Jump to content

Wood grain vinyl dash covering, has anyone used it?


mr. cob

Recommended Posts

Howdy All,

 

The interior of my truck is very plain, its all molded gray plastic, I really LOVE the wood grain look that many of the higher priced truck have on their dashes and other part of the interior. I have been thinking of getting some of the wood grain vinyl self adhesive stuff and sprucing up the inside of my truck a bit.

 

There is a panel on either side of my main gage panel that houses the speedo-tach, oil and water gages, these two panels are very easy to remove and as they are flat with no gages in them I am thinking it would be easy to apply the wood grain vinyl to them. The other gage panel that holds all the other gages such as the brake pressure, suspension pressure, boost gage, gear indicator, and a couple of other gages and switches that air lines going to them looks like it would be a real bear to take out and cover with the vinyl so I would probably skip doing that panel as I DON'T want to mess something up and cause myself a lot of grief and expense paying someone else to fix my screw up.

 

So has anyone used a product like this,

 

http://www.amazon.com/3M-DI-NOC-Gloss-Bubinga-Grain/dp/B00L8D5AMG/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1431228741&sr=8-5&keywords=wood+grain+vinyl+sheets

 

If you have used such a product was it fairly easy to work with, did it look GOOD or cheap and trashy when it was applied?

 

Thanks for any advise or suggestions you may have.

 

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dave, I don't know if you noticed it or not, but on down that page in the "Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed" section (at least when I looked at it) there's a 3" x 5" sample of the material that you could order for $3.94 ($1.99 and $1.95 shipping). I'd expect a 3M vinyl film to be a good quality product, but that sample would let you check it out in your truck to see if it looked "cheap or trashy" without the cost of buying an entire roll. If there's a very small part on your instrument panel that you're considering covering with the woodgrain film, you might even apply a part of the sample there.

 

I would think that you'd apply it the same way that exterior vinyl film products (decals) are applied. Mist the part being covered with water that's been mixed with a couple of drops of Ivory liquid dish soap, then lay the vinyl over the surface (part) being covered. This will allow you to easily move the film around on the part (or even to peel it back off for another attempt) until you have it where you want it. Then use a firm squeegee to force the water out, which will allow the adhesive on the back of the film to stick to the surface being covered.

 

The only review of the product also mentions using a heat gun. That would allow you to soften the film, which would make it possible to apply it to irregular surfaces (like those panels surrounding the gauges), or to "undo" a less than satisfactory attempt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dave, I don't know if you noticed it or not, but on down that page in the "Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed" section (at least when I looked at it) there's a 3" x 5" sample of the material that you could order for $3.94 ($1.99 and $1.95 shipping). I'd expect a 3M vinyl film to be a good quality product, but that sample would let you check it out in your truck to see if it looked "cheap or trashy" without the cost of buying an entire roll. If there's a very small part on your instrument panel that you're considering covering with the woodgrain film, you might even apply a part of the sample there.

 

I would think that you'd apply it the same way that exterior vinyl film products (decals) are applied. Mist the part being covered with water that's been mixed with a couple of drops of Ivory liquid dish soap, then lay the vinyl over the surface (part) being covered. This will allow you to easily move the film around on the part (or even to peel it back off for another attempt) until you have it where you want it. Then use a firm squeegee to force the water out, which will allow the adhesive on the back of the film to stick to the surface being covered.

 

The only review of the product also mentions using a heat gun. That would allow you to soften the film, which would make it possible to apply it to irregular surfaces (like those panels surrounding the gauges), or to "undo" a less than satisfactory attempt.

Howdy Phil,

 

Thanks for your thoughts, and advise. Yes, I did see where it said you could order a sample piece of the material, I am going to call around some of the local auto parts places, there is a shop about 20 miles away that does custom cars, paint and vinyl work so maybe picking their brains will give me some leads.

 

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3M makes a good product, a heat gun makes compound curves easier, a single edge razor blade is preferred to a razor knife, use Windex instead of dish soap/water mix, tie a handkerchief over your head. The handkerchief will keep your hair out of your eyes, and protect any hair left, as you begin to feel like tearing it out. Buy more than you think you will need, about double. I'm not a fan of wood-grain anywhere near switches or radios, or on top surfaces, as the grain doesn't wear well when subjected to skin oil and friction. Don't try to cut around items from the front, pull them out first, then tuck the vinyl around the hole, and trim from the back. Any cut edges on the front will lose their grip, and look "bad".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3M makes a good product, a heat gun makes compound curves easier, a single edge razor blade is preferred to a razor knife, use Windex instead of dish soap/water mix, tie a handkerchief over your head. The handkerchief will keep your hair out of your eyes, and protect any hair left, as you begin to feel like tearing it out. Buy more than you think you will need, about double. I'm not a fan of wood-grain anywhere near switches or radios, or on top surfaces, as the grain doesn't wear well when subjected to skin oil and friction. Don't try to cut around items from the front, pull them out first, then tuck the vinyl around the hole, and trim from the back. Any cut edges on the front will lose their grip, and look "bad".

Howdy Darryl,

 

Thanks for the tips. From what I have read on this particular product it is not supposed to net any type of wetting agent when its applied, I'll see if I can find some youtube videos where its used and confirm this. The two flat panels that are on either side of my main gage cluster are easy to remove and have nothing mounted in or on them they should be pretty simple to do. Its the gage panel to the right which is also flat that I have trepidation about, its got a lot of gages and switches, five of those gages and at least one of the switches have air lines going to them that would have to be disconnected in order to remove the gage so they could be freed from the panel. I don't have any air leaks now and I fear I could be opening up a real can of worms should I start to take such things apart.

 

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mr Cob,

 

We have played with vinyl a fair bit AND watched some pro-vinyl geeks as well.

 

Often the Pros are able to apply vinyl in places Without removing parts at all by overlaying the area loosely with the vinyl and then using a Xacto knife to cut a X over the protruding part THEN using a Soft Bondo-like spreader edge they work the vinyl under the edge then trim the under-edge as they proceed........the pros make it look so easy........

 

I am not a pro yet so.........it takes me more tries to get a decent job........I buy 24" wide X 30ft rolls and if I buy enough vinyl .......someday I'll be a semi-pro.......maybe.........

 

Does it look trashy?....... No problem just peel it off and try it again.........

 

One caution........shiny-one color vinyl is almost worse than paint when it comes to surface prep in that ANY scratch or pot-mark will really show through the vinyl............once again the fun part is that unlike paint you can just peel it off and try again.

 

Pattern vinyl and camo-patterns are good at hiding blemishes so........think out of the box.......and if things are really rough just get some of the bullet-hole vinyl.........

It's work at first, then it's a bit maddening, then what the heck the forth or ninth time it gets to be sorta fun......more DrPepper helps some......

Cheerz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mr Cob,

 

We have played with vinyl a fair bit AND watched some pro-vinyl geeks as well.

 

Often the Pros are able to apply vinyl in places Without removing parts at all by overlaying the area loosely with the vinyl and then using a Xacto knife to cut a X over the protruding part THEN using a Soft Bondo-like spreader edge they work the vinyl under the edge then trim the under-edge as they proceed........the pros make it look so easy........

 

I am not a pro yet so.........it takes me more tries to get a decent job........I buy 24" wide X 30ft rolls and if I buy enough vinyl .......someday I'll be a semi-pro.......maybe.........

 

Does it look trashy?....... No problem just peel it off and try it again.........

 

One caution........shiny-one color vinyl is almost worse than paint when it comes to surface prep in that ANY scratch or pot-mark will really show through the vinyl............once again the fun part is that unlike paint you can just peel it off and try again.

 

Pattern vinyl and camo-patterns are good at hiding blemishes so........think out of the box.......and if things are really rough just get some of the bullet-hole vinyl.........

It's work at first, then it's a bit maddening, then what the heck the forth or ninth time it gets to be sorta fun......more DrPepper helps some......

Cheerz

Howdy Dollytrolley,

 

Thanks for the tips. For the record, as far as I know, Phil and Lou, like dr pepper, when Curt and I met we drank Coke, to me the only thing worse when it comes to soft drinks other then dr pepper is royal crown. I guess I'd better watch it when driving through Texas and I am going to bring a case of the stuff with me to bribe Lou when I get to the West Coast Rally. :lol:

 

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm kinda backwards in that I do my vinyl stickies dry and my Dinoc wet. But really I run out of patience halfway through either of them! ;) Have you looked into some of the DIY hydrographics kits? It's what all the cool kids are doing these days....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm kinda backwards in that I do my vinyl stickies dry and my Dinoc wet. But really I run out of patience halfway through either of them! ;) Have you looked into some of the DIY hydrographics kits? It's what all the cool kids are doing these days....

Howdy Scrap,

 

I am in all ways technologically challenged, DIY hydrographics kits even are. I'll have to look it up. I am "assuming" that to use such a kit one would still have to remove and strip everything from the gage panels, its disconnecting and reconnecting all the air lines that I am most concerned about.

 

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have lots of woodgrain and real wood stock cabinets in mine, but then I have a Western Star LOL :P

Howdy stolpsaddles,

 

I fully realize that I have a pretty basic truck, but it serves my purpose well. Still I would like to dress it up a bit, I know lip stick on a pig but its my pig. :D

 

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Dave , was not meant as an insult or poke at you, was jus teasing the Volvo guys in general. All western Stars are built like this.

I think it is a great idea to dress up the interior and make each truck unique and custom, have not done anything much to mine yet.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My daughter did her Graphic Design internship with a older gentleman who patented the process of turning a modern "bus" into a "trolley" using vinyl overlays years ago. He's mostly retired now, but still does custom fit woodgrain vinyl designs for antique cars and boats. I've seen his work and its awesome. He had a 1940's car dash sitting there they were custom fitting new woodgrain on...and it looked like real cherry that had been hand polished for hours. A nicer guy you couldn't find. I don't know if he still does this kind of work, but check it out. http://www.trolleyillusions.com/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Even though we have the woodgrain dash in ours, I would probably lean more to using a carbon fiber vinyl to give it a more modern look. Hmmm may be a task for next winter. The best way would be to remove the components but if you careful you might be able to put it on and trim up to the edge. You could also lay it out and leave a border around the components to make it looked like it was planned to be that way. Do you have picture of your dash? I had ours apart to change gauge bulbs and it was not bad.

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hydrowatchamacallit process (Water transfer) - lots of U tube video's - I wonder if a guy can order film showing a squadron of Urals riding past from left to right across the dash?

Howdy noteven,

 

Now that would be cool. :D

 

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Dave , was not meant as an insult or poke at you, was jus teasing the Volvo guys in general. All western Stars are built like this.

I think it is a great idea to dress up the interior and make each truck unique and custom, have not done anything much to mine yet.

Howdy stolpsaddles,

 

I didn't take what you wrote as an insult and hope my reply was received as it was meant, a joke. Its hard to tease with written words they are so often misunderstood. I am just thinking of ways to personalize my truck and I really do like the look of the wood grain dashes.

 

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My daughter did her Graphic Design internship with a older gentleman who patented the process of turning a modern "bus" into a "trolley" using vinyl overlays years ago. He's mostly retired now, but still does custom fit woodgrain vinyl designs for antique cars and boats. I've seen his work and its awesome. He had a 1940's car dash sitting there they were custom fitting new woodgrain on...and it looked like real cherry that had been hand polished for hours. A nicer guy you couldn't find. I don't know if he still does this kind of work, but check it out. http://www.trolleyillusions.com/

Howdy Jeff,

 

Cool stuff, thanks for the link just goes to show what can be done.

 

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Even though we have the woodgrain dash in ours, I would probably lean more to using a carbon fiber vinyl to give it a more modern look. Hmmm may be a task for next winter. The best way would be to remove the components but if you careful you might be able to put it on and trim up to the edge. You could also lay it out and leave a border around the components to make it looked like it was planned to be that way. Do you have picture of your dash? I had ours apart to change gauge bulbs and it was not bad.

Dave

Howdy Dave,

 

I am more of an old school guy, really don't care for the new fangled billet look or carbon fiber, if it weren't so impractical and expensive I'd be towing with a long nose Pete, twin stacks and huge air cleaners hanging out in the wind, 10-4.

 

Right now I have my dash all torn apart doing some wiring so I have extra 12 volt recepticels, (sp) I'll post up some photos when I get it all back together.

 

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a note on "Real Wood" we have a couple older Jags with the dash made from........TREES........and keeping them looking like a new Concert Grand Piano is no easy task......with age and too much sun comes cracks in the varnish and yellowing.

 

Vinyl might look a little .........vinyl......but Real Wood has its challenges as well.....

 

Cheerz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
RVers Online University

campgroundviews.com

Our program provides accurate individual wheel weights for your RV, toad, and tow vehicle, and will help you trim the pounds if you need to.

RV Cable Grip

All the water you need...No matter where you go

Country Thunder Iowa

Nomad Internet

Rv Share

Dish For My RV.

RV Air.

Find out more or sign up for Escapees RV'ers Bootcamp.

Advertise your product or service here.

The Rvers- Now Streaming

RVTravel.com Logo



×
×
  • Create New...