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Air leak..ugh


trimster
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So, leaking air from the hose in the middle of this photo. It's on the firewall.

EsmkXxtl.jpg

I've pulled it, cut the end to fresh hose, still leaks. This fitting is part of the housing I think.

Thoughts on fixing it appreciated. 

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10 minutes ago, trimster said:

So, leaking air from the hose in the middle of this photo. It's on the firewall.

EsmkXxtl.jpg

I've pulled it, cut the end to fresh hose, still leaks. This fitting is part of the housing I think.

Thoughts on fixing it appreciated. 

How did you cut the hose...razor?  The hose cut needs to be absolutely clean with no burs and straight as an arrow.  You need to push the hose completely 8nto the fitting and make sure that the collar is pulled back completely. 

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Robert,  while you have the hose out, take a pick and remove the o-ring.  I'll bet dollars to doughnuts it comes out in pieces.  Fish a new o-ring out of your air-line repair kit and re-assemble.  Life will be good.

What spindrift said about not having burrs is good.  A smooth cut lessens the chance of a nick in the o-ring. The needs to be clean, but square isn't a biggie.  There was a discussion on this several months back.  Scrap posted the actual recommendations of the manufacturers.  It was surprising how far out of square the tolerances were.

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May need to replace the oring on the inside of the fitting.  They do wear out and/or they can be worn down by the tubing.  They will have some memory, both the tubing and the oring.

Can sometimes pick those up at a hose supplier or the resource guide has #s available to order by amazon etc.

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3 minutes ago, rpsinc said:

May need to replace the oring on the inside of the fitting.  They do wear out and/or they can be worn down by the tubing.  They will have some memory, both the tubing and the oring.

Can sometimes pick those up at a hose supplier or the resource guide has #s available to order by amazon etc.

Is the O-ring fitted on the inner connector tube? 

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Yes, fits into a slight groove inside the fitting.  Need oring picks to replace it.  And be cautious to not leave debris inside the fitting or even a piece of the oring IF it falls apart.

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Pulled the offending line. Squared the end and buffed it smooth with 1200 grit sandpaper.

Dug around in inside the fitting as best I could with a dental pick. No bits and pieces came out.

Put on a new o-ring. Shoved the line in a soundly as I could. Working in that mess of airlines is very low on the fun-meter.

Air leak persists but a lower level. The system will go from full pressure to 60 lbs in about 45 min. Full leak out in an hour or so. Frustrating. Not sure it can be stopped at this point.

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Robert,  To replace the o-ring, pull out the collet with a pliers or such, use a small pic or dental tool to extract old o-ring, replace w/ new o-ring, re-install collet, insert line.  should be good to go.  Sometimes, getting the collet out can be a bugger.  If it still leaks, you likely have a bit of the old o-ring hiding in there.

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32 minutes ago, rickeieio said:

Robert,  To replace the o-ring, pull out the collet with a pliers or such, use a small pic or dental tool to extract old o-ring, replace w/ new o-ring, re-install collet, insert line.  should be good to go.  Sometimes, getting the collet out can be a bugger.  If it still leaks, you likely have a bit of the old o-ring hiding in there.

Will try that tomorrow. Hoping I don't bugger up the collet.

I guess I'll see how they are made when it comes out, but I fail to understand (until I see it out) how they lock in and still have the ability to be removed. Inquiring minds will be enlightened... or the part will just break.

I'll keep you all posted and I do appreciate the help on this.

Next up, the rotofilter seal replacement. Other than messy, that should be easier.

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Don't understand how you could put in a new o-ring without removing the collet.  The collet has fingers that will collapse when there is no line inserted.  It comes out fairly easy.  Just rock it a little while gently pulling. 

 I have some collets that were already broken and had to be replaced.  

This video will help:  quick connect air line fittings repair - Video Search Results (yahoo.com)

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7 minutes ago, NeverEasy said:

Don't understand how you could put in a new o-ring without removing the collet.  The collet has fingers that will collapse when there is no line inserted.  It comes out fairly easy.  Just rock it a little while gently pulling. 

 I have some collets that were already broken and had to be replaced.  

This video will help:  quick connect air line fittings repair - Video Search Results (yahoo.com)

Thanks for finding that video. I see now.

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Might try this to clear all the pieces and trash.  Remove the collet and as much of the o-ring seen.  Wear googles!   Fire up the truck and put your finger over the hole.  When you can't hold it anymore, remove finger.  See what blasts out. 🙂

 

Chet

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Posted (edited)

Soooo, partial success.  3 air lines are leak free. One, the biggest leak persists. I'm thinking I'm going to get a new section of air line hose. These are a royal pain for something so simple. 

Are the collets generic? Maybe I should replace that as well.

Edited by trimster
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3 minutes ago, trimster said:

Soooo, partial success.  3 air lines are leak free. One, the biggest leak persists. I'm thinking I'm going to get a new section of air line hose. These are a royal pain for something so simple. 

Yes, they are.  Might also buy some replacement fittings too.  Not a bad thing to have in your spares kit.  Principally 3 different sizes are used.  1/4", 3/8" and 1/2".  1/4" is most common so having some splices on hand a good idea esp in a break down situation where a line might get snagged or caught while moving and line gets damaged in such a way that it ruins some of the tubing.  Can then add some length to the original after cutting it back to good tubing.  Also good idea to have some tubing too.  A good idea to use DOT approved stuff.

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So new line. And it still leaks. Worse actually. Waiting for it to leak down and I'll pull the firewall fitting apart ...again. About the 10th time reaching into that rats nest of stiff tubes.

Can't get collets. Anyone have a source for those, would appreciate it.

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Without being there, I don't know where to begin.  Brainstorming here. 

1. Perhaps the wrong size o-ring?  Make sure it slides over the tube with minimal expansion but no air gap either.

2. Tube not going in far enough?  Remove the collet and the o-ring.  Push the tube into the hole and mark the tube where you can see how far it penetrates the hole.   Re-insert parts and try again. Tube should go in the same amount as test fit.

3.  No seal around the o-ring on the pass-through hole vs around the tube?  More cleaning.  

I assume the leaking tube is the green one in your picture on the original post.  That connection looks significantly different than the two below it.  Is that black connector removable?  

 

 

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Silly question, but did you find genuine air line o-rings, or generic rings from the auto supply?  There's a difference.

On our Volvo, I found it easiest to use a deep well socket and remove the fitting from the manifold on the firewall.  Get it out into the light where you can see what's going on.  But that's just me, with old eyes and sausages for fingers.

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1 hour ago, NeverEasy said:

Without being there, I don't know where to begin.  Brainstorming here. 

1. Perhaps the wrong size o-ring?  Make sure it slides over the tube with minimal expansion but no air gap either.

2. Tube not going in far enough?  Remove the collet and the o-ring.  Push the tube into the hole and mark the tube where you can see how far it penetrates the hole.   Re-insert parts and try again. Tube should go in the same amount as test fit.

3.  No seal around the o-ring on the pass-through hole vs around the tube?  More cleaning.  

I assume the leaking tube is the green one in your picture on the original post.  That connection looks significantly different than the two below it.  Is that black connector removable?  

 

 

Good points.

All that size fittings on the manifold are the same. All o-rings I removed were identical. The o-rings I used to replace the stock ones are generic and were purchased using the part numbers within the great link to a previous thread you provided.

All other fittings sealed with these o-rings accept this one.

Unfortunately there is no way to remove the quick connect fitting. It's molded into the manifold. Bad design. The collet and o-ring are the only parts that can be removed.

I can see clearly inside the connector and it's clean inside.

I'll do the mark-the-tube trick when I get back to this project tomorrow. 

Again, really appreciate the help here. 

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Two points.. One, is that the passthrough manifold? Those are known to fail. The entire manifold may be due for replacement. Two, use some lubrication on the line when pushing the line back in. Anything works, spit is right there and handy. (Wish I'd known that earlier..) Jay

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16 minutes ago, Jaydrvr said:

Two points.. One, is that the passthrough manifold? Those are known to fail. The entire manifold may be due for replacement. Two, use some lubrication on the line when pushing the line back in. Anything works, spit is right there and handy. (Wish I'd known that earlier..) Jay

Yes. Pass through.

I'd thought about a bit of lube. I'll try that with the next 'fiddling' session .

I'd read comments on another post elsewhere, where the person solved the leak with 2 washers, stacked. Worth the try and easy to remove the second if it does not work.

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