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mini split install


GlennWest
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I posted in another thread that I have ordered a new mini split for my Teton. Got a question for the pros with these systems. Seems to me needs to be where it can blow air straight thru room. There is an interior wall that will provide this. I will have to likely reinforce it as it is type of plywood and paneling. Feels fairly solid but likely not strong enough to support riding down road. Another option is outside wall and run lines out side and into that same previously mentioned wall. crawl space behind it to run lines to floor and be hidden. How badly would cooling/heating be compromised by mounting there. Would be blowing across width not length of room. I can get behind the interior wall but it is very cramped in there. Also do anyone know of a ceiling mount interior unit that runs on 110v. I have not found any. Would need that in bedroom if I install a second mini split.

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Glenn: You will have to wire in a split system any way so why not wire it for 220 volts, if the 110vac systems are not available. The wiring is already installed at your main panel. All that is needed is a "handle tied" circuit breaker sized for the wire /load you will install. Seems simple to me. Lots of newer RVs are going to 220v for dryers, etc. Just my thoughts

Good luck with your project. Let us know how it works out.

Catfish

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Glenn: You will have to wire in a split system any way so why not wire it for 220 volts, if the 110vac systems are not available. The wiring is already installed at your main panel. All that is needed is a "handle tied" circuit breaker sized for the wire /load you will install. Seems simple to me. Lots of newer RVs are going to 220v for dryers, etc. Just my thoughts

Good luck with your project. Let us know how it works out.

Catfish

I haven't heard that "newer RVs are going to 220v for dryers", maybe the million dollar bus conversions? I have met a couple people over the years who got rid of their 220volt range in their bus conversion, because it didn't work in many campgrounds. I don't remember anyone mentioned a dryer. Many places only have 30AMP, no 220, and some 50AMP is wired in phase and does not provide 220. The 50AMP that is wired in phase is not code, but it happens.

 

Edit: Most built-in generators only provide 110v, no 220v.

Edited by Bill Joyce
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For many reasons - some noted here - I've stayed with 120 volt dryers in my custom rigs. ALMOST did 240 v in this one, but when I did the electrical map, it was cutting things too close. So I stayed with 120v. In the future I will go with full-size equipment (27", not 24") and use a propane gas dryer. Or maybe just stay with the 120v. It takes longer, but we are not doing anything, anyway.

 

On the mini-split, unless you are revising your entire system I'd stick with the 120v. I'd be inclined to put the exterior unit on a platform at the back. That is easy to do, and although slightly "unsightly" will give it lots of air. And just run the lines up the inside of the cap to the overhead cabinets and put the interior unit there. You lose some storage, but it is easy to mount and you can cover the front for looks. Just an idea. If you do decide to go 240 then do a multi-head unit and drive two interior units with the exterior. There are pros/cons to that approach, of course.

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Find the wall studs. Anchor to that with a bracket that is perhaps long enough to allow for the unit to be located where you want it and secure the unit to the properly secured bracket. I shure wouldnt think that hollow wall anchors, which are rated at 75#, would hold, but not because of the weight, but rather because of the earthquake experienced while driving down the road. Vibration is a BAD thing for things like that.

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On a Teton wall studs are few a far between. There is no wall studs in the place I want to put it. I possibly could add a stud but my ceiling is tall. I need a ladder to touch ceiling. Don't believe me and ladder will go in there. There is a solid cabinet secured to that wall. It is rigid. I can put at least 10 in the bracket. The mounting bracket is part of the unit.

Edited by Glenn West
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I'd have to see it to be sure, Glenn, but if there is a cabinet hung on that wall there is generally reinforcement. There may be a horizontal member bridging two studs that the cabinet is hung on. There is something, because a cabinet will not hang on just that wall panelling (and stay there). The issue with attaching it to the wall panelling with anchors is that the movement will tend to work even large backers through that wall panel over time. If you put a lot of them in, then you may get away with it, though. It is an "on site judgement call". Sorry I cannot give you a definitive answer :(

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Pull the panelling off the wall and router the wall studs to accept 3/4" plywood pieces where you want to hang the evaporator. Replace the panelling, and mount the unit. If possible, go 1 stud wider than the evaporator, each side. The plywood can be individual horizontal strips, or a solid piece, depending on mounting screw distances apart on the evaporator.

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Got our unit in. Reinforce wall with plywood. Worked out great. DW and I ran the refrigerant lines Sunday. That was very tough. Could not go straight down thru floor. Double flooring there. Had to go forward a few feet in front of a tank. Really a 4 man job. DW and I did it but whipped our butts. Will build frame for ouside unit next day off. Found a friend 3 campers down with welding machine. Would get pictures but lines need supports. Soon as supported will get some posted for everyone.

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Mine is in same location. Mine is mid kitchen. Just above cabinets, on wall before bedroom. Passage behind wall for access to drain lines, water pump, furnace. Small tight space. Hope you not a large person. I want to install a unit in bedroom also. Just not decided how to mount unit. Could make a L shaped wood bracket and mount on it. Ceiling tall enough in mine. My Pioneer unit can have lines as long as 80'. Very doable in mine.

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It is time to start on my outside unit installation. I am a welder as most know but in my world if 1/4" is adequate we use 3/4". Everything is overkill. My thoughts is 2"X1/4" tube steel spanning chassis rail to chassis rail. Bolted to chassis with existing 1/4" 4X4 steel plate (tube steel welded to plate) that currently serves as bottom out preventive stop. Continue out with same tubing and up to unit height location. Be coming up about 18" to clear license plate and room to allow a second unit later if desired. I am aware that 1/16" thick steel would support this. My concern would be vibration from road conditions. Those of you that have had such projects can I get by with say 1/8" tube steel? Weight is also a concern. Just a side note, I am removing the ladder. It is in the way. Got plenty of room on my truck for a 16 foot extending ladder.

Edited by Glenn West
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I've had several "modifications" on the back of various trailers....from platforms for carrying things, to bike racks, to mounts for towing a Jeep. The lighter steel will fail, in my experience. The amount of repetitive movement gets it every time. So I'd overkill it if you intend to have it in place for any length of time -as you do. An look for that weakest link. 'Cause it WILL get you. The good thing is, you do not move that much so it will reduce the vulnerability. JMO.

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