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Tire Protection when Stored


SWharton

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I know we have discussed tires many times but couldn't find any discussions when I searched on tires.

 

When in storage or parked for a lengthy time we always put wood under our tires. Wood is heavy and takes up a lot of space.

 

Has anyone tried the heavy duty "commercial" mats that are used in shops etc? I would think they would work just as well. One concern I would have is the rock(s) poking through the rubber due to the weight of the MH or trailer.

 

Comments?

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Any problems with the rocks popping through the sheets?

 

We tried place mats years ago with our 5th wheel and the rocks came through. Now we are getting a motor home which weighs a lot more but would prefer not having to haul wood.

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There are several things which the material under the RV tires should accomplish. First is that you want the tires such that any moisture that collects will drain away from the tire and not allow the tire to sit with the bottom footprint wet all/most of the time. For that reason it is good if the pad raises the tire just enough to be above the immediate area surface and not compress into a low point under the tire. The other purpose of the pad is to prevent contact with any kind of chemical that could react with tire compounds. Concrete RV pads look to be the perfect place for storage but concrete is actually porous in nature and frequently a tire sitting on it will constantly be damp under the footprint. In addition, concrete is one of those chemical compounds that will leach some harmful chemicals into contact with the tire so it needs to be isolated from it.

 

I really don't like wood for tire pads unless the wood is sealed on all sides to prevent it absorbing moisture. A cheap cutting board or some type of plastic pad is a much better answer. If parked on a raised, concrete pad then all that is really needed is a plastic sheeting material to isolate the tire from the concrete compounds. If sitting on a gravel pad, I prefer to have some type of plank or such under the tire to raise it slightly, just to be sure of good drainage.

 

It is also generally a good thing to cover the tires to prevent direct sun on them and if possible even bag them in some form to prevent ozone contact, although I have not done that with mounted tires.

 

I would never park an RV for a long term with any of the wheels completely off of the ground unless they are so due to supports under the axles so that some weight still rests on the suspension. If you do lift one or more wheels, be very careful that you do not apply a twisting pressure to the frame of your RV. I have seen trailers stored for long periods by blocking up the axles to lift the tires and that is probably a good thing.

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You can also check at a business that uses conveyer belts or installs them. I was going thru Idaho Falls, ID. a number of years ago and saw a sign for conveyer belts on Yellowstone Highway. Stopped in and asked if they had any old or used belts. The guy asked how wide and long I needed. He then pointed to a pile and said "help yourself". I picked u more than I needed at the time and glad I did. Found numerous uses for smaller pieces.

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Good evening.

 

I, too, like AFChap, use recycled rubber horse-stall mats. Been using them for several years. They are easy to store, and if I'm going to be more than a few days at a location be it paved or not, I always use them.

 

Regards,

 

Michael

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Quote from Michelin RV Tire article in Motorhome mag:

 

Also, some storage surfaces can cause tires to age faster.

That’s why Michelin recommends placing a barrier (cardboard, plastic or plywood)
between the tire and the storage surface.
Entire Article:

 

Well, he pretty much blew the moisture/water harming tires away with that statement.

 

Seeing as tires age out long before they wear out or deteriorate from the ground.....I dont really use anything. I suppose if I were near an acid factory I might but I just refuse to worry myself with a lot of what ifs that never come about.

You reminded me of my farm equipment tires. It sits parked in a barn with a dirt floor all winter, and when unused other times. Now my front tractor tires are only 40 years old this year, so perhaps they may be damaged from sitting on the dirt. :)

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I won't run tires much more than five years old and inspect them regularly. Tires oxidize from air outside them too, not just from UX and moisture. When last we RVd fulltime there were no pressure sensors for fiver tires and I believe that may have changed too in 12 years. But that is another topic. I store mine now on 2X10X8 boards. They are not pressure treated because of interaction probabilities with the tire composition. But I believe I'll drill some strategically placed holes for drainage.

 

What is useful is the idea of storage because I am about to build an RV storage and use pull through RV pad complete with sewage, water, electric pedestal and OTA TV cable with a steel carport cover wide enough to open the slide so we can use it for guests if needed. Now I'm thinking French drains where the tires will sit on steel grates which I can tie into the sewer line.

 

Good topic.

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A blowout on farm equipment is an annoyance, a blowout at 60-70 miles per hour is potential death. We worry about our tires and do everything possible to protect ourselves from a tire disaster(having had one in the past). We change our tires every 6 years, protect them from the sun, have them off the ground when necessary, proper inflation, using the TPMS when on the road and check the pressure every day before starting off. .

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You reminded me of my farm equipment tires. It sits parked in a barn with a dirt floor all winter, and when unused other times. Now my front tractor tires are only 40 years old this year, so perhaps they may be damaged from sitting on the dirt. :)

And how often do you drive your farm equipment down the highway at speeds in excess of 50 mph, with all of your family on board? How many of them are belted, radial tires like we run on most RVs? Not exactly the same thing..........

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For long term storage Good Year recommend to add 20% more air to the tires then usually carried for the weight.

Don't put in more then the wheels are rated for.

 

I have done that for the last 10 winters on my present G670 tires.

They are going to be replaced this week. Waiting on 2 more to come in. The 4 they have was made in Jan 15.

 

They still look good no cracks anywhere on them.

And they just made their last 1,347 mile trip to the same location they started out at 10 years ago.

 

Only bad thing is they cost $1,054.21 more out the door, then they did 10 years ago. :(

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And how often do you drive your farm equipment down the highway at speeds in excess of 50 mph, with all of your family on board? How many of them are belted, radial tires like we run on most RVs? Not exactly the same thing..........

Only thing similar to automobile or truck tires is, they too are rubber and contain air. That was tongue in cheek, guess the smily didn't convey that.

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When we park for a volunteer job (3 - 5 months) we put plastic cutting boards under each tire. They are about 1/2" thick and are slightly larger than the footprint of the tire. They provide an impermeable, flat surface and are easy to carry.

 

We used to place vinyl tire covers over the tires as well, but we had a couple of occasions where something (mice?) carried grass and other nesting materials into the lower part of the covers. And our slides do a pretty complete job of shading the tires, so we've done away with the tire covers.

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