2000 w/N-14 and 10 speed Gen1 Autoshift, deck built by Star Fabrication
2006 smart fourtwo cdi cabriolet
2007 32.5' Fleetwood Quantum


Please e-mail us here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In my van it became important to regularly tighten the screws on my Fantastic fan vent. I found that out when I found a screw on the floor and had to hunt down its source.

In our class A, when we first bought it I went through all the manuals and made a chart of what things need to be done on what schedule. Times like on arriving or departing, weekly, months, annually. etc. That kept me from overlooking something as I set one day each week/month/year to tend to those things.

Linda

Blog: http://sandcastle.sandsys.org/

Former Rigs: Liesure Travel van, Winnebago View 24H, Winnebago Journey 34Y, Sportsmobile Sprinter conversion van

Link to comment
Share on other sites

51 minutes ago, Kirk W said:

So do you carry a torque screwdriver and use it regularly? I will quote the code.

Torque screwdrivers are becoming more available and down in price, but I do not carry one and don't believe that I know any RVers who do.  It is important to make sure that connections are kept snugged down but not over tightened, even if you don't own the NEC approved tool. I can't remember ever seeing an RV tech use one. If I were in the business I might consider getting one now that you can find a reasonably good one for $50 or so. 

This reminds me of the need to torque wheels on a vehicle.  Many years ago very few bothered with it but the problems mounted.  There is a safe way to do it and a maybe it will be all right way.  Now, nearly every firm does it the right way.  There is a liability involved here.  I prefer the right way, especially when my families safety is at risk.  I am sure it was added to the code because there have been problems. In fact nearly every NEC addition can be traced to a specific incident or incidents.

Randy

2001 Volvo VNL 42 Cummins ISX Autoshift

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Jinx & Wayne said:

"Honey, are you barbecuing out there?"

I didn't particularly need that visual. 🤣

I never knew there were torqueing screwdrivers in common use. I guess I know longer spend enough time wandering the tools aisles of Lowes, HD or Ace. However, I asked my son about it and he said that they have had them on all their trucks since the 2020 NEC was previewed.  

SignatureNewest.jpg.a1bc8322b0862056fd28e25d5b1458db.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Chalkie said:

I asked my son about it and he said that they have had them on all their trucks since the 2020 NEC was previewed.  

My quote was from the 2017 version of the NEC, so this isn't completely new. Where the catch comes in is that most RVs do not come with the instruction sheet that is supplied with their electrical distribution box where the torque settings are found. Some circuit breakers do have the settings on the breaker, somewhere if you know where to look. There are also many RVs that have electrical distribution boxes that were made specifically for the RV industry and so are not built to the NEC standard and may not have those torque settings available. I replaced the one in our travel trailer about 2 years ago. It is a combination, converter & distribution box from Progressive Dynamics and if the torques were in the instructions, I never saw them. WFCO and Power Max both make these combination boxes as well. 

In my opinion, most RV owners who do their own maintenance also have a pretty good amount of common sense and know not to overtighten these connections. The possibility of too tight is far less common than too loose, in my experience. If you own a torque screwdriver & torque wrench and know the proper settings, by all means use them as it would be better, but if you don't own either of them it is still a good practice to check and tighten any loose connections. 

Good travelin !...............Kirk

Full-time 11+ years...... Now seasonal travelers.
Kirk & Pam's Great RV Adventure

            images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQqFswi_bvvojaMvanTWAI

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/30/2020 at 6:18 PM, Randyretired said:

In fact nearly every NEC addition can be traced to a specific incident or incidents.

Yo Randy CORRECT AND HOW TRUE.  Back when I had to attend regular NEC Seminars and Workshops (the instructors, experts like a Mike Holt or Joe McPartland of EC&M) when explaining the reasons for NEC additions or updates were often due to A FIRE OR AN ELECTROCUTION  !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! and cited the specific incidents leading thereto....Each term the expert NEC board members meet to thoroughly review all accidents, determine the cause and make the appropriate changes and updates. Those guys are smartttttttttttt.

John T

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi John There is another change in the 2020 NEC that may complicate things for RVers who plug in there units at home.  Virtually all outside or garage outlets need GFCI.  The only exception I see are RV parks.  Our mini split will trip a GFCI and the manufacturer doesn't recommend GFCI.  In fact I don't see how one could install it even in their home.  With the new codes nearly all circuits will require ark fault or (and) ground fault circuitry. 

Randy

2001 Volvo VNL 42 Cummins ISX Autoshift

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Existing installations are grandfathered in, only if you do major renovations to the electrical system will you be required to meet current code. New installations will need to meet the code of the day.

I have been wrong before, I'll probably be wrong again. 

2000 Kenworth T 2000 w/N-14 and 10 speed Gen1 Autoshift, deck built by Star Fabrication
2006 smart fourtwo cdi cabriolet
2007 32.5' Fleetwood Quantum


Please e-mail us here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Randyretired said:

Virtually all outside or garage outlets need GFCI.  The only exception I see are RV parks.  Our mini split will trip a GFCI and the manufacturer doesn't recommend GFCI.  In fact I don't see how one could install it even in their home.  With the new codes nearly all circuits will require ark fault or (and) ground fault circuitry.

Hey there Randy, I'm not up to date on the latest NEC, but I agree outside and garage outlets for a long time required GFCI protection (except RV parks but the smaller 15/20's can) but of course, RVs may have their own GFCI protection in bathrooms, sinks and external outlets. Problem as you well know since it only takes 0.005 to 0.006 fault current amps to trip, nuisance tripping can be a problem in RV wiring schemes  grrrrrrrrrrrrrrr. As far as Im concerned with all the light flimsy flammable construction in a tinder box vibrating down the road RV, Arc Fault protection could can be a life saver....

A pleasure sparky chatting with you Randy, have a safe happy and blessed New year

John T 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, oldjohnt said:

Hey there Randy, I'm not up to date on the latest NEC, but I agree outside and garage outlets for a long time required GFCI protection (except RV parks but the smaller 15/20's can) but of course, RVs may have their own GFCI protection in bathrooms, sinks and external outlets. Problem as you well know since it only takes 0.005 to 0.006 fault current amps to trip, nuisance tripping can be a problem in RV wiring schemes  grrrrrrrrrrrrrrr. As far as Im concerned with all the light flimsy flammable construction in a tinder box vibrating down the road RV, Arc Fault protection could can be a life saver....

A pleasure sparky chatting with you Randy, have a safe happy and blessed New year

John T 

John,  the new code covers all outlets up to 250 volts.  Lighting and snow melt are the only exceptions.  Also by wording it as outlets it is not reserved for just receptacles but all electric outside.  We installed a 50 amp RV plug at our house and a couple of properties but in the future these will need to be GFCI. Which won't  work for us.  I am planning on wiring a new building we are planning and I have been studying the code so I can wire it.  The codes are ever changing and 2020 is keeping that tradition.

Edited by Randyretired
Clarity

Randy

2001 Volvo VNL 42 Cummins ISX Autoshift

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/1/2021 at 2:58 PM, Randyretired said:

The codes are ever changing and 2020 is keeping that tradition.

Yo Randy, I see things have NOT changed since I last practiced power distribution under the NEC lol but as we noted changes are often the result of a fire or electrical mishap with the intent to prevent it from happening again.............

John T Also longggggggggggg retired  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...