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Lithium Batteries again...


Nuke-E

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It's been a while, but I just posted an update on some lithium stuff, this time in a couple of golf carts. Brit and Gregg may be vying for fastest Smart car, but I can make this thing twice as powerful as it already is just by moving 2 wires. Can a Smart carry 2 passengers and 2 bags of clubs? :D

 

http://rvnerds.com/2016/07/13/having-a-little-fun-with-lithium-batteries/

 

 

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I take the "woods" out and lay them between the seats & the bags stack crossways behind the seats. Still able to close the tailgate. It's a 2016, 4" wider than previous models. Where theirs a will, theirs a way. Still waiting for a "hitch" to take bikes, etc.

Safe travels.

 

Todd

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It probably won't be too far out. The controller for managing the batteries has been working quite well, and is probably the most important part of the system. I'm still trying to come up with a cheaper high-rate charger, and a more elegant solution for the stuff that still needs 12V (biggest ones being the slide out motors).

 

I'm also trying to make sure I'm far enough along with a couple of other projects that will interface with the battery to make sure everything they'll need is in place. Are you perhaps volunteering to be a beta tester? :o

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Pro-Lite has had them in their motorhome I know for five years. Ruben at Pro-lite can build you any size battery you want. Some of the fastest race cars are running 19v systems now. I have tried to get someone here to look at them for Volvo Trucks, look at the weight savings. Not only the batteries but the box weight could be cut in half. Some day cabs they are running out of rail space also so you could mount them in other places.

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Building a lithium ion battery system isn't new, and there are lots of products out there for an "off the shelf" installation of one sort or another. The key in reusing EV batteries is cutting the cost for a large capacity bank--I can buy a Volt pack for around $2K, where a similar system new of equivalent capacity approaches $20K, just for the batteries.

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Wish I could score old EV packs but there isnt many of them in Alaska. I did get 50kw of CALB cells with BMS that was purchased and never used for a project at work. Paid $0.12 on the dollar. They are had been sitting for 2 years in the crate in a warehouse. Charged them all up and they are running great.

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I would be happy to be a Beta Tester! PM me for my Info. Thanks Nuke-E.

 

Will do!

 

Wish I could score old EV packs but there isnt many of them in Alaska. I did get 50kw of CALB cells with BMS that was purchased and never used for a project at work. Paid $0.12 on the dollar. They are had been sitting for 2 years in the crate in a warehouse. Charged them all up and they are running great.

 

EVs are a tough proposition up there--the cold winter temperatures aren't conducive to charging in particular. Even as far south as northern NM, I know a few people with Nissan Leafs that were often getting less than 20 miles per charge in the winter. A big part of that is using the heat, but definitely hurts sales in cold weather climates. You also don't have the clean air incentives, HOT/HOV lane perks, etc.

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Now that's cheating! Nothing different on the carts I'm working with except the power source--I've just given them race gas instead of regular unleaded, not transplanted the engine!

 

And given how sloppy the steering/handling is on these things, even I'm only willing to go so fast. I like 10 mph better than 100!

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Will do!

 

 

EVs are a tough proposition up there--the cold winter temperatures aren't conducive to charging in particular. Even as far south as northern NM, I know a few people with Nissan Leafs that were often getting less than 20 miles per charge in the winter. A big part of that is using the heat, but definitely hurts sales in cold weather climates. You also don't have the clean air incentives, HOT/HOV lane perks, etc.

 

There are a handful of EVs up here. But they are far and few between. I know a guy who has a Leaf a guy who has a Tesla 85d. Both of them love them, but they are both close to work. I have a 50mile each way commute so a Tesla BMW or Volt is about my only options.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I did a search before posting and either really couldn't find anything on this, or I am not good at searching. Apologies if this has been discussed before.

 

Tesla Powerwall work for RV? I understand it is 240v and that it is big, but with a 7kw or 10kw capacity, seems like it would be the perfect solution for running the entire coach and it weighs about the same as 6 of the super tall AGM batts? I might be way off base, which is why I am asking the experts. For mounting, I was thinking back wall of coah or front cap.

 

Thanks,

Shannon

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It has several drawbacks--it's a size that doesn't really physically fit well into most RV interiors for one. It's just a battery system, without inverters. You'd also need a way to power 12V loads. The more practical reason it won't work well in an RV environment is that you can't buy one--you have to have a Solar City PV installation.

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for starters the price. All the power wall is, is a battery. So you need to buy a charge controller that will take what ever source you have and charge this 250v battery pack. Than you need to buy an inverter that will take this 250 v battery pack and make 115v AC. Most high voltage inverters are grid tie and not many will operate on their own.

 

The size of this is huge for an RV. and it must be installed on a wall up and down. You can not lay it down, mount it upside down or on a ceiling. They are also not rated for ANY vibration or jostling.

 

Availability, if you get on the list yesterday. You will be at least 3 years away from getting one. and it has to be installed by solar city, they they will only install them on a sticks and bricks grid tie configuration.

 

Did I mention price?

 

You would be far better off buying a low voltage lithium battery pack. and readily available chargers and inverters than dealing with this high voltage special order mess.

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I received an email that led to this. Dave what do you think of this for reducing voltage if running greater than 12 volt batteries.

 

http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/DCM3414V50M13C2T01/1102-5483-ND/5629120?WT.z_slp_buy=vicor_dcm-converter

If it meets your load requirements then it should work just fine. I'll not comment on its quality since I have no data. But many RVs have peak DC 12 volt loads in the 50 amp and higher range. Just be aware of your coach requirements when designing. For example. My coach has peak requirements in the 70 amp area. It would not work for mine.

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I'm on the go right now, and traveling without my laptop so I'll keep this short. That could be one good way to get 12V, and might be a little more durable than the switching supply I'm using now. I've been using a small-ish power supply in conjunction with a small (think roughly cell phone size) power pack rated for 400 amps peak.

 

The switching supply takes care of just about everything, but my electric slide-out motor trips the short circuit protection. The two components together end up costing about $150.

 

What little time that project has gotten in the last two weeks has mostly gone towards deciphering a nasty mess of ground connections on the house 12V system. There's a good bit of wiring that, when unhooked, doesn't seem to leave anything un-powered. If only RVs shipped with wiring diagrams...

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