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One solution to that annoying slippery wet grass


noteven

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Flashback to my abused childhood............."Grumps" got a heck of a deal on a old WWII Half-Track that he converted into a "winter-service-rig".....

 

When the mud or snow would get over a few feet deep and the old "Half-Track would get a "bit stuck"........no problem........it had TWO 20-ton winches .........one on the front and one on the rear and you get got out and waded thru waist-deep muck dragging a couple hundred feet of 3/4 wire rope out to a suitable tree to hitch to and then winch the thing out and over to the next bottomless pit and start all over again..........

 

Guess who got to steam clean the thing when it got back to the shop..............and folks wonder why some kids run away from home........

 

Drive on..........(stay on the paved roads........)

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That is awesome !!

And a very talented as well as experienced driver as well.

When he was backing in all I was thinking was....ha...wait till he tries to get back out....as in plowing those front wheels half way to China...

Bit hanging that load off the back like that is really smart...taking most all of the weight off the front wheels...

Thanks for sharing.. I really liked that..

Cheers,

Bob

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Hi Bob - rig movers call that "tailboarding" - bed trucks are used to "spot" equipment units in yards and on locations.

 

Here are a couple Kenworth beds on a rig up along with a Foremost Commander. When these trucks pick up these loads those are 14 x 25 inch 20 ply rear tires squatting under the weight ... a bit later in the video you can see the ground mats rippling under the weight as he moves to spot the draw works.

 

I do chuckle a bit when a 10 page sandbox kerfuffle breaks out on a RV tow vehicle forum about my 250 - 2500 350 whatever is "512lbs over GCW" :D

 

These trucks weigh over 90,000lbs with no load and are capable of loading and moving 60 ton pieces. The Foremost (invented in North Battleford, SK many moons ago and now manufactured in Calgary, AB) is heavier and can carry these loads in a sea of mud. It has to be hauled from site to site while the Kenworths can travel about 50 to 60 mph.

 

Viewer advisory - the commentary describes the action well but there is an f sharp that slips in: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=31Ne26IitXc

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I guess I take it for granted that that's how the rest of the world gets by, being surrounded by equipment like that. We haven't spun out on wet grass, yet, but have left some spectacular trenches using a more open tread tire. We have been rescued from mud 1/2 way up the tires by a 2500 Dodge keeping a tow line taut. The rear overhang was starting to float the rear end, ant the front of the trailer was getting close to being a grader blade. The jacks were almost invisible behind the pile of mud they were pushing. I wasn't stuck, but wasn't having much luck with self-extraction. This was in a CG, on an approved gravel road. Just too early in the season, as the frost was still coming out of the ground.

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Hi Bob - rig movers call that "tailboarding" - bed trucks are used to "spot" equipment units in yards and on locations.

 

Here are a couple Kenworth beds on a rig up along with a Foremost Commander. When these trucks pick up these loads those are 14 x 25 inch 20 ply rear tires squatting under the weight ... a bit later in the video you can see the ground mats rippling under the weight as he moves to spot the draw works.

 

I do chuckle a bit when a 10 page sandbox kerfuffle breaks out on a RV tow vehicle forum about my 250 - 2500 350 whatever is "512lbs over GCW" :D

 

These trucks weigh over 90,000lbs with no load and are capable of loading and moving 60 ton pieces. The Foremost (invented in North Battleford, SK many moons ago and now manufactured in Calgary, AB) is heavier and can carry these loads in a sea of mud. It has to be hauled from site to site while the Kenworths can travel about 50 to 60 mph.

 

Viewer advisory - the commentary describes the action well but there is an f sharp that slips in: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=31Ne26IitXc

Oh Gosh...that was really cool to watch...

Thanks much..

Funny thing.... I retired from a company named ABL also.....but they were a Government Contractor.. :)

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