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TV set up


virginiasean

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Sean and I are wondering about the TV set up over there in USA. I have seen reference to satellite dishes so if we get one will there be free view or do we need to subscribe to a package of some sort? what would we get if we didn't have a satellite? ...could you explain what our choices would be and what we would need for each choice in regards to TV requirements...hope thats as clear as mud to understand...

thanks in advance

Virginia

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I've never had a satellite dish on an RV, nor do I want one.  When I had one in a house, there were 5 or 6 channels that were viewable without a subscription, but they were mostly promos to show you what you're missing without a subscription.  Most (all?) RVs come with some sort of OTA (over the air) antenna that can be used to pick up local stations for free.  You might pick up a few of the networks and a few independents, depending on the area you're in.  Out here in the sticks, I can pull in about 15 channels over the air.  Go 20 miles East, and it's 1 or 2.  What you choose depends on the type of programming you want to watch.

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Satellite TV is all of it by paid subscription but the rental RV will have an "over air" antenna that picks up the local TV stations for free. Just how many stations you can receive will depend on where you are an how many stations are in range. There will probably be times that you get no TV at all, but I would not recommend spending the money for a satellite dish and subscription. Most of them ask for at least a 1 year contract and some more than that. The dishes are not cheap and the service requires a monthly payment.

Good travelin !...............Kirk

Full-time 11+ years...... Now seasonal travelers.
Kirk & Pam's Great RV Adventure

            images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQqFswi_bvvojaMvanTWAI

 

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We have no need for satellite on our RV.  Have not found a place we have been where I could not get a couple decent OTA channels.  We do carry about 100 DVDs, so we don't have any problem with the electric babysitter when bored with hiking/touring in the area we are in.  We also subscribe to Verizon's above unlimited so as long as we have a signal, we find plenty to entertain ourselves with.

2002 Fifth Avenue RV (RIP) 2015 Ram 3500 Mega-cab DRW(38k miles), 6.7L Cummins Diesel, A668RFE, 3.73, 14,000 GVWR, 5,630 Payload, 27,300 GCWR, 18,460 Max Trailer Weight Rating(For Sale) , living in the frigid north, ND.

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There are lots of places in the USA where there is no OTA coverage...and we stay at many of them.  However, if you stick around major metropolitan areas, picking up OTA shouldn't be a problem.

If you're just visiting this country, I'm not sure I'd invest the money in a satellite system and subscription (from either DirecTV or Dish).  For a dome, which would be the only practical solution for a rental, you'd spend a few hundred dollars and a basic subscription would cost you around $35 - $60 per month.  If you plan on purchasing an RV here, a dome is still a practical solution (even with their limitations), considering a permanently roof-mounted satellite dish can cost you a couple thousand dollars installed.

If it were me, I'd rely on OTA and, if you stay at RV parks, many of them have cable available.

LindaH
2014 Winnebago Aspect 27K
2011 Kia Soul

 

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Other than the wiring diagram of Concorde supersonic aeroplanes and mobile phone plans, nothing is as complicated as figuring out television sets, wires, antennas, cable types, remote controllers, satellite, over the air, smart tv, ....

😁

"Are we there yet?" asked no motorcycle rider, ever. 

 

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7 hours ago, noteven said:

Other than the wiring diagram of Concorde supersonic aeroplanes and mobile phone plans, nothing is as complicated as figuring out television sets, wires, antennas, cable types, remote controllers, satellite, over the air, smart tv, ....

😁

But, it doesn't have to be. Put up the antenna, turn on the TV, choose a channel. Done.

Linda

Blog: http://sandcastle.sandsys.org/

Former Rigs: Liesure Travel van, Winnebago View 24H, Winnebago Journey 34Y, Sportsmobile Sprinter conversion van

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2 hours ago, rm.w/aview said:

With the understanding that you are movie fans, Linda's reference to Redbox sounds appealing. But, based on your itinerary, I wrestle with the notion of television when on a short holiday to a land that can occupy every waking hour.

Short holiday trips require down time to keep from burning out. Sure you could study the brochures for your next destination but that's not true downtime. The brain needs a break as much as the body does. Movies can provide both.

Linda

Blog: http://sandcastle.sandsys.org/

Former Rigs: Liesure Travel van, Winnebago View 24H, Winnebago Journey 34Y, Sportsmobile Sprinter conversion van

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Virginia,

I agree with the folks that say just use the built in antenna on your RV, and make sure it works before you rent or buy it. The sales guy will demonstrate it. I made this response detailed and how I did/do it, YMMV

I don't do satellite since the old 1 Meter dish with actuator systems. So I'll leave that up to the others. Are you buying an RV here to resell? Or renting? Rentals should have a DVD player maybe even a BluRay which will play DVDs too, a flat screen US/Canada TB set, an antenna on the roof you can rotate from inside to zero in on the strongest signal.

Were I coming over from Europe, just like when we went to live in Germany for 7 years, it took several years before I had shopping and used sales down pat. We do it all differently than Tongren Belgium or Hollands Queen's day sales or Amsterdam's street vendors who are there all the time on weekends.

What many here don't know is that in England you have to pay for over the air TV, where here it is free.  Also none of the DVDs or other source disks/players/TVs/Satellite hardware can be taken back as Europe uses a different encoding format PAL, different than the US' NTSC encoding. Pal and NTSC

That makes us able to view any NTSC  signal in whatever resolution from standard (480) HD (720 HD and full HD 1080p) and now 4k. All you need to know is that you will need a DVD/CD/BluRay player to play rentals. A DVD player is about $25 new and a BluRay player about $50 bucks new. You can play European music CDs here and play US music CDs there.

In the US

We were traveling across the Yukon and BC in and out along the AlCan from Dawson to Tok Alaska, and one night we got a channel, only one, and watched the Canadian Red Green Show for the first time and it was awesome! I had to find them later on you tube because it was unreal and hilarious! My point is that local TV is at least important in situations like building smoke and you don't know what is causing it or which way to go. So an antenna on the RV can be helpful a lot. We also carried a radio with us, and had a VHS player and a Hi8 Sony Handy cam that played as well as recorded our tapes. DVDs didn't become mainstream in the US until around 2002/3. We full timed from 1997-2003. There were Satellite systems back then and VSATs in 2000 being developed. But in 1997 DVD players cost ~$700. We waited until 2003.

In any event today you can stream wherever there is broadband, WiFi or Cell systems, I still collect BluRay disks because they're for sale here in yard sales and Goodwill and pawn shops for just a buck or two at most. We keep them in those big 200 disk storage albums by Case Logic. We break out the liner notes and put them behind or next to the disk/s, and trash the jewel cases.

The newest format is 4k disks and yes I have a player now. So the BluRay disks are cheaper used. Many times the ones in Goodwill or pawnshops are still sealed in cellophane, new never opened. You can get 30 DVD disks instead of renting at 2 bucks each to keep for $2 and then just donate them back to Goodwill sans jewel cases.

But despite them doing a brisk business in VHS tapes and DVDs. BluRays which are the only ones I will buy, are getting scarcer. BluRays are $2.99 and half off on color sale days.

So if your RV only has a DVD player, just buy the DVDs at yard sales and Goodwill stores/pawn shops etc and donate them when done or keep the great ones to you. Make sure you look at them and that they are not scratched or damaged, which is still no guarantee. I wash them with dish soap when I bring them home anyway. Look up how to do that.

For the Americans here, you can also shop them online. Here is an auction for a bunch of BluRays : Goodwill online

We love Goodwill shopping and have gotten LSU Tiger neon signs, really classic LED clocks, Scent bugs, car and home stuff as well as my primary hunt, BluRays I want to keep as well as the ones I have not seen.

Hope that wasn't too much, welcome to the US and enjoy your holiday!

 

RV/Derek
http://www.rvroadie.com Email on the bottom of my website page.
Retired AF 1971-1998


When you see a worthy man, endeavor to emulate him. When you see an unworthy man, look inside yourself. - Confucius

 

“Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities.” ... Voltaire

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Been married 47 years and only on our 3rd. tv. We don't wear them out. Just use an antenna and can always find some quality or amusing thing to watch. Red Green sat. night. Funny thing our RV sitting in our driveway can get 2x the channels as out big house antenna. Been to others houses or in hospital with a 5 times ++ channels and in my opinion all crap.

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