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Labrador, Golden Retriever, Bernese Mountain Dog


jamtracy

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As we are about 3.5 years away from starting our Full Time lifestyle it will be about time our beloved Rottweiler will be moving on.

We've had this breed for 13 years (2 different dogs and love them to death) and it's time to get a dog that is not on any aggressive and/or restricted breed list. I was wondering if anyone is full timing with any of the breeds listed in the title of this topic? Pros and cons? We are not small dog people. But if there is a medium to large breed that is not mentioned I would love to hear about it.

I know all dogs are different even within the same breed. But I would still love some comments from people living with one of these breeds and of course welcome all "opinions".

 

James

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We like boxers.

 

If you like rotties, I'd think a boxer would suit you. Very friendly breed but have the looks to keep interlopers away. Wonderful with children and very social. Not aggressive but can be protective in threatening situations. Very smart and trainable but they can get bored with repetitive training routines (both of ours graduated near the top of their classes).

 

The worst issue with the breed - like rotts, not the longest lifespan (8-10 years average, though both of ours made it 12 years). Purebreds also have a tendency toward tumors and you have to be careful to find a line without hip dysplasia.

 

Don

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Haven't seeen any of these on the "banned" list, but there be a problem with the number --3. Lots of camgrounds have two dogs only in thier rules.

 

We used to travel with three, and were never turned down at a park with this rule, when we called first and asked permission.

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We fulltime with a Golden Retriever. He's a great dog. You asked for downsides so I won't bother with all the positives LOL!!

His bed takes up it's fair share of floor space,, but not bad.

And he sheds a bit more than I like but again not bad. Ours gets brushed almost every day.

And the longer hair does gather some moisture on wet days.

All of the above can be said about a number of other breeds. For me if we didn't have Jack when we went fulltime I probably wouldn't have a dog. But because we did he will most certainly be living the fulltime life right along with us.

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Susan and I wouldn't go anywhere without our Chocolate labs. Koko, passed away in 2011, now it is only Della and she is 11.5 years old. I wouldn't part with either of them for any amount of money. They are the reason we ended up with a 40ft with 2 slides. They were our hiking companions in desert and NF areas. The one thing I would stress is proper training and continue with it. Ours love to work and learn new things.

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  • Google "top 10 smartest dogs" and see the breeds listed (several in your post).

To my mind, the Shetland Sheepdog is a good mid size RV companion. Reputable breeders that socialize puppies extremely well is the key to a good family dog. One such breeder is http://syler.com/sagebrush/PuppyRaising.htm . I am not affiliated with the breeder and have not met them, just like the description of how they raise the pups.

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I have been around a lot of Labs and when young they can be very energetic. We have had three Goldens over the past 30 years. They are more laid back. As mentioned, the shedding is substantial. Ours never met a puddle or body of water they didn't like and it took them all day to dry. Ours suffered greatly in the heat(anything over about 70 degrees). They were very content to lay in the RV or by our chairs under the awning. The long hair is a dust, burr and in the desert a cholla magnet. Like many large breeds, they do have some medical issues including hip dysplasia, eye problems and cancer. We lost our 13 year old at Graceland last Fall and I am currently looking for a replacement. She was blind the last three years and still enjoyed traveling and retrieving when it was safe for her to do so. She took directions, right, left, back and come and followed her nose to find toys or birds.

 

 

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A number of RV parks limit the weight of pets to 30# and some as low as 20#. You might want to consider this. We have had schnauzers for 43 years now and on number 4 (14 year old rescue female miniature) and number 5, a almost 4 year old standard female. Both are fairly high energy and require some walking. The miniature does not shed at all and the standard shed very little. Neither get a doggie smell.

 

Ken

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Thanks for all of the comments. We are one dog at time people. I never really considered the weight limit restriction. But that might be a sacrifice we would have to consider. Maybe no dog at all in the beginning. Thanks again for the comments.

 

James

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I've seen all three on the BullS--t Lists. Labs, GRs and Berneses are so mellow. BSL and bully lists depend on where you go. I have a border collie and work with labs and GRs all the time. GR's are the 3rd or 4th smartest dog in the world. Go with that then train for either the Canine Good Citizen (CGC) title from the AKC and/or about service dog Public Access Training. Then make a commitment to the good training and well being of your dog. Then train your dog to one of those standards.

 

I know someone will comment. You don't have to have a service dog or be disabled to train your dog to PAT. It's just that the basic Public Access Training standard is the best there is for a dog that is seen in public places. Also makes it easier living in an RV with a PAT trained dog.

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We have 2 Golden Retriever females, one 12-year-old and one 1-year-old. A study in contrasts -- Miss Mellow and the Jet.

 

Our last 4 dogs have been Goldens and we have loved them greatly. They are mellow, smart, and loving, but, boy, do they shed. If you get one, invest in one of those handheld vacs.

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I have a sister that is highly allergic to dogs...but LOVES them...so she now has a Portuguese water dog...they do not shed..and are great to travel with...all around great dog...Obama now has two in the white house....they are not heavy as a Boxer..which shed..but I adore the breed..as they age they have cancer issues...also as they age they may become aggressive at other dogs...I have had them all my life..i have two right now that are 8 and 9 yrs old...Paris and Mr. T....Mr. T is 100 pounds..and Paris..89 pounds....they do require walking and exercise time..it keeps them healthy....they do not need grooming.

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Comment for all who travel with their pets. Just spent some time in a western state park. I felt sorry for the two dogs that one camper left in his/her camper all day; day after day. They barked and cried until the owner came home. Or folks that tie their pet up outside in the heat all day. Some may become food for another animal. Love your pets, but take care of them and clean up after them!

 

Please just be aware of other folks. Enjoy your pets!

 

Safe Travels!

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Please consider finding your next dog at a humane society or rescue. You'll just love that dog that much more for having saved his or her life. An adoption counselor at the humane society will typically identify for you dogs with the personality you're looking for -- gentle, mellow, people-friendly, and dog-friendly -- and then you can see which of those dogs you connect with right then and there. Rescue dogs rock!

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Please consider finding your next dog at a humane society or rescue. You'll just love that dog that much more for having saved his or her life. An adoption counselor at the humane society will typically identify for you dogs with the personality you're looking for -- gentle, mellow, people-friendly, and dog-friendly -- and then you can see which of those dogs you connect with right then and there. Rescue dogs rock!

This is a great idea. We have done this before and had the dog for 12 years.

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We manage the largest park in Quartzsite, AZ during the winter season.

The company that owns the park put a limit of 25 lbs on any dog.

When I asked why, was told that it was an insurance policy.

Their insurance co. told them that they would write a seperate policy for dogs over 25# if they wanted.

Company figured they paid enough out each month so that policy stays in effect.

We try to send people with larger dogs to another park that we know that will accept larger breeds.

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  • 3 weeks later...
Guest Mary Mary

As we are about 3.5 years away from starting our Full Time lifestyle it will be about time our beloved Rottweiler will be moving on.

We've had this breed for 13 years (2 different dogs and love them to death) and it's time to get a dog that is not on any aggressive and/or restricted breed list. I was wondering if anyone is full timing with any of the breeds listed in the title of this topic? Pros and cons? We are not small dog people. But if there is a medium to large breed that is not mentioned I would love to hear about it.

I know all dogs are different even within the same breed. But I would still love some comments from people living with one of these breeds and of course welcome all "opinions".

 

James

I travel with my yellow Lab and have had no problems so far. Of course I'm new to full timing.
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  • 2 weeks later...

I've always recommended rescues. Just bear in mind they may need a bit more care than a pup snce you don't know what problems they have gone through. Rescues need to be treated gently and with respect as most of them have already had difficult lives.

 

I would like to recommend that your dogs get something more than half an hour at the dog pen or on a walk. Active dogs need more time outside on walks so base your selection on how active the dog is. A well exercised dogs is a lot calmer in side too.

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