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CO/LP Alarm


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I'm about ready to pull my hair out. Well at least what little I have. We have a Thor (Damon) Challenger 37KT. Our CO/LP monitor contiues to go off all hours of the night, generally never during the day. I have installed a new one even though the date was fine on the old one and the problem continues. Someone told me it could be the voltage from the house batteries. Got new house batteries as one cell was dead, but that did not help. Any thoughts out there.

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Have you had your LP system checked for leaks? During the day, you're going in and out of the RV, airing out the rig enough that it's not setting off the alarm. But, at night, the RV is closed up allowing LP to collect. This is just a thought, and may not be the problem at all, but I'd have the LP system checked out just to be on the safe side.

 

By the way, welcome to the Forums!

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Welcome to the Escapee forums! Sorry to see that it took problems to bring you here, but we are pleased that you came.

 

If you have replaced the detector and it is still alarming, there has to be something setting it off. One of the more common sources for propane is the oven with has a small flame that must be lighted first in order to get the rest to turn on. If the oven control happens to be in the position to light that pilot but it isn't lighted, it will slowly build up to a point where it will alarm. Since this is a combination alarm, is there any way to know which side is alarming? CO is a very dangerous thing to fool with so be very sure that there is not a real alarm happening as it is odorless.

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Leaks can be a real pain, we had one at the fitting to the oven, it didn't leak much and what did leak was sort of trapped under the cabinetry so we didn't normally see an alarm from it. But from time to time, usually in the middle of the night we got an alarm when things were calm. The leak was tiny and didn't show up on several bubble tests and you couldn't smell it. We never did find it, instead I picked one fitting to tighten per month and the month after I did the stove we had no alarms.

 

These are just possibilities from Amazon, better options or pricing may be available:

 

bubble fluid that may work better than soapy water http://smile.amazon.com/Camco-10324-Leak-Detector-Sprayer/dp/B000EDUTMC/ref=sr_1_4?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1429138059&sr=1-4&keywords=propane+leak+detector

 

electronic detector (switch to combustible gas option) http://smile.amazon.com/General-Tools-Instruments-PNG2000A-Detector/dp/B001KZH796/ref=sr_1_3?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1429138059&sr=1-3&keywords=propane+leak+detector

 

 

If all else fails look for other possibilities than propane, sprays, alcohol and even rising bread can set off a finicky detector. About all you can do is see if anything you are doing is setting it off.

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I agree with the above statements.....something is causing the alarm to go off. So instead of shooting the messenger you need to address the message. LP leaks and CO are two things to be very careful with. It would be nice to know however if it is the LP portion or the CO portion that is alarming.....is there any way to tell on your device?

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Hairspray and some other aerosols can set them off too, especially the combo alarms that alert on more than one gas. But don't chance it as already said. If smokers inside the CO levels can also elevate to danger levels in a tightly sealed rig. If push comes to shove you can call the fire department and find out what the cost to rent a "sniffer" or hire a pro to come trace down the source of your alarm's detections.

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Based on the info posted and after what you have done it still alarms, ITS MY BEST PURE GUESS YOU HAVE A MINOR LP LEAK and I think its that instead of CO. Personally I don't like combination CO/LP because I prefer they be mounted in different unique locations. If I recall (no warranty lol) CO is slightly lighter then air while LP is slightly heavier, therefore, I would mount an LP near floor level but a CO up higher on a wall. SOMEONE PLEASE CORRECT ME IF THATS RIGHT OR NOT (I mean the heavier lighter thing) In my RV the factory installation has the LP near the floor but the CO up higher which would confirm my previous thoughts.

 

Its pretty cheap and easy to use the soap solution to check for leaks and Id try that first on all the fittings and connections and unions and splices and appliance entry points. If they all check out then start looking at valves and as mentioned makes sure there's no Pilot valves on like on some RV ovens, but I don't think that's the problem as that would trip the LP anytime and often.

 

DONT TRAVEL OR GO TO SLEEP UNTIL ITS FIXED, I SURE WOULDNT............

 

John T

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Time to find a pro to check this out with a meter.

A very wise choice. If you would be so kind, please do take the time to come back and let us all know what the result is.

 

A humorous story that may help your state of mind....... LP monitors actually detect hydrocarbons and not specifically LP gas and so most gasses that are flammable will set one off, Methane is one of those gasses and it happens to be the main ingredient of flatulence. I have known of a pet sleeping near a propane alarm being the cause of setting it off. More recently, our son spent the night in our RV in our RV port with no propane bottle even installed on the trailer, yet in the night the propane alarm went off and ours is not one that is combination with CO which didn't alarm. It turns out that this was a bad case of something he ate! :lol:

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Hairspray and some other aerosols can set them off too, especially the combo alarms that alert on more than one gas. But don't chance it as already said. If smokers inside the CO levels can also elevate to danger levels in a tightly sealed rig. If push comes to shove you can call the fire department and find out what the cost to rent a "sniffer" or hire a pro to come trace down the source of your alarm's detections.

Adding to Dereks advice,

Another cause of the LP alarm sounding is a sleeping/napping dog next to the detector. It detects all combustible gasses(methane too), not just LP. The CO part should not be the alarm sounding because CO is only slightly less dense than normal air, and is found at all levels in the room. If it is CO or LP, have your frig checked out too.

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I found on mine older RV that the LP alarm was connected to DC using wire nuts. The was loose and movement of the RV set it off so a bad connection low voltage can do it. I have since sold the RV but I often wondered if I got cussed because i removed the wire nuts and soldered the connections. Makes it a little harder to replace!!!! :wacko:

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  • 4 weeks later...

When we picked up our fifth wheel, our dealer specifically warned us about dog gas setting off the alarm so it must be a common occurence. This in and of itself is a good reason to have a dog. You don't want to have to take the blame yourself!

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