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Who takes the trucker gps?


Fun2travel

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My DH and I are finally ready to hit the road. We have a truck with fifth wheel that he will drive. I will drive our Honda car. I was thinking I should lead in the car just to kind of be the lookout.

We have a trucker gps.

I'm curious how others do this that have two separate vehicles. Who should have the gps? First or second vehicle? I suppose the regular gps I have in my car may not send me on the same roads that the trucker gps would send him based on his height.

Opinions or experiences?

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Lead or follow, if I were in that situation, I would review your route each morning to ensure the waypoints for the Honda are set for the appropriate 'trucker' route. The trucker gps is more crucial for your husband and will show more appropriate information... like truck stops... that your gps may not show. In addition, generally speaking, the trucker gps's have a bit more lead time for voice commands (if he uses those) since he will need more warning for turns, lane changes, and such than you will need. It would save you from having to radio/call back every road maneuver.

 

If you plan your routes on a computer, it's a pretty simple task to just download the route and waypoints to your gps if it has that ability. Ideally, I would want the Honda to follow, but either way, you should have matching routes in your respective gps's.

 

You might also consider investing in a set of FRS radios. They are easy to keep on at all times and come in pretty handy around camp as well.

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We never double drove but if we did we would have bought matching trucker GPS units and told each of them to use the truck data. That way it wouldn't matter which of us was in the lead as far as routing went. Or how far apart we got if one felt a need to stop suddenly because both GPS units would be giving us the same route. Unless we got far enough apart for a traffic accident to happen between us; then all bets are off as far as routing goes if you have the traffic setting turned on.

 

Linda Sand

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Lead with the car with your GPS set to the same route as the RV's. FRS radio's with VOX(voice activated) for comunication. In the event of a seperation car can manuver back to the RV. You will find a system that works. Just remember if you, either one, mumbles the other will hear or in my case will say HUH.

 

LEN

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Using 2 identical GPS units and asking the same route will not always yield the same result. I am a trucker who does about 80K a year, using a Garmin DEZL and Rand McNally truck GPS at the same time. Standing still, not only will both units give me different routes, but ask the same unit for the same route will yield a different response. Don't ask me why.

Using hands free mobile phone for communication is best. Spring for a decent headset. The defacto standard in the trucking biz is the Blue Parrott B-250 XT+ or the newer B-350 XT. Available on Amazon.

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Using 2 identical GPS units and asking the same route will not always yield the same result. I am a trucker who does about 80K a year, using a Garmin DEZL and Rand McNally truck GPS at the same time. Standing still, not only will both units give me different routes, but ask the same unit for the same route will yield a different response. Don't ask me why.

 

Isn't that the truth? It's as if the things have hormones or need a med adjustment.

 

Husband updates our Garmin DEZL often, yet it still has daily "duh" moments - such as saying 'take I-35 North' when the directions it gives results in 'I-35 South'; rerouting us 7 miles up the highway to the next exit for a U-turn because the highway beyond the exit we need to take doesn't allow heavy trucks; and inexplicably rerouting the trip halfway through. Whaaat??

 

 

Advice for everyone, don't trust your GPS explicitly. You must keep an eye out for low overpasses and weight restrictions yourself. Stay aware and keep your eyeballs moving.

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We always have the car lead. Normally about 2 to 20 miles ahead. Both vehicles have GPS and Bluetooth for our cell phones. We frequently deal with each GPS coming up with different routes so we use our RM RV GPS Ipad app and google maps to plan the route prior to departure. That insures that we are on the same page. In spite of the planning we have occasionally found ourselves going different routes but through good communications it works out.

 

With that said, we find it very beneficial for the car to lead. She can provide warnings to me for accidents, narrow lanes, low hanging limbs, low wires and such. Additionally, she typically arrives at the CG well in advance of me, picks or inspects the site and the route to insure that it will work for us. Normally, by the time I arrive at the CG she escorts me right in and setup begins.

 

This has worked very well for us but may not for other depending on the abilities of the drivers (some folks just tend to get lost more often or don't like driving by themselves).

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Been doing this for six years. Wife leads with the car, I follow. No GPS. We have one but it has been wrong a few times and not fun getting a 60 ft. combo out of some areas. Using the GPS when just running around in the car not a big deal. She checks the route on-line, has a site she goes to for road construction, low bridges, rest stops, etc. Types it out, prints it off. We have FRS radios. Have them clipped to the seat belt on the shoulder, with a bag clip and a strap attached to the radio, around our head if the radio would happen to come unclipped, doesn't fall on the floor. Haven't heard until I read on here that handheld radios are technically illegal to use while driving. Will have to look more into that.

 

Just have to remember to fill the car up with fuel the night before we plan to leave.

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Hi All

 

We do not ever travel separately. One of the reasons we love this Full Timers lifestyle is our togetherness and conversations as we go down the road.

 

The only time we traveled separately in over 30 years of RVing was on our relocation from AZ to Tex when we had two 4 wheelers and the coach in 1989.

 

We use the RV 760 (not trucker model) and Delorme Street Atlas for guidance. Never any problems with bridges or anything else.

 

Dave O

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Before we had anything other than the cheapest Garmin I went down a Virginia old road and came upon a narrow light weight bridge. Not passable. Had to call 911 and get a policeman to block road so I could back out over a mile. I now own one with height and weight settings to keep us off such roads. It has not failed in this

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Howdy!

 

If you have a smartphone or tablet with gps just use it and Co-Pilot gps app. Been using it for several years as our RV gps and it hasn't steered us wrong.

 

"Happy trails"

Chiefneon

I also like the Co-Pilot app. It works better than my Magellan GPS. My wife still checks the route with the Rand McNally Truckers Road Atlas to make sure of the route. If the road isn't highlighted in orange we normally won't take it. We still don't trust the GPS as we have had too many times when it would have led us into a situation that would have been inconvenient at best. So far though the Co-Pilot app has been great.

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