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RVing With Pets

A place to chat with people who travel with friends who aren’t human.


147 topics in this forum

  1. Service Dogs

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  2. Dog Teeth Cleaning

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  3. Puppy RV

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  4. RVing with two cats

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  5. intro-petsrfile

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  6. Great News

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  7. Tics

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    • Ok I'm not an expert on the subject. Here in Australia we are far more self sufficient. The basis is that vehicles have "smart" alternators and rvs have DC to DC converters.  Many, many 4x4's have large fridges. Kirk has seen them all lined up in our stores. Many RV's only have compressor fridges. Few Rvs have inverters to run refrigerators. The key to having a cold fridge while travelling is both the smart alternator and the dc to dc chargers. We have a 12volt compressor fridge in our rv. It works off the battery. While travelling the smart alternator charges not only the chassis battery but also the house battery. Someone with more knowledge than me can explain it better than me. But the key is the smart alternator and the dc to dc converter.
    • Exacerbated in that case by the park service closing 70% of the camps inside the park. There were almost no places to camp. There are reposrts that the expected great sell off of RV's by the new buyers is beginning. RVTravels is claiming that dealers are getting calls from people trying to sell back their barely used camper. One can hope that is true anyway.
    • I have never either. PPA works great for me. 
    • Welcome to thinking about going to the Dark Side!  I don't think there are any worse hair brain schemes in this group! Just look at all the different configurations that people come up for their HDTs and campers.  The one item that you may want to watch is insurance on your HDT, some companies may want to insure the RV too and if you do not have it at the same time or close to the same time, you might have an issue with insurance.  We bought our HDT about 8 years before I retired, we already had a trailer we pulled with a dually, so it gave us time to get it and a trailer we wanted for retirement. We did not go full time but more like long time 2-3 months out, then back home for stuff like Drs appointments and restocking. 
    • Brake controllers vary in performance technology and sophistication. The unifying factor is that all come with four wires, black, white, red and blue. #6 Delphi Harness in the controller below is typical. The connection protocol for all brake controllers is as follows: The black wire is connected to the truck battery (+) terminal, across 30-40 Amp resettable fuse. The white wire is connected to the truck battery ground (-) terminal. The general requirement calls for the controller power (+12V and ground) to be uninterrupted directly from the batteries. The blue wire is connected to the BRAKE CONTROLLER terminal in the Jackalopee  and the red wire is supposed to be connected to the brake light switch in the truck. Easy to do in the pickup truck, not so in the semi since that switch is air actuated and buried under the dash. An alternative method of wiring it is to bring the red wire inside the Jackalopee, as shown below and crimp it together with the brake light wire (red) from the truck bundle. For those whose Jackalopee is already wired there is an option, use a double male single female disconnect Pull the truck brake lights crimp out, install the disconnect, plug the truck brake lights and the controller brake lights into the disconnect.   A disconnect shown is now a standard item supplied with the connectors in the Jackalopee wiring kit, for those who would like a one (or two) I am certain than the fine folks in the Jackalopee "organization" will be happy to send you one (or two). A bit of a "techie" info, the red wire in controllers has couple of functions. Its primary function is to activated the brake lights on the trailer if you are using the brake controller manually to engage the trailer brakes without engaging the truck brakes, such as going down hill in the rain. It's good to "inform" people behind you that you are indeed braking even though you are not using the truck brakes. In many controllers there is another function, the red wire "monitors" the brake lights and if it sees those (when you apply the truck brakes) it tell the controller to "go to work, he is indeed braking". This prevents the brake controllers from activating the trailer brakes from spurious motion such as going over humps, railroad tracks, etc. Brake switch is a good center point to make the connection, but frankly the brake lights don't give rat's behind where or how the signal comes to light them up, hence the above "suggestion".
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