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TPMS for Both MH & Jeep


JCTex

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This thread is similar to Jack's current TPMS question but not close enough.

 

I have a 2008 Country Coach with an OE TPM system. In the instr book, it says I canmonitor a toad, that is, display 12 tires instead of 8. How, is my question? If you have a MH that tows a vehicle which TPMS transmits on a different frequency than the MH"s, how do get the toad's to be recognized?

 

Particularly, if you tow a Jeep JK, how does it talk to your coach?

 

Jerry

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We use the Pressure Pro system and the monitor has a picture of both the motorhome and toad showing all tire positions. You simply program each tire position so that it shows up on the monitor. I assume all the other TPMS systems work in a similar manner.

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The OEM tire pressure monitor systems on the Jeep are not compatible with the ones you can buy for the motor home so, as Kirk and Linda said, above, you'll have to go to your motor home TPMS distributor and get the sensors for the Jeep. They'll mount on the stems (kind of like caps but bigger). They shouldn't interfere with the OEM versions on the Jeep (they're built into the stem) but it's possible. If you only tow occasionally you can always just configure the sensors (like Linda described) and then store them in baggies marked with which tire they were configured for and just put them into place for trips.

 

WDR

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My Country Coach system came from SmarrtTire, a company no longer supplying parts or support to the RV industry. So, unless I can somehow learn S's sensor frequencies from another CC owner, there's no way to put compatible sensors on the jeep. But that won't work because any frequency other tha Jeep's 433 MHz won't connect with the Jeep and will eventually set the ECM to complaining vigorously.

 

Sounds like I need to buy a 3rd system with externally attached sensors. When in tow, I screw on the sensors, program a receiver sitting in its beanbag on the dash, program the Jeep to turn off its OE system (I can do that with an off-roading device in the Jeep), and go merrily along. When I get to where I. We'd the Jeep, I take off the external sensors, turn on the OE system, and all is well.

 

If this is the best way to monitor or my Jeep's tires in tow, then I'm in the same boat as Jack in his opinion request thread: which one to choose?

 

What day think?

 

Jerry

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My Country Coach system came from SmarrtTire, a company no longer supplying parts or support to the RV industry. So, unless I can somehow learn S's sensor frequencies from another CC owner, there's no way to put compatible sensors on the jeep. But that won't work because any frequency other than Jeep's 433 MHz won't connect with the Jeep and will eventually set the ECM to complaining vigorously.

 

 

It doesn't sound as if you understand that this is not simply a frequency issue. The TPMS systems used today are all digital in nature. Yes, they operate on specific frequencies but that's pretty irrelevant. They have unique "packet structures" and are designed to only talk to other sensors and monitors of the same type. I'm sure that many operate on the same frequency band but that won't make them compatible with each other.

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Along with what Joel said, there's no need to disable the OEM TPMS on the Jeep. The digital "signatures" used by each company for their sensors prevent interference even with other sensors from the same vendor. For example, I have a 10-sensor TST system on our coach and 2011 toad, and another 4-sensor TST system on our 2002 second car. The coach monitor knows nothing about the 2002 sensors, and the 2002 monitor knows nothing about the coach and 2011 sensors. The 2011 also has an OEM TPMS system with internal sensors that also don't interfere with either of the others. In your situation, assuming the OEM system on your coach is working well, I would just add a 4-sensor TPMS to monitor the toad from the coach. If your OEM system eventually fails and replacement parts are not available, you could just add additional sensors to the toad system to replace it.

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Okay, I need to do this also. Are their performance differences between the 510 and 507? Why would someone opt for the 510?

 

We had a 510 and the battery life was far less than advertised. When I enquired about the cost of getting the batteries replaced, TST gave me a price too good to refuse on a 507 system. Despite the fact that I think the systems are excellent, I still feel as if the purchase of the 510 was a big mistake. I see no reason why anyone would buy one.

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The 510 predates the 507, and when we first bought a TST system it was the only model offered. The sensor batteries lasted about 6 years, and when I inquired about replacements, just as Joel said, they offered me a great deal on a 507 system. I think the range might be just a bit shorter on the 507 sensors, but I haven't needed a repeater. I am using the longer range antenna that came with the 510 though.

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The 510 predates the 507, and when we first bought a TST system it was the only model offered. The sensor batteries lasted about 6 years, and when I inquired about replacements, just as Joel said, they offered me a great deal on a 507 system. I think the range might be just a bit shorter on the 507 sensors, but I haven't needed a repeater. I am using the longer range antenna that came with the 510 though.

 

I think the reason I had issues with the 510 batteries sooner than most was that I was using the system on a 40' MH and toad with no repeater. It worked fine for several years then I began to lose contact with transmission from some of the more distant wheel sensors. I am using a repeater with the 507 system since it didn't work well at all without it. FWIW I have my repeater above the ceiling in our bedroom using the circuit that powers the CO detector. There was enough room to stuff the repeater in above the detector.

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I had the choice to buy either when I got my TST at the MATS show. I was inclined to buy the permanent battery system before the purchase. I asked the vendor which they recommended. They stated that for trucks (commercial trucks) they only recommended the permanent batteries because of failures (too soon) of the removable batteries, and other issues with them. The replacement cost of the sensor is discounted and I see no reason to have removable batteries and have potential issues with them. I've had enough issues with these devices over the years. I see no reason to complicate my life unnecessarily. I expect at least 5 years in constant use with a repeater. So we will see.....

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TST/ Truck System Technologies FAQ page answers all your questions. I have both, the 510 system (for my dually) and the 507 system (for MH+towed); the 510 batteries last about 6-7 years (not replaceable) depending on whether or not you remove them when not traveling for long spells, the 507 user-replaceable batteries last about 10-12 months-again depending on removal or left on while not traveling for long periods. They do "go to sleep" at times, it's in their manuals.

All my sensors are marked with a red paint marker for wheel position, making them easy to re-install, well, except for inner duals.

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All replies are very much appreciated. For anyone reading this thread in the future, the comments above are from some of the heavy hitters in electronics and RV operation. We're lucky they chimed in.

 

This thread should probably be moved to "Towing" because it ended up being about how to tow a Jeep or any other vehicle with OE TPMS different than the MH.

 

To wrap up, here's what I'm doing.The 2008 Country Coach motorhome with its no-longer-supported SmarTire TPMS will be asked to continue providing service. It appears to be working fine. The coach has fewer than 37,000 miles; perhaps that's why. It does not have any temp change ability. So, my inferred digital thermometer will accompany me whenever I stop. It's not hard to use; but it is sometimes hard to tell where to point it. Also, if I've been driving a ways with the sun one just one side, the readings on that side are higher than the other.

 

My OE Jeep wheels will donate their original butterfly sensors. I can do this because they have fewer than 4,800 miles. These will be installed using the old-fashioned bands around the wheel core and secures so they won't come off and fly around inside. (Remember,beer, my Shraeder valve for my 37" tires and wheels is a screw-in and doesn't protrude inside to attach a butterfly sensor.). This will allow my OE TPMS from Jeep to work when I'm driving in town or on a short trip.

 

However, I can't use the Jeep TPMS when I'm off-reading. The tires have to be deflated. To keep the monitor from screaming at me, I have an AM programmer that allows me to turn the Jeep's system off.

 

Now, for safety when towing, I will install a 3rd TPMS. It will be a 507 TST with 4 pass thru sensors. The monitor will sit on the dash of the motorhome and pick up the Jeep's tires wirelessly. I may or may not buy a repeater. The engineer I spoke with at TST recommended I do. Dutch's partner in crime and Chief of Operating Everything Important (COEI) says I probably can get by wo one. We'll see. My coach is 38', the Blue Ox Aventa is 4', and the Jeep is 9' to the rear axle, a total of 51'. When I get somewhere for a while, I'll remove the external TST sensors from the Jeep and return them when travel resumes. I'm assured they won't have to be re-programmed; the monitor will just sense them when back near the MH. I'm also assured the two sensors, when both are attached to the Jeep wheels at the same time, are so different as neither will conflict with signals from the other.

 

Last, when the system wears out on my MH or when I replace tires, whichever comes first, I should be able to buy 8 more TST sensors, re-program the monitor, and all will be well. It's nice when things come together on this forum for successful conclusions!

 

Jerry

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While the 510 is the "original" TST system, that doesn't mean it isn't as good as the 507's. We have been using our 510 for almost 5 years and had only one sensor fail before the 5 year mark.

Which system you get is really is a personal choice. The 510 for us has a better shaped monitor and neither of us want to bother with changing batteries yearly. even when "out of warranty", you can send in your 510 sensor with $20.00 and get a replacement.

Others like the windshield mount that is available with the 507 systems. You will have to change the batteries yearly but don't have to be without a sensor while it is being sent to you.

It is really just what you feel will work for you.

 

Jerry--Mike called me after talking to you and it is my understanding that he answered your questions??? If not, please let me know. Diana

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Last, when the system wears out on my MH or when I replace tires, whichever comes first, I should be able to buy 8 more TST sensors, re-program the monitor, and all will be well. It's nice when things come together on this forum for successful conclusions!

 

Jerry

As convoluted and weird as that plan sounds, I think it's the only viable option for you. It should work out, too.

 

WDR

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  • 3 months later...

I want to get a TPMS for my 2005 Jamboree 26Q. Any thoughts or recommendations. I had a tire come apart on our last trip. Have not used the RV since last Oct. put new tires on it all the way around in February I want to take a trip next month when SWMbO is on fall break from her job at the school district, so before we leave I was thinking of getting a TPMS for the RV.

Thank You

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We use PressurePro. I hardwired the monitor so I don't have to worry about batteries giving out. We have been using the system for 9 years and replaced many of the sensors after year 7 as a preemptive move.

 

We use the 34 location monitor which allows us to display the 6 sensors on the truck, the 7 sensors on the trailer, and the 5 sensors on the toad with gaps in between so we can instantly identify which sensor location is complaining.

 

We recently took a piece of road shrapnel angle iron in the toad tire and the PressurePro alarm got us on the shoulder while there was still 10 psi in the tire with the hole. Saved the rim.

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