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chirakawa

Honey on my mind

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I have the idea that I want to incorporate honey into my diet in some way. I don't eat much sugar or sugar products.

 

Anyway, this morning I decided to use honey in my coffee instead of sugar. I normally use about a teaspoonful of sugar per mug. I started with half a teaspoonful of honey. It did not sweeten the coffee at all. Next cup I used a full teaspoonful. The coffee was still not sweet, but had a distinctive honey aftertaste. It changed the taste of the coffee to the point that I didn't like it. I do like the taste of honey, just evidently not in my coffee.

 

So, I'm looking for ideas about adding honey to my mealtime. I don't snack much and never bake.

 

Thanks for any and all input.

 

 

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Real honey tastes pretty sweet to me, there are a lot of stories out there about honey adulteration so maybe what you got was not really pure honey.

 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honey

 

 

Honey gets its sweetness from the monosaccharides fructose and glucose, and has about the same relative sweetness as granulated sugar.

 

 

Google honey adulteration for some information on that subject.

 

 

I use some honey here, usually with peanut butter on toast or on a pancake but a small bottle lasts a long time.

 

If you did bake with it really good quality honey can be incompatible with yeast so you have to keep that in mind.

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I read on the internet so it must be true....that honey mixed with cinnamon (lots of cinnamnon) is very good for your circulation and heart. So I have done this and put it on toast. Only problem is that is a lot of calories.

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Thanks for comments.

 

It says on the bottle USA Grade A Pure Honey, but I don't know how reliable that is. I've only eaten honey on biscuits, but am looking for more ways to use it. I'm not a big bread eater.

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If you eat root vegetables like rutabaga you might try putting honey on it. I know people who put maple syrup on vegetables so honey might work there.

 

Linda Sand

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I love sweet potatoes with butter and honey. Easy to do in the microwave. Just slice up the yams a bit so they aren't so huge (I wash them but leave the skin on). Put a little water in the bottom of their bowl. Cover. Microwave til soft enough to mash, then mash in your butter and honey. Yum Yams!

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I use honey for fruit salads instead of sugar. Stir it up and put it in the frig covered overnight and it will have a bit of juice in the morning. I eat it with my vanilla yogurt. The taste is way better than yogurt with fruit already in it. Also, I used it with just strawberries and put it on homemade butter pound cake with whip cream - delicious strawberry shortcake!

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Good suggestions. I actually eat lot's of sweet potatoes and never thought of trying honey on them.

 

I can't see how putting honey on cooked carrots can do anything but help, anything to make them taste better. :)

 

I do eat raw veggies pretty often, I think I'll try some honey on them.

 

Thanks.

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I do love the taste of honey so use it on toast and stuff. As far as health, diet, etc I have always read that sugar is sugar is sugar. Honey is sugar. There is no health benefit of honey over any other kind of sugar. You may argue about unprocessed honey but that is no different than any other unprocessed sugar. A teaspoon of honey may well have less calories than highly processed, concentrated sugar so you may need more of it to get the same amount of sweetness. That would all depend on the specific honey.

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There is no health benefit of honey over any other kind of sugar.

 

Honey can have one benefit sugar does not. If you eat local honey, it can decrease your susceptibility to allergies.

 

Linda Sand

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Earl is right about honey not being any different than any other sugar (despite all the nonsense on blogs) but since it does contain local pollen I can see that it could affect allergic symptoms.

 

My all time favorite use of honey is along with peanut butter on toast. Oh, my! That is so good. But you have to hold it level as once the honey warms up it will run right off the toast; a few drops are plenty.

 

The DW makes acorn squash with a liquid concoction of honey and butter at the bottom and it's good enough to be a dessert!

 

When we had our farm we had several hives and tended our bees (we had 2500 cherry trees) carefully. They're wonderful creatures and we loved having them and loved getting our own fresh honey from the hives, too. Now we just go to farmer's markets and get honey from the farmers we knew when we were doing it. No processing at all... just centrifuged and poured into jars.

 

WDR

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We love to make a Honey Mustard dressing/dipping sauce. 3 ingredients: 1 Big spoonful of light mayo or miracle whip your choice, 1-2 tsp. mustard (we like the spicy brown but any kind is still good), 1T Honey (adjust amount to your taste) Mix and enjoy! Good on salads, dipping for fish or chicken, great in wraps with any kind of meat or veggies or with chicken wings. Also spices up mac and cheese a bit or pasta salad. :)

 

Totally agree about the peanut butter and honey on toast. :) Great idea about on the baked sweet taters! We also use honey for sore throats with a bit of lemon juice.

 

And last but not least, a higher protein Apple Dip: 2 T. cream cheese, spoonful of peanut butter, 1 T. Honey (or maple syrup) and mix up. It's pretty darn good with apple slices.

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Honey can have one benefit sugar does not. If you eat local honey, it can decrease your susceptibility to allergies.

 

Linda Sand

 

X2! 3 out of my 5 have had mild to severe allergies/hay fever and locally produced honey was our remedy of choice. Generally starting a good 30 days prior to allergy season.. a spoon full a day.. and it really seemed to take the edge off. Something to do with the way bees metabolize local flora.

 

I can't imagine it would taste good in coffee or as a white sugar substitute, but we always had great success as a replacement whenever a recipe called for brown sugar. Particularly when baking squash it always turned out real nice. Cobblers.. zucchini breads... grits.. baked beans.. that sorta.

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In order to develop the full aroma of the mixture, pour coffee first, then let is cool off for about 3 minutes. Then put one teaspoonful of honey in an American size coffee cup. 2 in an English mug.
Putting the honey immediately in hot coffee, or pouring the boiling coffee on honey destroys instantly the aromatic component of the honey (Mellum scorbicum), and you'll get some bitterness in the coffee.
Coffee and honey have to meet 1/3 rd - 2/3rd way temperature wise.

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Hey! Its good to add honey to your mealtime. I too use honey everyday. Every morning, I drink honey water. I had a tablespoon of honey to warm water and drink it. Its really good for your body. Remember to drink it before you have any other food in the morning.

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I also like the peanut butter/honey toast and biscuits with honey. You can cook carrots until tender, drain and put honey on them ( we use a small dab of butter too).

I have never tried it on squash or sweet potatoes as I don't really care for either of them much. You can also bake corn bread and add honey to make sweet cornbread, but it does take a lot of honey before you taste any sweetness.

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Have friends who put honey in their coffee and really like it. The doctors have me off of caffeine (and de-caf still has caffeine) so that is out for me. For a hot drink, I use herbal tea... flavored in peach, lemon, peppermint, and other assorted flavors ususlly... and sweeten it with tupelo honey that is produced in the Apalachicola River swamps. Excellent honey and the only honey which does not crystallize. Very good and tasty, to me.

 

I also, on many mornings as I have a persistent sore throat, take a spoonful and let it melt down in my mouth as it trickles down my throat. Not a cure but sure makes it feel better.

 

There are a lot of good idea here. We haven't tried it on sweet potatoes but have a couple of Mississippi sweet potatoes that we plan on eating tonight with some smoked Boston butt and I'll have some on mine.

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Cut and paste from Livestrong.com to answer those sugar comparison comments as well as baking, cooking, etc. w/honey. Also, when purchasing honey from a farm source, ask if they medicate their bees at all, as it will be deposited into the honey and harvested and passed along.

 

Nutrients in Honey

Fresh, raw honey is loaded with antioxidants, though it contains only trace elements of other nutrients. The main advantage to using honey instead of refined sugar is that the natural sugars in honey take longer to digest than refined sugar. That means that your pancreas does not have to secrete as much insulin to capture and store the extra sugar. When the insulin scours the sugar out of your blood, your brain signals that it will need more sugar and you feel hungry. Honey can help you avoid that spike and drop, whether taken alone or added to tea or coffee.

Raw Honey vs. Pasteurized Honey

Raw honey is not subjected to any sort of heat processing, though it is sometimes strained for a more pleasing presentation. This means that it still contains all of its natural nutrients. The best temperature for pasteurization of honey is 145 degrees Fahrenheit, according to “The Beekeeper’s Association Newsletter” at Mississippi State University. This destroys many of the nutrients in the honey the same way that cooking vegetables at high temperatures breaks down their vitamins and minerals. Adding pasteurized honey to tea or coffee will have no effect on its nutrients, because they are already destroyed. For raw honey, it depends on the temperature of the beverage.

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You may want to check out your honey for where it is from. Local honey is best. Many stores are now selling cheap honey from China and that area. The honey is cut with (??). The pure local honey maybe your best choice. Enjoy!

 

Safe Travels!

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If you are in AZ try buying Desert honey at Costco. Not the Kirkland honey. Desert honey is darker and has a distinct flavor.

 

Moisheh

Edited by moisheh

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I like to eat directly. 1 teaspoon honey everyday. The high-quality honey contains many important antioxidants. These include organic acids and phenolic compounds like flavonoids. Antioxidants have been linked to reduced risk of heart attacks, strokes and some types of cancer. They may also promote eye health.

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You obviously have not tasted the Texas Sweets.  Come to the Rio Grande Valley to get some.  Putting any sweet substance on a Texas Sweet would be  sacreligious.

 

Bill

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I have reduced my allergies, hay fever. I have a spoon of the local honey every morning. It does have to local, from the neighbor bee keeper's road side stand.  I tried supermarket stuff that does not work.

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From the Mayo Clinic.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/allergies/expert-answers/honey-for-allergies/faq-20057927

 

Can honey lessen seasonal allergy symptoms?

Answer From Brent A. Bauer, M.D.
 

Probably not. Honey has been anecdotally reported to lessen symptoms in people with seasonal allergies. But these results haven't been consistently duplicated in clinical studies.

The idea isn't so far-fetched, though. Honey has been studied as a cough suppressant and may have anti-inflammatory effects. In addition, some experts point out that honey can contain traces of flower pollen — an allergen. And one treatment for allergies is repeated exposure to small amounts of allergens.

 

For now, however, it appears that honey may just be a sweet placebo. Don't let that stop you from using it in food and beverages. Just don't give honey to children younger than 1 year because of the risk of infant botulism, a rare but serious form of food poisoning.

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