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2 x 30amp male to 50amp dog bone

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I just ordered a dog bone RV Power Cord Adapter Y Split 2x30 Amp Male to 50 Amp Female Connector.  Thinking it would give me more power options and maybe get 45-50amps of power at a box that does not have a 50amp outlet. I carry a 30-15,20amp adapter also. Just wondering  if anyone carries this and their experience with it.

Thanks

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I have One Ryan, I bought it a couple of years ago. Unfortunately I haven’t put it to the test, I bought it for that “special” occasion.  LOL. There’s a place we go in Iowa where they only have 30 AMP service but they have two 30 AMP receptacles in the same box. We haven’t been back there since so I haven’t had the chance to try it out. Like you I’m sure, most places we go we have 50 AMP, 30 AMP, 20 AMP option. 
 

Dan

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Dan, if I use it before you, I will let you know how it worked. Just another tool in the arsenal that gives me more options. 

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Ryno, HERES THE DEAL: If you need that adapter so you end up with TWO legs of 120 VAC, the unit pictured MAY OR MAY NOT provide you with two separate (180 degrees out of phase) legs of 120 Volt and 30 amps. IT DEPENDS ON HOW THE PEDESTAL IS CONFIGURED. Even though sure the best way (how I would design it) would be to have two 120 Volt receptacles in an RV pedestal on available and opposite legs, I cant guarantees that's whats there !!!!!!!!!!!!!

Absent a wiring diagram I'm going to assume the hot on one 30 amp plug is connected to L1 on the 50 amp Receptacle and the hot on the other 30 amp plug is connected to L2 on the 50 amp receptacle. Sort of a well duh but FWIW 

1) Ifffffffffff the two 30 amp receptacles you plug to are part of a 120/240 Volt Single Phase Three Wire supply and iffffffffffffffffff both are on separate legs (One on L1 other on L2, 180 out of phase) THEN YOU END UP WITH TWO LEGS OF 120 AT 30 AMPS CAPACITY, and that could run one typical 13,500 BTU 120 Volt Rooftop RV AC on one leg and another AC on another leg in a 50 Amp RV

2) HOWEVER if the two 30 amp receptacles you plug to are BOTH on the same leg (NO L1 & L2) inside the power pedestal then you ONLY have one leg of 120 VAC feeding into your 50 amp (designed for two 180 out of phase legs of 120) coach.

HOW TO TELL On the RV pedestal if you place a volt meter on the hot leg of one 30 amp receptacle and the other lead on the hot leg of the other 30 amp receptacle IF IT READS 240 YOU HAVE TWO LEGS,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, IF IT READS ZERO ONLY ONE 

Another dogbone adapter Ive seen is where one male plug is a 30 amp and the other male plug is a 15 amp with a 50 amp female receptacle. Same purpose, if the 30 and 30 receptacles are on opposite legs (L1 & L2)  (AND THAT'S HOW I WOULD WIRE AN RV PEDESTAL WITH A 50 A, 30 A, AND 15 A Receptacles) that dogbone if wired as I assume, would yield two legs of 120 at 30 amps.

Soooooooooooooooo it depends on how the RV Power Pedestal is configured to determine what that dogbone adapter can supply. As long as the pedestal has two 120 volt receptacles (how Id wire and whats Id hope and expect) on two separate 180 out of phase 120 volt L1 & L2 legs IT WILL WORK TO SUPPLY YOU WITH TWO LEGS OF 120 AT 30 AMPS CAPACITY.

NOTE that adapter isn't going to give you what you asked for  "maybe get 45-50amps of power at a box that does not have a 50amp outlet"   if theres no 50 amp capacity in the pedestal. It "might" give you two legs of 120 BUT THE DOGBONE CANT CREATE AMPACITY THAT ISNT THERE TO BEGIN WITH !!!!!!!!!!!!!

Im NOT saying it cant work, Im ONLY saying it doesn't create energy or ampacity.

NOTE a possible problem may be overloading a common Neutral if you use two legs of 120 that are in phase, since the Neutral current would add VERSUS cancel each other out if the two legs were 180 out of phase.

Nuff said, hope this helps you understand the uses and limitations of what that adapter can do as ITS SUBJECT TO HOW THE POWER PEDESTAL WAS WIRED. There's a good chance (100% had I designed it and how a park SHOULD) it can give you two legs of 120 and 30 amps...........

John T

 

Edited by oldjohnt

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We volunteered at a National Wildlife Refuge that for some reason had installed a pair of 30 amp outlets at each site but no 50 amp outlet.  We just lived with the 30 amps as we were only there for 3 months. But another volunteer couple that came back year after year had one of these adapters and used it successfully.  It gave them a "total" of 60 amps rather than the 100 amps they'd have had with the 50 amp RV outlet, but they were able to run pretty much anything they wanted, while we were having to do a bit of load management. 

That being said, it is the only place that we've ever seen with two, 30 amp outlets at a site. An odd configuration, indeed. 

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1 hour ago, oldjohnt said:

Ryno, HERES THE DEAL: If you need that adapter so you end up with TWO legs of 120 VAC, the unit pictured MAY OR MAY NOT provide you with two separate (180 degrees out of phase) legs of 120 Volt and 30 amps. IT DEPENDS ON HOW THE PEDESTAL IS CONFIGURED. Even though sure the best way (how I would design it) would be to have two 120 Volt receptacles in an RV pedestal on available and opposite legs, I cant guarantees that's whats there !!!!!!!!!!!!!

Absent a wiring diagram I'm going to assume the hot on one 30 amp plug is connected to L1 on the 50 amp Receptacle and the hot on the other 30 amp plug is connected to L2 on the 50 amp receptacle. Sort of a well duh but FWIW 

1) Ifffffffffff the two 30 amp receptacles you plug to are part of a 120/240 Volt Single Phase Three Wire supply and iffffffffffffffffff both are on separate legs (One on L1 other on L2, 180 out of phase) THEN YOU END UP WITH TWO LEGS OF 120 AT 30 AMPS CAPACITY, and that could run one typical 13,500 BTU 120 Volt Rooftop RV AC on one leg and another AC on another leg in a 50 Amp RV

2) HOWEVER if the two 30 amp receptacles you plug to are BOTH on the same leg (NO L1 & L2) inside the power pedestal then you ONLY have one leg of 120 VAC feeding into your 50 amp (designed for two 180 out of phase legs of 120) coach.

HOW TO TELL On the RV pedestal if you place a volt meter on the hot leg of one 30 amp receptacle and the other lead on the hot leg of the other 30 amp receptacle IF IT READS 240 YOU HAVE TWO LEGS,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, IF IT READS ZERO ONLY ONE 

Another dogbone adapter Ive seen is where one male plug is a 30 amp and the other male plug is a 15 amp with a 50 amp female receptacle. Same purpose, if the 30 and 30 receptacles are on opposite legs (L1 & L2)  (AND THAT'S HOW I WOULD WIRE AN RV PEDESTAL WITH A 50 A, 30 A, AND 15 A Receptacles) that dogbone if wired as I assume, would yield two legs of 120 at 30 amps.

Soooooooooooooooo it depends on how the RV Power Pedestal is configured to determine what that dogbone adapter can supply. As long as the pedestal has two 120 volt receptacles (how Id wire and whats Id hope and expect) on two separate 180 out of phase 120 volt L1 & L2 legs IT WILL WORK TO SUPPLY YOU WITH TWO LEGS OF 120 AT 30 AMPS CAPACITY.

NOTE that adapter isn't going to give you what you asked for  "maybe get 45-50amps of power at a box that does not have a 50amp outlet"   if theres no 50 amp capacity in the pedestal. It "might" give you two legs of 120 BUT THE DOGBONE CANT CREATE AMPACITY THAT ISNT THERE TO BEGIN WITH !!!!!!!!!!!!!

Im NOT saying it cant work, Im ONLY saying it doesn't create energy or ampacity.

NOTE a possible problem may be overloading a common Neutral if you use two legs of 120 that are in phase, since the Neutral current would add VERSUS cancel each other out if the two legs were 180 out of phase.

Nuff said, hope this helps you understand the uses and limitations of what that adapter can do as ITS SUBJECT TO HOW THE POWER PEDESTAL WAS WIRED. There's a good chance (100% had I designed it and how a park SHOULD) it can give you two legs of 120 and 30 amps...........

John T

 

Important info above. I had to do this in Cedar Rapids, Iowa a couple years ago to allow me to use my Mini Split. I did check to be sure I had the 110 on each side before plugging in. All was well for my 3 month stay. I opted for a box built by Spacecraft for me. The cost was about the same, but I will be able to repair individual parts if I need. 

 

Rod

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If you plug into a 30 amp outlet and a 15/20 amp GFCI outlet as found on most newer park boxes, it will not work. The GFCI will trip due to the neutral/hot imbalance...

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38 minutes ago, lappir said:

I did check to be sure I had the 110 on each side before plugging in.

Wise move lappir.......While most RV parks are wired properly, in which case a Pedestal with multiple receptacles was equipped with true 120/240 Volt Single Phase Three Wire having two legs of 120 each 180 out of phase (so the dogbone in question would work as intended) UNFORTUNATELY in my 49 years of RVing I ran across many that were NOT grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr... I've also seen a few wired using a 208 Y 120 Volt Three Phase Four Wire configuration whereby there would be 208 Line to Line, NOT 240 

While 120 Line to Neutral on BOTH receptacles in a multi outlet pedestal is correct, whats most telling is there should be (if correct) 240 Volts from the hot on one 15/30 receptacle to the hot on another 15/30 (for the dogbone to work as intended) NOT ZERO VOLTS !!!!!!!!!!!! 

While Ive seen several dogbones with one 30 and and one 15 amp male plug adapted to a 50 Amp Female Receptacle,  the one above with two 30's I haven't seen. Similar while I've seen RV Park Power Pedestals with one 15, one 30, and a 50 amp receptacles, I don't recall a pedestal with TWO 30 amp receptacles........... If I were the design engineer, in a pedestal with a true 50 plus a  30 and a 15 amp receptacle, I would have the 15 and 30 on separate legs ....................

Fun sparky chatting with yall

John T

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We used one of those a few times when we were on the road. It doesn't supply as much as a typical 50A outlet but it did serve us pretty well. While it is best if each of the two 30A outlets that you connect to are on opposite legs of the supply, it isn't critical. If you connect to two 30A outlets that are on the same leg, all that does is to put everything on the same phase for power but it also means that your neutral line in your RV power cord is now carrying 100% of the current, which is not usually the case. For that reason you need to keep a close eye on the temperatures of your power cord, but that is a good habit to have anyway.

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IF the pedestal is not wired with both L1 and L2 (240 volts) your load management system (if it is like mine) will think you have only 30 amps available and will shed loads to maintain less than 30 amps.  At least that is how mine works.

Lenp

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7 hours ago, Dutch_12078 said:

If you plug into a 30 amp outlet and a 15/20 amp GFCI outlet as found on most newer park boxes, it will not work. The GFCI will trip due to the neutral/hot imbalance...

Yes I read about that as a GFI will trip.

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10 hours ago, oldjohnt said:

Ryno, HERES THE DEAL: If you need that adapter so you end up with TWO legs of 120 VAC, the unit pictured MAY OR MAY NOT provide you with two separate (180 degrees out of phase) legs of 120 Volt and 30 amps. IT DEPENDS ON HOW THE PEDESTAL IS CONFIGURED. Even though sure the best way (how I would design it) would be to have two 120 Volt receptacles in an RV pedestal on available and opposite legs, I cant guarantees that's whats there !!!!!!!!!!!!!

Absent a wiring diagram I'm going to assume the hot on one 30 amp plug is connected to L1 on the 50 amp Receptacle and the hot on the other 30 amp plug is connected to L2 on the 50 amp receptacle. Sort of a well duh but FWIW 

1) Ifffffffffff the two 30 amp receptacles you plug to are part of a 120/240 Volt Single Phase Three Wire supply and iffffffffffffffffff both are on separate legs (One on L1 other on L2, 180 out of phase) THEN YOU END UP WITH TWO LEGS OF 120 AT 30 AMPS CAPACITY, and that could run one typical 13,500 BTU 120 Volt Rooftop RV AC on one leg and another AC on another leg in a 50 Amp RV

2) HOWEVER if the two 30 amp receptacles you plug to are BOTH on the same leg (NO L1 & L2) inside the power pedestal then you ONLY have one leg of 120 VAC feeding into your 50 amp (designed for two 180 out of phase legs of 120) coach.

HOW TO TELL On the RV pedestal if you place a volt meter on the hot leg of one 30 amp receptacle and the other lead on the hot leg of the other 30 amp receptacle IF IT READS 240 YOU HAVE TWO LEGS,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, IF IT READS ZERO ONLY ONE 

Another dogbone adapter Ive seen is where one male plug is a 30 amp and the other male plug is a 15 amp with a 50 amp female receptacle. Same purpose, if the 30 and 30 receptacles are on opposite legs (L1 & L2)  (AND THAT'S HOW I WOULD WIRE AN RV PEDESTAL WITH A 50 A, 30 A, AND 15 A Receptacles) that dogbone if wired as I assume, would yield two legs of 120 at 30 amps.

Soooooooooooooooo it depends on how the RV Power Pedestal is configured to determine what that dogbone adapter can supply. As long as the pedestal has two 120 volt receptacles (how Id wire and whats Id hope and expect) on two separate 180 out of phase 120 volt L1 & L2 legs IT WILL WORK TO SUPPLY YOU WITH TWO LEGS OF 120 AT 30 AMPS CAPACITY.

NOTE that adapter isn't going to give you what you asked for  "maybe get 45-50amps of power at a box that does not have a 50amp outlet"   if theres no 50 amp capacity in the pedestal. It "might" give you two legs of 120 BUT THE DOGBONE CANT CREATE AMPACITY THAT ISNT THERE TO BEGIN WITH !!!!!!!!!!!!!

Im NOT saying it cant work, Im ONLY saying it doesn't create energy or ampacity.

NOTE a possible problem may be overloading a common Neutral if you use two legs of 120 that are in phase, since the Neutral current would add VERSUS cancel each other out if the two legs were 180 out of phase.

Nuff said, hope this helps you understand the uses and limitations of what that adapter can do as ITS SUBJECT TO HOW THE POWER PEDESTAL WAS WIRED. There's a good chance (100% had I designed it and how a park SHOULD) it can give you two legs of 120 and 30 amps...........

John T

 

I read a lot of this in my research, thanks so much for such a detailed answer.

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6 hours ago, rynosback said:

I read about that as a GFI will trip.

It certainly would, but so far I can't remember ever having seen a GFI circuit breaker on an RV pedestal. 

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The wiring of outlets at RV sites can be very strange. 

We volunteered at one Texas State Park that told us they had 50 amp service at the site.  When I tested it things didn't seem right, so I opened the box and found a single hot wire coming into one side of the 50 amp outlet, with a jumper from that wire to the second side.  They'd taken a  30 amp service and "converted" it to 50 amp without running the proper wiring.

They also had a FEMA trailer used by an intern that was connected with three, 30 amp extension cords to an outlet about 100' away.  I wonder what the voltage drop was on that trailer with the A/C running.

Kirk - Many (but certainly not all) of the "modern" RV hook-ups that I've seen with 50, 30, and 15/20 amp outlets have incorporated a GFCI outlet for the latter. 

Electrical hookups include 20, 30 & 50 amp - Picture of Grand ...

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32 minutes ago, mptjelgin said:

Kirk - Many (but certainly not all) of the "modern" RV hook-ups that I've seen with 50, 30, and 15/20 amp outlets have incorporated a GFCI outlet for the latter. 

 While several years ago I didn't see many GFCI protected 15/20 amp RECEPTACLES in RV Park Power Pedestals HOWEVER nowadays "many" I see indeed have a 15/20 amp GFCI protected RECEPTACLE like pictured in the post immediately above. But I don't stay in all that many commercial parks nowadays so I'm behind the times lol

NOTE the CIRCUIT BREAKER could be GFCI protected in which case the RECEPTACLE might be a regular NON GFCI  NEMA 5-15R ?? Its been my experience due to poor quality or faulty wiring or dirt or moisture especially in exterior receptacles, there might be a lot of "nuisance tripping" when an RV is plugged into a GFCI protected circuit, sort of "goes with the territory."  It only takes approximately 0.005 amps of fault current to trip and thats not much if dirt or moisture is present

And YES unfortunately some parks have but a single leg of 120 wired to the 50 amp outlets grrrrrrrrrrrr

 

John T

 

32 minutes ago, mptjelgin said:

 

 

Edited by oldjohnt

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3 minutes ago, oldjohnt said:

While several years ago I didn't see many GFCI protected 15/20 amp RECEPTACLES in RV

Those I have seen also, but as far as I know there are no 30a or 50a outlets that are GFCI. Eaton sells both but they are a metal box with the outlet and a GFCI circuit breaker. I have expected to see RV parks to be required to use a GFCI breaker at the pedestal and wonder if it isn't code by now in some places. In thinking about it, I don't believe that we have stayed in any parks that were built in the past couple of years on any of our more recent trips, which could well be the reason I haven't yet seen any. One thing for sure, if a park does put in pedestals with GFCI breakers they will be forced to replace a lot of the worn, weathered, and generally beat-up outlets that are pretty commonly found in some parks. I'd bet that I have used some that would trip a GFCI based on their condition. 

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The GFCI problem occurs when a 'Y' adapter is plugged into the typical TT-30R 30 amp and a 15/20 amp GFCI protected outlet used at many RV sites without 50 amp service. The GFCI breaker or outlet will trip disconnecting one leg of the adapter's 50 amp receptacle.

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2 hours ago, Kirk W said:

It certainly would, but so far I can't remember ever having seen a GFI circuit breaker on an RV pedestal. 

 

2 hours ago, mptjelgin said:

Kirk - Many (but certainly not all) of the "modern" RV hook-ups that I've seen with 50, 30, and 15/20 amp outlets have incorporated a GFCI outlet for the latter. 

1 hour ago, Kirk W said:

 

 

1 hour ago, Kirk W said:

I have expected to see RV parks to be required to use a GFCI breaker at the pedestal and wonder if it isn't code by now in some places

 

VERY FUN AND INFORMATIVE THREAD, THANKS TO ALL WHO RESPONDED. For those who may be (I for one am lol) interested in deeper more technical commentary check out Mike Sokols (No Shock Zone) comments, a portion of which is posted below. As a long retired n rusty power distribution design engineer, I understand Mike's (I've attended his as well as numerous NEC seminars) comments and reasoning.........  

NOTE even if the 30 and 50 amp pedestals receptacles are NOT GFCI protected, its still possible to protect individual critical/hazardous branch circuits in or outside the RV such as external receptacles or those in the kitchen or bath, surely Mike let that be known, I may e mail him. 

Thirty- and fifty-amp GFCIs in campgrounds – not a good idea

 

 So here’s the big reason this is a bad idea. If the NEC code were to be fully implemented, I believe there would be lots of random GFCI tripping on the 30- and 50-amp breakers in campgrounds. The first time a camper comes back from a day trip and finds his air conditioner shut down and his or her pet suffering in the heat, or their refrigerator off with a bunch of spoiled food, they will figure out a way around the 30/50-amp GFCI tripping problem.

 

The rollback to the 2017 code requirements in the 2020 code is only a temporary fix since it still allows local electrical inspectors (the AHJ, or Authority Having Jurisdiction) in every state and county to decide if they want to force campgrounds to spend tens to hundreds of thousands of dollars upgrading their pedestals to 30- and 50-amp GFCI breakers. And once again, forcing GFCI protection on 30- and 50-amp breakers won’t save lives, and may actually increase shock hazards since there will be a ton of YouTube videos showing everyone how to break off their shore power ground pins. (Don’t do it. That’s a very dangerous “fix.”)

What we can learn from this is that there needs to be better coordination and cooperation among campground organizations such as ARVC, RV manufacturer organizations such as the RVIA, RV technician training organizations such as the RVDA, and electrical inspection organizations such as the NEC.

Interestingly, many of those same organizations have been contacting me for an interpretation on what this could possibly mean and, as mentioned already, I’m being misquoted in NEC meetings. So if any or all of the above groups would like me to help figure this out, with perhaps a few demonstrations and explanations of why 30- and 50-amp GFCIs could introduce a lot of additional shock hazards, I’m at the ready. All they have to do is contact me to get the discussion going. Write to me at mike(at)rvtravel.com.

 

https://www.rvtravel.com/30-and-50-amp-gfcis-in-campgrounds/

 

Take care yall

 

John T

 

 

Edited by oldjohnt

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John, most standard GFCI outlets and breakers work perfectly well without a ground connection. The device senses an imbalance between the hot and neutral current when a leak to an unrelated ground occurs, causing the device to trip. The ground connection on the outlets only serve to pass the normal safety ground along just as is done on standard outlets. GFCI breakers on the other hand, only have hot and neutral connections. On primary panels of course, the neutral and ground may be bonded, but that's irrelevant to the GFCI operation.

I should add one failing when a ground is not present at a GFCI outlet. The built in test circuit will not function since it creates a small ground leak in order to trip the monitoring circuit. The GFCI protection will still work as intended though. 

Edited by Dutch_12078

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23 minutes ago, Dutch_12078 said:

John, most standard GFCI outlets and breakers work perfectly well without a ground connection. The device senses an imbalance between the hot and neutral current when a leak to an unrelated ground occurs, causing the device to trip. The ground connection on the outlets only serve to pass the normal safety ground along just as is done on standard outl

Dutch, EXACTLY electrical engineers like myself and most electricians and even some lay people know and understand all that HOWEVER many lay people DO NOT. I've heard them proclaim THEY DONT WORK ABSENT A GROUND LOL..I have explained on here how they work but will go over it once more:

ONLY the Hot and Neutral pass through a Torroid Coil there's no Ground inside there. Current flow inside the coil would induce a voltage !!! If the current flowing in via the Hot is the same as that being returned by the Neutral they cancel each other out so there's no induced voltage an no trip HOWEVER if theres as little as 0.005 amps of fault current flowing elsewhere, it trips.

NOTICE That was Mike Sokol discussing removing ground pins NOTTTTTTTTTTTTT ME  Ive attended his seminars (but a ton more NEC seminars)  and he seems pretty sharp and surely knows that but those are HIS WORDS not MINE. I didnt follow his reasoning cutting the ground pin would prevent GFCI tripping I MAY E MAIL HIM.

FYI There is to be ONLY ONE MUST BE AND REQUIRED Neutral Ground Bond, often at the main service entrance distribution panel which is why in the RV panel the Ground and Neutral Busses are electrically insulated and isolated from each other

Pleasure sparky chatting with you Dutch, God Bless and take care now

John T  Longgggggggggg retired and rusty power distribution design engineer so noooooooo warranty lol

Edited by oldjohnt

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1 minute ago, oldjohnt said:

Dutch, EXACTLY we engineers and electricians and even many lay people know and understand all that 

I expected you did, John, but then you mentioned removing ground pins to defeat the devices which doesn't work besides being dangerous.

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17 minutes ago, Dutch_12078 said:

I expected you did, John, but then you mentioned removing ground pins to defeat the devices which doesn't work besides being dangerous.

That was NOTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT me mentioning removing ground pins, that was a quote of Mike Sokol. See above, I say the GFCI works independent of any ground, ONLY the Hot and Neutral pass through the Torroid Coil NO ground wires IE they sense and detect ONLY hot and Neutral currents 

Hey I know you know all that as do I,  but so many do not, maybe together we can help educate them ???

Always a pleasure sparky chatting with you Dutch, thanks for your comments

John T 

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52 minutes ago, oldjohnt said:

There is to be ONLY ONE MUST BE AND REQUIRED Neutral Ground Bond, often at the main service entrance distribution panel which is why in the RV panel the Ground and Neutral Busses are electrically insulated and isolated from each other

To put that into laymen's terms, the RV is electrically just one big appliance to the system that supplies it shore power. Like any appliance, the safety ground should be connected to the ground wire and it to the ground pin of the power plug. 

The rubber tires pretty much prevent one from having a true earth ground as well. 

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4 hours ago, mptjelgin said:

The wiring of outlets at RV sites can be very strange. 

We volunteered at one Texas State Park that told us they had 50 amp service at the site.  When I tested it things didn't seem right, so I opened the box and found a single hot wire coming into one side of the 50 amp outlet, with a jumper from that wire to the second side.  They'd taken a  30 amp service and "converted" it to 50 amp without running the proper wiring.

They also had a FEMA trailer used by an intern that was connected with three, 30 amp extension cords to an outlet about 100' away.  I wonder what the voltage drop was on that trailer with the A/C running.

Kirk - Many (but certainly not all) of the "modern" RV hook-ups that I've seen with 50, 30, and 15/20 amp outlets have incorporated a GFCI outlet for the latter. 

Electrical hookups include 20, 30 & 50 amp - Picture of Grand ...

That is the thing, you never know how they wired it.

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1 hour ago, rynosback said:

That is the thing, you never know how they wired it.

YOU GOT THAT RIGHT. Its my opinion after 49 years of RV ing all over the USA "some" (not all) park owners figure they know it all (wired their garage while downing a case of beer and by golly it works so they're experts) and its simple SO THEY OR THEIR HIRED HAND OR BROTHER IN LAW who don't have a clue wire the pedestals themselves which may be why sooooooooooooooo many are unsafe, improper and NOT in accordance with NEC grrrrrrrrrrrrr. I couldn't count how many I have seen that are incorrect especially when it comes to Neutrals and Grounds either not being present or mix and matched or double N/G bonding or no Neutral earth grounding on and on and on, but hey most don't know the difference which is why EMS and Surge Protectors and Testers are a good thing. The other thing is many parks are olddddddddddd and don't have the ampacity for todays energy hogs......

 

Done ranting lol

John T   

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