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Tariff on wine to Canada


Jim Corey

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I'll post this here rather than Road to Escapade. Can't find the fee to take in more than the 1.5 litre exemption. We routinely have a case or so while we travel. We'll cross into Canada near Detroit, do Quebec, then down into Vermont. LP

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It's my understanding that the duty (fee) for taking excess alcohol into Canada varies from province to province. I've been told that to some degree the duty percentage depends on whether or not the province in question produces its own spirits, wine or beer, but I don't know the truth to that.

 

Here's a calculator that let's you figure out how much you will owe depending on the quantity and type of alcoholic beverage you are bringing over. You will very quickly discover that it's hardly worth bringing in anything over your duty-free limit because the duty will pretty much equal the price. http://www.canadiandutycalculator.ca/

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Am I correct to assume that we can bring the duty free limit for liquor, wine, and beer. Rather than say 750 ml of wine, 12 bottles of beer, and no liquor.

 

Jim

 

Sadly, it's not a mix and match situation; but each of you does get the ~1 L allowance. http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/travel-voyage/atl-lat-eng.html

 

As others have said, we get asked about this about every other time we cross. I've been open and honest about what we were carrying and one time even gave the border guard a list. But since all of my hard liquor was in open bottles of varying quantities I suspect he didn't want to go through the trouble of calculating the associated duty. He sternly told me that "I could have told you to pay duty on this" and then he waved me through.

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We paid duty tax on excess wine we had entering CA. The agent said if he found more than we declared, he was authorized to seize our MH. One guy in our group did lie about quantity onboard, he finally got off with paying duty and a complete search of his MH, which took almost 2 hrs. They do not put stuff back when they search__.

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The border crossing hits in the middle of the trip. If we carried enough for the entire journey (maybe 2 cases, what should we do? Don't mind buying wine while in Canada while traveling in Canada, but would prefer to tote our California collection with us!

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And then our one and only experience: we had taken just our truck across and done the Niagra area winery tour. Fully prepared to pay duty on return to US. Border guard asked if we had wine, we answered yes and had our receipts ready. He asked how many different places. Because my sister was with us that meant 2 sets of receipts he smiled and said have a great day and waved us thru. But I'd never count on that happening again!!

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The border crossing hits in the middle of the trip. If we carried enough for the entire journey (maybe 2 cases, what should we do? Don't mind buying wine while in Canada while traveling in Canada, but would prefer to tote our California collection with us!

Taking 2 cases of wine should be OK, you'll just have to be sure to accurately declare what you have and pay the CA duty tax.

For more information read this webpage: http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publications/pub/bsf5056-eng.html#s2x13

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They have a good computer record of contacts with you. your friend will most likely have his MH searched for the next few years going into CA. Take 2 bottles each and bite the bullet at the Provincial Liquor Store, Ouch!

The quantity is not a problem, failure to accurately declare what you are carrying can be a big problem.

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We don't go into Canada on short trips or swings because we usually have at least a case, if not more, of CA, OR, & WA wine. And these are not inexpensive bottles - usually $20+ per bottle, so the tariff, for us, is prohibitive.

 

Barb

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We are headed into BC in August. After using the calculator docj provided, with the current exchange rate, it has to be cheaper to buy in Canada than pay the tariff. 32 bucks for a case of beer?

 

Last year when we spent the summer on PEI, a 4-liter box of reasonably good red wine was ~$43 (CDN). At an exchange rate of 1.3:1 that translates to ~$33 (US). We usually buy Black Box or some equivalent 3 liter brand at a price of slightly less than $20 (US)/box. Taking into account the package size difference the Canadian wine would be roughly $25 (US)/3 liters. That's close enough to the US price as to not be an issue IMO. Surely not worth paying exorbitant duties to remedy. (Actually, the price difference is even less since, in many provinces, the posted price is not subject to VAT so what you see is what you pay, not so in the US where you usually pay sales tax on alcoholic beverages.)

 

Sorry to all those wine connoisseurs who I offended by my admitting we drink box wine! :D

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I like the twist off cap on Thunderbird and Ripple.

Not to side-track this thread, but more and more wineries are switching to threaded metal caps and abandoning cork stoppers. Pure cork is difficult to find in todays polluted world. Wineries say polluted/contaminated cork imparts impurities into the wine, changing the taste over time.

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The border crossing hits in the middle of the trip. If we carried enough for the entire journey (maybe 2 cases, what should we do? Don't mind buying wine while in Canada while traveling in Canada, but would prefer to tote our California collection with us!

 

 

Exactly the way I feel about my collection of "Two-Buck Chuck" from Trader Joe..

 

Didn't T-bird go out of favor when bowling alleys went to automated pin-setters?

 

and.........Ripple is way better as - "Champipple"... :rolleyes:

 

.

.

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Decided to take wine that will be consumed by the time we cross into Canada. Above the border we'll try the local vintages. When we drop back into the US in Vermont for the Escapade, we'll restock. Looks like there's a Trader Joe's in Burlington. Much better than paying the ridiculous taxes!☺

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When folks visit my neck of the woods, they usually buy cases.. and have them shipped..

 

Nova Scotia is not only known for it's wine, but we have @ 8 distilleries (scotch, rum, gin, vodka, moonshine), bunch of craft beer and cider makers as well..

 

At the border, you can reclaim and tax that you paid in Canada as long as you have the recipients.. or at least this used to be the case..haven't looked into this for awhile..

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At the border, you can reclaim and tax that you paid in Canada as long as you have the recipients.. or at least this used to be the case..haven't looked into this for awhile..

 

Unfortunately, no longer so:

 

If you are a non-resident visitor to Canada, you cannot claim a rebate of the goods and services tax/harmonized sales tax (GST/HST) that you paid for all purchases made in Canada. The visitor rebate program for GST/HST was replaced on April 1, 2007, with the Foreign Convention and Tour Incentive Program (FCTIP). A non-resident visitor to Canada may be eligible to claim a GST/HST rebate on certain purchases related to conventions or for tour packages under the FCTIP.

 

http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/visitors/

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Unfortunately, no longer so:

 

If you are a non-resident visitor to Canada, you cannot claim a rebate of the goods and services tax/harmonized sales tax (GST/HST) that you paid for all purchases made in Canada. The visitor rebate program for GST/HST was replaced on April 1, 2007, with the Foreign Convention and Tour Incentive Program (FCTIP). A non-resident visitor to Canada may be eligible to claim a GST/HST rebate on certain purchases related to conventions or for tour packages under the FCTIP.

 

http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/visitors/

 

Docj,

 

Well, that just sux... sorry to hear that..

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Nova Scotia is not only known for it's wine, but we have @ 8 distilleries (scotch, rum, gin, vodka, moonshine), bunch of craft beer and cider makers as well..

 

 

We've never found it difficult to find acceptable libations throughout Canada! :D But at a wine tasting we were at a summer or two ago, it was explained to us that the warm season in NS is too short for the really dark reds such as Cabernet Sauvignon. Alas, one will have to make do with lighter varieties or wines imported from other provinces. We did tour the distillery at Glenora and found its product to be quite acceptable even if it can't legally be labeled a Scotch whiskey! ;)

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