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kstills

Any Truck Camper Full Timers?

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I've been all over the place with potential RVs here and on other forums, but our first plan was a TC and now were back seriously considering this option. I know they are smaller, I know that storage will be an issue, what i want to know is your personal experience in one. 

The advantage to me is access to more remote areas. A good off road trailer with the right setup takes care of a lot of the negatives of storage associated with these rigs, and the costs, while higher per square foot than TT or 5Ws isn't a real concern. 

Thanks in advance for your thoughts, though since there isn't a section on these forums for TCs I'm not hopeful that many here are using them in this capacity. ;) 

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I don't think that they are very common, but I have known 2 couples who were full-time in truck campers and another who, though now back to travel for a few months a year, they were full-time in theres for more than 5 years. They chose the truck in order to tow a cargo trailer full of tools and such. I would think that with the current availability of slides for truck campers that there will be more full-time use of them. 

 

Edited by Kirk W

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I used to own a TC and enjoyed it quite a bit, although I was not full time in it.  When it was just me, I really liked the TC for its amenities and ease of use.  The biggest draw back, even when I was single in the TC, was storage.  Storage of personal items and storage of fresh and waste water.  Truck campers do not have the space to offer much of either.  My TC had a slide out and when it was deployed, it was very nice inside for me and even for me and my wife.  When my step son came along, the space did get pretty small pretty quickly.

I towed a cargo trailer behind the truck to haul the gear we needed; like chairs, a BBQ, ground mat, cooler (because the fridge was so small), generator and fuel, etc.   As a part time RVer at the time, it was a big hassle to have to load the cargo trailer every time we wanted to go camping and unload the cargo trailer every time we got home (I used the cargo trailer for other purposes when not using it with the TC).  As a full timer, this wouldn't be as much of an issue because the gear would just live in the cargo trailer all the time for travel. 

The biggest advantage of the TC was being able to get into remote locations because of its size and agility.  The biggest disadvantage was not being able to stay in those locations as long as I would have liked because of the lack of storage for fresh and waste water and properly sized batteries for long term use (although lithium batteries can mitigate this somewhat now).

As an aside, I ran into one issue with my TC at a park that perplexed me as well.  I wanted to head off for an outing one day while staying in this particular RV park.  I went to drop the TC so I could just take the PU.  A park employee told me I could not do that as there was a state law preventing the TC being on its own in the RV park.  I called BS on that and eventually got them to admit it was just a policy their park had, but it still prevented me from doing the outing I had planned that day.

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There are very few.  I've met one couple from England who landed in the US, bought a TC and had been on the road full time for eight years. 
Our experience has led us cross country and back for a few months - faster than mail can catch up.
The problem with towing is that you lose a lot of the flexibility of a truck camper.  Like when a guy in front of you at a gas station leaves his vehicle and runs across the street to order not-so-fast-food.  Or a dead end dirt road on a dark and cold night.
It happens.
Laundromats - always an adventure.  Prescription forwarding - another concern.  We tow a Jeep which is a blessing and a curse at the same time.  The TC is so much enjoyable to drive without the tow - but the toad permits a greater range of opportunities.
Try it for a while, there are other choices.

 

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"A park employee told me I could not do that as there was a state law preventing the TC being on its own in the RV park.  I called BS on that and eventually got them to admit it was just a policy their park had, but it still prevented me from doing the outing I had planned that day."

This was policy at a park we go to for many years and no one currently involved seemed to know why, so eventually they got rid of the rule.   They suspect it had to do with towing companies unable or unwilling to tow out a truck camper after being abandoned.  Now at that park many come in for fishing season towing a boat trailer and leave the TC in the campsite.  

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1 hour ago, Rich&Sylvia said:


Laundromats - always an adventure.  Prescription forwarding - another concern.  

Just wondering why the above would be difficult with a trailer?

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13 hours ago, Chad Heiser said:

I used to own a TC and enjoyed it quite a bit, although I was not full time in it.  When it was just me, I really liked the TC for its amenities and ease of use.  The biggest draw back, even when I was single in the TC, was storage.  Storage of personal items and storage of fresh and waste water.  Truck campers do not have the space to offer much of either.  My TC had a slide out and when it was deployed, it was very nice inside for me and even for me and my wife.  When my step son came along, the space did get pretty small pretty quickly.

I towed a cargo trailer behind the truck to haul the gear we needed; like chairs, a BBQ, ground mat, cooler (because the fridge was so small), generator and fuel, etc.   As a part time RVer at the time, it was a big hassle to have to load the cargo trailer every time we wanted to go camping and unload the cargo trailer every time we got home (I used the cargo trailer for other purposes when not using it with the TC).  As a full timer, this wouldn't be as much of an issue because the gear would just live in the cargo trailer all the time for travel. 

The biggest advantage of the TC was being able to get into remote locations because of its size and agility.  The biggest disadvantage was not being able to stay in those locations as long as I would have liked because of the lack of storage for fresh and waste water and properly sized batteries for long term use (although lithium batteries can mitigate this somewhat now).

As an aside, I ran into one issue with my TC at a park that perplexed me as well.  I wanted to head off for an outing one day while staying in this particular RV park.  I went to drop the TC so I could just take the PU.  A park employee told me I could not do that as there was a state law preventing the TC being on its own in the RV park.  I called BS on that and eventually got them to admit it was just a policy their park had, but it still prevented me from doing the outing I had planned that day.

Chad, 

The ones I'm looking at have about 65 gallons of fresh water. That's on par with a lot of the TTs that I've looked at. I will be using the trailer for a composting toilet (fair weather) and also to carry extra water and propane which should allow me to extend boondocking into the three week range. 

 

Agreed on the lack of storage, I watched a video of someone in one of the units I like, and they were crowing about the storage they had, when in fact they would have to turn a small box of cereal sideways in order to fit it into the 'pantry'. :( So for me, the trailer is a must have item to go along with the TC. 

Host has come out with three off grid packages using solar, lithium and inverters. The Extreme has ~600 watts solar, 480AH of lithium, and a 3000 watt inverter. I'm thinking you could probably run the AC with a setup like that. 

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17 hours ago, noteven said:

Take a scout around “Truck Camper Magazine” they have featured articles on full time TC people.

 

I'm all over truck camper magazine. 

In fact, I'm all over everywhere, lol. The more information I get, the happier I am. :) 

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5 hours ago, Rich&Sylvia said:

There are very few.  I've met one couple from England who landed in the US, bought a TC and had been on the road full time for eight years. 
Our experience has led us cross country and back for a few months - faster than mail can catch up.
The problem with towing is that you lose a lot of the flexibility of a truck camper.  Like when a guy in front of you at a gas station leaves his vehicle and runs across the street to order not-so-fast-food.  Or a dead end dirt road on a dark and cold night.
It happens.
Laundromats - always an adventure.  Prescription forwarding - another concern.  We tow a Jeep which is a blessing and a curse at the same time.  The TC is so much enjoyable to drive without the tow - but the toad permits a greater range of opportunities.
Try it for a while, there are other choices.

 

Dead end dirt roads on a dark and cold night are called campsites. :) 

Edited by kstills

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1 hour ago, kstills said:

Dead end dirt roads on a dark and cold night are called campsites. :) 

Love it!!!

Linda

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19 hours ago, Kirk W said:

I don't think that they are very common, but I have known 2 couples who were full-time in truck campers and another who, though now back to travel for a few months a year, they were full-time in theres for more than 5 years. They chose the truck in order to tow a cargo trailer full of tools and such. I would think that with the current availability of slides for truck campers that there will be more full-time use of them. 

 

I am definitely not giving up my tools. ;) 

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7 hours ago, kstills said:

I am definitely not giving up my tools. ;) 

You might want to start weighing your tools now to determine how many you will be able to take with you. Class Bs are not known for having a huge amount of towing capacity. The one you mentioned previously has less than 5000 pounds differential between the vehicle weight rating and the combined weight rating and that needs to cover the weight of the trailer itself in addition to the contents. When we moved into our first Class B we literally weighed everything we packed and made some changes in what we took because of their weight.

Linda

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9 hours ago, kstills said:

Host has come out with three off grid packages using solar, lithium and inverters. The Extreme has ~600 watts solar, 480AH of lithium, and a 3000 watt inverter. I'm thinking you could probably run the AC with a setup like that. 

That off grid package is very nice for a TC.  I have more than double that set up on my current 5th wheel and it allows me to basically be power independent as long as the sun is shining during the day.  As for running the air conditioner with that set up, it will probably be possible but the length of run time will still be limited.  The desired time to run the AC is usually early afternoon when it is hottest and there may not be enough solar harvest time left in the day to replenish the battery bank for overnight use after that.  It will depend on how you use the system and how much sun is available.  My TC use was over 15 years ago, so systems like that were nonexistent then.  I look at a serious boondocking rig as requiring solar, batteries, inverters, etc and it is nice to know they offer that from the factory.  I also want lots of water capacity for boondocking.  If you plan to haul additional water in the trailer you should be pretty good.  The composting toilet will also help.  Good luck with your plans.

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My wife and I full timed with 2 cats in our truck camper for 2 years.  Now our trips are likely to be 4 months or so.  Our truck camper is a Northstar Igloo which is 9.5' and has no slides.  We had a couple of large AGM batteries and 2 solar panels.  

A truck camper can be ideal for those who want to do a lot of travel.  Breaking down camp consisted of making sure cabinets were closed and there was nothing left on the kitchen counter or the dinette table top.  Sometimes I needed leveling blocks which would add an additional step of moving a few feet and picking up the blocks.  A truck camper allows parking in most parking spots designed for cars.  That is great for day trips in national parks, etc.  It means we could stop anywhere for lunch, take a nap, and avoid using outhouses.  

Storage was pretty good.  We had a separate pantry closet, an entry wardrobe closet.  In the bed area each of us had a small wardrobe closet and both a bed high footlocker and another equivalent overhead cabinet.  Additional storage was the space between the truck body and camper with 2 access doors.  That was great for extra shoes, dirty laundry, tools, etc.  In addition there was a 2x2x6 foot storage area over the dinette.  We had a crew cab truck and the back seat area was used for storage of additional bulky items:  my archery target, luggage, extra bedding, travel platforms for the cats, etc.  Amenities include a TV (never turned on), a microwave (rarely used), a 4 person dinette, 3 burner stove, double sink, a 4 cu ft compressor refrigerator/freezer,  restroom/wet bath, full queen sized foam mattress.

Downsides are limited floor space, no recliner chairs and the pros and cons of always traveling with the RV. 

An TC is ideal for off grid camping.  We rarely used hook ups and often stayed in BLM, forest service or NP campgrounds.  We did some "stealth" camping where we parked and stayed in residential areas.  Some people view this as an illegal activity.  Typically it is not or the laws are unclear.  We stealth camped next to a golf course in a very exclusive area after checking with the police to be sure it was legal.  Even so neighbors don't want a gypsy camp and keeping a low profile is the best course of action.

Anyway I will be happy to answer any questions about full time TC camping.    

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6 hours ago, JimK said:

 

Anyway I will be happy to answer any questions about full time TC camping.    

Oh boy, you may come to regret those words. :) 

First off, what would you personally have done differently? 

What are you personal pros and cons of the lifestyle? 

Did you have any other experience with RV living that directed you to TCs? 

Those are the starter questions, I have more. :) 

 

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14 hours ago, Chad Heiser said:

That off grid package is very nice for a TC.  I have more than double that set up on my current 5th wheel and it allows me to basically be power independent as long as the sun is shining during the day.  As for running the air conditioner with that set up, it will probably be possible but the length of run time will still be limited.  The desired time to run the AC is usually early afternoon when it is hottest and there may not be enough solar harvest time left in the day to replenish the battery bank for overnight use after that.  It will depend on how you use the system and how much sun is available.  My TC use was over 15 years ago, so systems like that were nonexistent then.  I look at a serious boondocking rig as requiring solar, batteries, inverters, etc and it is nice to know they offer that from the factory.  I also want lots of water capacity for boondocking.  If you plan to haul additional water in the trailer you should be pretty good.  The composting toilet will also help.  Good luck with your plans.

The TX is going to be quite a bit smaller than the 5th wheel, so I'm hoping that it's enough to keep things cool on the occasions we need it without draining the batteries. I expect to be chasing the weather quite a bit of the time, hopefully not spending a great deal of time in hot and humid conditions. 

Plus, they have the extreme plus package with an additional 2 panels and two batteries, but I think you need a large dog to strap those onto. 

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1 hour ago, kstills said:

Oh boy, you may come to regret those words. :) 

First off, what would you personally have done differently? 

What are you personal pros and cons of the lifestyle? 

Did you have any other experience with RV living that directed you to TCs? 

Those are the starter questions, I have more. :) 

 

There is very little I would have done differently.  I got lucky with the initial purchase.  By luck I visited a truck camper expert, Bill Penney, at East End Campers, now Truck Camper Warehouse.  He sold me on  a relatively uncommon brand that he believed in as well built - Northstar.  I also bought a relatively new unit that was on consignment.  That also worked out well because the seller agreed to fix anything that was not like new and Bill did the inspection and made the couple of minor repairs he could find.  The Northstar Igloo also came with some features I would not want to do without.  First a full sized Queen bed.  We did immediately replace the mattress.  Second, there are no slides.  That greatly reduces weight, allows stealth mode and allows total use of the camper without extending slides.  Next it came with a wet bath.  We use a squeegee to dry down the walls after a shower and that works remarkably well and is quick.  That is a minor nuisance to gain that huge amount of space for storage and other use.  Finally it came with a cassette toilet.  I can empty it virtually anywhere including outhouses, a flush toilet if no one else is around to be bothered with the odor, a dump station and even once in an emergency, I dug a hole.  The only issue was a huge oversized compressor refrigerator.  I replaced that with a more reasonable sized Nova Kool and added a second solar panel and 2 x 150 AH AGM batteries.  My other mods have been pretty simple such as wardrobe dividers/shelves and a half dozen 12v charging ports.  I also put in a piece of indoor/outdoor carpeting which turned out to be a better choice than I imagined.  

The TC lifestyle is a  significant notch up from most conversion vans in terms of comfort and space but otherwise is similar.  It is a really good choice for those who are going to travel as opposed to those who spend long times in one area and are more concerned about TV, recliners, floor space and hook ups.  I have no set up/breakdown time except for the possible need to use leveling blocks or those very rare occasions when I need to unplug from 110v service. 

The pros and cons of a TC is the necessity of going everywhere with the full rig.   A quick story of my visits to Yellowstone might highlight this attribute.  Yellowstone campgrounds are always crowded but with a TC I can fit in virtually any campsite.  When I leave the campground during the day, I need to travel with my 13000# rig.  So when I drive over to the Lamar Valley it takes me longer to get there.  I can also avoid using some of the world's worst outhouses.  I can set up a lawn chair watching the wildlife, eat a hot meal and then take an afternoon nap.  Most of the visitors in their toads are worn out and leave by late afternoon.  Instead I have my dinner there and return usually well after sunset.  I see more wildlife in that last hour of daylight than I saw all during the daylight hours.

I hope that helps.     

 

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29 minutes ago, JimK said:

There is very little I would have done differently.  I got lucky with the initial purchase.  By luck I visited a truck camper expert, Bill Penney, at East End Campers, now Truck Camper Warehouse.  He sold me on  a relatively uncommon brand that he believed in as well built - Northstar.  I also bought a relatively new unit that was on consignment.  That also worked out well because the seller agreed to fix anything that was not like new and Bill did the inspection and made the couple of minor repairs he could find.  The Northstar Igloo also came with some features I would not want to do without.  First a full sized Queen bed.  We did immediately replace the mattress.  Second, there are no slides.  That greatly reduces weight, allows stealth mode and allows total use of the camper without extending slides.  Next it came with a wet bath.  We use a squeegee to dry down the walls after a shower and that works remarkably well and is quick.  That is a minor nuisance to gain that huge amount of space for storage and other use.  Finally it came with a cassette toilet.  I can empty it virtually anywhere including outhouses, a flush toilet if no one else is around to be bothered with the odor, a dump station and even once in an emergency, I dug a hole.  The only issue was a huge oversized compressor refrigerator.  I replaced that with a more reasonable sized Nova Kool and added a second solar panel and 2 x 150 AH AGM batteries.  My other mods have been pretty simple such as wardrobe dividers/shelves and a half dozen 12v charging ports.  I also put in a piece of indoor/outdoor carpeting which turned out to be a better choice than I imagined.  

The TC lifestyle is a  significant notch up from most conversion vans in terms of comfort and space but otherwise is similar.  It is a really good choice for those who are going to travel as opposed to those who spend long times in one area and are more concerned about TV, recliners, floor space and hook ups.  I have no set up/breakdown time except for the possible need to use leveling blocks or those very rare occasions when I need to unplug from 110v service. 

The pros and cons of a TC is the necessity of going everywhere with the full rig.   A quick story of my visits to Yellowstone might highlight this attribute.  Yellowstone campgrounds are always crowded but with a TC I can fit in virtually any campsite.  When I leave the campground during the day, I need to travel with my 13000# rig.  So when I drive over to the Lamar Valley it takes me longer to get there.  I can also avoid using some of the world's worst outhouses.  I can set up a lawn chair watching the wildlife, eat a hot meal and then take an afternoon nap.  Most of the visitors in their toads are worn out and leave by late afternoon.  Instead I have my dinner there and return usually well after sunset.  I see more wildlife in that last hour of daylight than I saw all during the daylight hours.

I hope that helps.     

 

Small world. 

IF it's the Truck Camper Warehouse in NH, we're headed there next weekend. 

You never feel cramped in the Igloo? I'm looking more at the double slide Host models because of the lack of room in the slide less models. Unfortunately, Host integrates the black tank and toilet, so I can't get them to replace both with a composting unit. One of the things going into the trailer. With the smaller fridge you don't run into issues running out of food boondocking? I'm aiming for being out 3 weeks at a time, and part of that will be buying dried food in bulk, lol. 

How much mobility do you have going off the beaten path? I'm really interested in getting further out than the motorhomes and vans, but size and weight will determine the distance that I'm able to travel, I'll bet. 4WD will help, but from what I've read anything short of a pop up is a challenge getting into the back country unless the roads are pretty good. 

Regarding going everywhere with the full rig, you don't drop your rig? Seems that some folks think it's a piece of cake, while others avoid it like the plague. Personally, I'd like a thicker jack system, especially for the larger units. Once these things are on the ground they look pretty 'spindly' and can be moved around a lot unless they are at the bottom range of the jacks. 

 

And yes, it helps tremendously.  

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6 minutes ago, kstills said:

I'm aiming for being out 3 weeks at a time, and part of that will be buying dried food in bulk, lol. 

We like Mountain House brand freeze-dried food because they cook the meals first then freeze-dry them so they taste great! We bought a lot of entrees and desserts (some from Backpackers Pantry) then we would make one entree and one dessert to feed the two of us. When it's just me, I eat the whole entree without a desert. It doesn't take a LOT of water to make these. I once brought a double batch of freeze-dried blueberry cheesecake to a potluck and it was very popular.

Linda

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39 minutes ago, sandsys said:

We like Mountain House brand freeze-dried food because they cook the meals first then freeze-dry them so they taste great! We bought a lot of entrees and desserts (some from Backpackers Pantry) then we would make one entree and one dessert to feed the two of us. When it's just me, I eat the whole entree without a desert. It doesn't take a LOT of water to make these. I once brought a double batch of freeze-dried blueberry cheesecake to a potluck and it was very popular.

Linda

That's good to hear, as I haven't tried any of these yet and considering they are pretty expensive. Weight will always be an issue, so anything I can do to reduce it is appreciated. 

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17 minutes ago, kstills said:

Small world. 

IF it's the Truck Camper Warehouse in NH, we're headed there next weekend. 

You never feel cramped in the Igloo? I'm looking more at the double slide Host models because of the lack of room in the slide less models. Unfortunately, Host integrates the black tank and toilet, so I can't get them to replace both with a composting unit. One of the things going into the trailer. With the smaller fridge you don't run into issues running out of food boondocking? I'm aiming for being out 3 weeks at a time, and part of that will be buying dried food in bulk, lol. 

How much mobility do you have going off the beaten path? I'm really interested in getting further out than the motorhomes and vans, but size and weight will determine the distance that I'm able to travel, I'll bet. 4WD will help, but from what I've read anything short of a pop up is a challenge getting into the back country unless the roads are pretty good. 

Regarding going everywhere with the full rig, you don't drop your rig? Seems that some folks think it's a piece of cake, while others avoid it like the plague. Personally, I'd like a thicker jack system, especially for the larger units. Once these things are on the ground they look pretty 'spindly' and can be moved around a lot unless they are at the bottom range of the jacks. 

 

And yes, it helps tremendously.  

Again, my preference is definitely to go without slides.  I want to be able to have full use of the TC for day use and for stealth camping.  I also do not want the size or weight.  Forget about any sort of remote areas off the beaten path with a heavy, 2 slide camper and a trailer.  I would not want to take a rig like that anywhere off road unless the off road driving was a very good gravel road.  Also carefully consider what you are gaining with slides.  Many times it is just useless floor space.  We don't dance in the camper.  No bowling either.  Again these are lifestyle choices you need to make.  I want to be able to stop for the night on a residential street.  I rarely do that any old place but it comes up frequently when visiting friends and relatives.  I also wanted to keep the weight down to get by without a dualie.  You will definitely need that for a 2 slide Host.  When buying pay careful attention to the weight.  Make sure you know the wet weight and also that all of the accessories you are buying are included in the total weight.  Then for 2 people and extended trips, add 2000# to get a more accurate weight.

Regarding the size of the refrigerator, mine is 4 cu ft.  I have no issue for keeping meat.  My freezer is typically packed with many pounds of cooked hamburger, sausage, and chicken pieces which is the basis for most meals and with planning will last up to about a month for the 2 of us.  My wife does like a lot of fresh vegetables which can be an issue for fridge space.  When we stock up on those items I also have a 1 cu ft collapsible insulated chest which fits under the dinette table.  By the time that runs out those "fresh" vegetables are way past being fresh.   I also find we eat differently while traveling.  We eat things like tomato sauce with pasta, burritos, stir fry, sausage and peppers and other meals that can be cooked within 15 minutes.  When the fresh meat gets low, I also have a pile of tasty recipes for canned chicken, tuna ,etc. 

I have never tried to take the camper off during a trip.  Mine fits really tightly and is difficult to load. BTW be sure to check this.  The issue is not the space between the wheel wells.  I have 2" on both sides there.  The issue is the opening on the tailgate.  With the extension for the bath that leaves me way less than 1" on that side of the camper.  Secondly I make use of the storage area between the camper and the truck body.  We have access doors on both sides and we fill those areas:  extra boots, shoes, dirty laundry, toilet paper, paper towels, 100' HD extension cord which is rarely used but can be essential, space heater, tools.  Now that we are no longer full timers some of the storage has opened up.  However we still go for several months at a time and often from plenty warm to down below freezing at night and maybe 40s during the day.  I plan on 30 days between Laundromat visits.  I would need to move a lot of stuff to take the camper off and leave it.  I sure would not want to stay in it while on the jacks.  There is way too much movement and the camper will not lower to the ground.  Also remember there is a lot of weight on those jacks.  Even if you put down some wooden blocks you need to be sure you are on a very firm, dry area.

I certainly cannot tell you what camper to get.  I can only advise that you seriously consider your lifestyle and the type of trips you want to take.  Even though I live in NY almost all of my camping is in the Western US.  Choices are much different out West and incidentally TCs are more popular because of those choices.  In my area the few TCs are mainly for fishermen to camp on the beaches.    

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Let me add a comment or two about food when stores are not available.  Again I can go up to a month living primarily off of the refrigerator and meat that I cook and then freeze.  There are a lot of items that can extend trips when shopping is not available.  Next month I may start my long postponed trip.  I will likely spend a month in Death Valley.  There is no grocery store or even overpriced miniMart.  I always travel with plenty of rice,  pasta and dried potatoes.  They keep forever and are light weight.  When the fresh or frozen meats run low, I switch to canned.  Canned chicken and some canned red curry sauce from TJs can make a great meal especially with some stir fried asparagus or broccoli.  Both of those keep quite well.  I even developed a taste for spam when I stayed in Hawaii.  Fried spam, garlic, Thai garlic sauce, canned pineapple, soy sauce, and dried or fresh ginger can make a great stir fry with rice.  Canned clams, a squirt of lemon juice, lots of garlic, parmesan and pasta also make a quick tasty meal.  Those are just 3 examples of my many quick go to meals.  I guarantee you will be able to come up with lots of options that are better than Mountain House and cost a lot less.

Edited by JimK

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Currently I carry a Cirrus 820 on an 8' Aluma flatbed. I have some storage boxes under the "wings" In the space ahead of the camper to the headache rack I carry the spare, Honda generator, tire chains, 2 x spare 20lbs propane, 2 x water jugs.  I tow an enclosed garage trailer with1 to 4  motorsickle(s) & garage stuff. 

We had pop up trailer, truck campers x 5, travel trailer, 40 ft toyhauler & Kenworth, and latest is won ton and Cirrus 820. 

5 to 6 months in the Cirrus rig is fine. 

I kept my travel trailer to use at summer home base on family farm, but I "go camping" in the TC rig in the summer. 

If you use a "fleetside" pickup with a standard box, the rig looks nicer to people you don't even know. But a flatbed with stowage is way more practical. 

If you can pare down your "stuff" to what fits a truck and camper ya hoo! nothing to tow...

But my camper is 1. shelter, and 2. an appliance for moving motorcycles to new riding opportunities. It is not my world. 

 

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RVers Online University

campgroundviews.com

Our program provides accurate individual wheel weights for your RV, toad, and tow vehicle, and will help you trim the pounds if you need to.

DFW RV Roof

RVAir The cleanest air in RVing!

Rv Share

Dish For My RV.

Find out more or sign up for Escapees RV'ers Bootcamp.

Advertise your product or service here.

The Rvers- Now Streaming

AGS Now Hiring

RV Pet Safety

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