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Appropriate water psi


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I have been using an adjustable water pressure regulator which is compensating for the high psi I have been experiencing.

 

My question is what is the appropriate setting? 45psi? 80psi? I am looking for the highest I can run without damage.

 

Thanks

 

M

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The highest you can safely use is a judgment call. As I remember the RIVA standard is that all systems be tested at 100 psi. Of course that doesn't mean that your system will withstand that much only that it did so one time when new. Nearly all RV water pumps come set up to shut off at 45 psi but are adjustable, usually to as much as 60 psi. If you want to rely on my experience, I used to have an adjustable pressure regulator which I kept set at about 55 psi and I have a friend who sets his at 60 psi. If your regulator supplies ample volume of water then 50 psi should be plenty as it will prevent the on-board pump from operating but have a nice safety margin. Most showers and such are designed to operate down to about 35 psi, assuming ample water volume. If volume is a problem, no safe pressure will be enough when using your shower or two faucets at the same time. It is rather like flushing the toilet while someone is in the shower in a house. :wacko:

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For our use I like around 50 PSI which is the same my 12 VDC fresh water pump produces. That way there's no noticeable difference in pressure when were connected to the utility or boondocking. I don't personally need 60 PSI which some may prefer, and besides 50 causes less stress on the RV plumbing. As far as shower pressure and performance, we use an Oxygenics water saving shower head and also use a captive air bladder tank to stabilize pressure and reduce pump and switch short cycling. I keep my pressure regulator permanently mounted on my city water inlet line so I don't have to mess with it each time I connect to city water.

 

Its your choice, but Id suggest 45 to no more then 60 PSI.

 

John T

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Food for thought; you're driving a rolling earthquake over todays roads. Things jar loose, including water joints and fittings. I once experienced a water line fitting blow apart while using a watts water pressure regulator set to 60 psi. I found out about the loose fitting when a neighbor knocked on our door with the news water was running out the bottom of our 5er. :o As previous replies stated, you really don't need "the highest I can run".

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I have my adjustable set at 55# and think anything over 60 is taking a chance of blowing the check valve where the hose hooks to RV. I was hooked to 80# one time and did blow that check valve and also blew an inline screw on filter apart. Thats when I bought the regulator. I did replace my shower head with a stixnbrics one though.

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I have too adjustable regulators. One on the hose bib set to 55PSI, and the coach has a built in that was set to 60PSI.

 

I feel the key here is to be sure to understand the relationship of Gallons Per Minute Flow (Volume) vs PSI. It does take both to give adequate in coach water support. But many make the mistake that PSI is more important then Volume/GPM. IMO, Volume/GPM has a higher impact on the flow to water, especially as mentioned when more then one water demand is taking place at the same time... (Especially on coach pump systems, many popular pumps are inadequate in supporting Volume/GPM delivery...).

 

Regulators to me, are to protect the hoses, water softener, water filtration, and in coach water pipes.

 

Best to all,

Smitty

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The smallest restriction determines total volume flow. If the CG water supply is 1/2" line and your water hose is 3/4", the larger hose does nothing to improve total flow. Likewise, if you have a 1/2" hose feeding your 1/2" plumbing in the RV, and CG water supply is 1/2" there is nothing you can do to improve total flow. You quickly reach a point where increasing pressure to improve results in the RV only destroys your plumbing.

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Thank you for your replies. We have been traveling in Arizona and Utah and run into some very high pressure. The park I am in now requires regulators because of their high psi.

 

I will reduce mine down to the 55-60 range.

 

M

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