Jump to content

Lost a belt tensioner


Brad & Jacolyn

Recommended Posts

Good Morning,

We were having a nice day on Monday traveling between Savannah Ga. and Charleston Sc. and decided to have breakfast at a Waffle House. Jacolyn was driving and as she was backing the rig into a spot an alarm went off and displayed a STOP on the DID and a picture of hot (once you see it you will know what a picture of hot looks like) . We shut her down and while we had breakfast I considered the problem. I decided we had probably lost a fan belt and when I opened the hood I discovered that the lower fan belt was not missing. We still had it but it was in hundreds of much smaller pieces and no longer turning the fan to cool the engine. I says to myself 'self' (that's what I call me when I'm talking to me) you have a replacement belt so put it on. Further inspection while removing the pieces showed that I no longer had a bearing in the idler pulley. About now a trucker walked over and looked and then asked where we were going. He told me that it was open road and only 3 stop lights to where we were going. So we started off and drove the last 60 miles without a belt and the air flow kept the engine cool until we got to the park. Alarms went off again just as we pulled into a spot and shut down. So if you lose the belt that runs the fan you can still go a long way as long as you keep moving.

Of course you can't just replace the pulley you have to replace the entire tensioner and they are pricey. And no I did not replace it myself. It was the lower one. I attempted it but close spaces, few tools and much blood convinced me to go 10 miles down the road and let the truck shop do it for me. Vonda is back home now with a new tensioner and 2 new belts and all is well again.

 

Brad

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Brad,

The same thing happened to me a couple years ago while heading to Brackettville, Texas. Going through some small towns on Hwy 281, the engine would heat up, but on the open road, at a reduced speed,(55 MPH) it would cool down. I stopped at a state park 50 miles North of San Antonio and made the repair. I had the tools, and the extra blood! Not much room to make the repair unless you remove the radiator, which I didn't want to do. It would have been easier to drive to the shop, but I wasn't sure it would stay cool enough, but after reading your post, I now think it would have. My bad. Dick T

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow! Must be a lot tougher on those green engines--just did mine, and it was super easy on the ISX. I didn't mention it in my post, but you could feel the slop in the pulleys even with the belt on. Might be something to check every now and then.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Roll down the windows, and run the heat full blast. It's all about removing BTU from the glycol system. Old-time farmer crutch.

 

Been there and done that. Of course, the hotter it is outside, the higher you turn up the fan. We've had a few old cars in our day and DW never quite appreciated this "fix".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We, too, had a belt tensioner lock up. First sign: a loud screeching noise when engine was cold and we were starting out at low speeds. Being a dumb cluck Volvo novice, I figured it might be some strange noise HDTs make. A little later the air conditioner stopped cooling. Most annoying. And expensive. It’s taking us awhile to learn what various noises mean, what’s normal and what’s not, and sometimes I long or the quiet F450 we had, but I get over it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rick I'm glad that there is someone else out there that saved their knuckles. I bleeded enough for both of us before sending it to the shop (and that was in then first 5 minutes). I know that we would have changed the top one ourselves but that bottom one is a different story.

 

Brad

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rick I'm glad that there is someone else out there that saved their knuckles. I bleeded enough for both of us before sending it to the shop (and that was in then first 5 minutes). I know that we would have changed the top one ourselves but that bottom one is a different story.

 

Brad

 

It was a pretty easy decision. Once I asked for the book time and his hourly shop rate ($75/hr and 1/hr) it did not take a rocket engineer to figure out what to do .....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Doesn't that belt drive the water pump on Volvo engine? 60 miles is a long way to go without coolant circulating.

 

Agreed. It could be OK, but you have no way of telling what cylinder wall or block temperatures are (maybe some secondary indication with oil temperature gauge though).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your right Brad -

the coolant pup is gear driven on the lower right side on the engine

1st belt (your broken one) is driven by the engine 'gear' train which comes out as a compound (dual) pulley drives the fan.

2nd belt - also driven by the compound pulley drives the alternator, A/C compressor,

 

The power steering pump is directly driven by the gear train also.

 

One other thing that you may have noticed is the A/C. With no fan powered cooling air moving past the condenser (when stopped at the lights) the compressor should shut off on high limit. (protecting the system)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

RVers Online University

campgroundviews.com

Our program provides accurate individual wheel weights for your RV, toad, and tow vehicle, and will help you trim the pounds if you need to.

Dish For My RV.

RV Cable Grip

RV Cable Grip

All the water you need...No matter where you go

Country Thunder Iowa

Nomad Internet

Rv Share

RV Air.

Find out more or sign up for Escapees RV'ers Bootcamp.

Advertise your product or service here.

The Rvers- Now Streaming

RVTravel.com Logo



×
×
  • Create New...