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Larryg17

Want to install 30 amp at my home

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He'll need to know that it is specifically for an RV and not an outside 240vac connection. You can buy the receptacles at Lowe's I found both 30-amp and 50-amp boxes but have only installed the 50-amp one.

 

Someone once said that you should hand him an appropriate wiring diagram just to make sure.

 

http://www.rvpowerprotection.com/Links_files/30-amp%20Service.pdf

 

WDR

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As said, make it absolutely clear that this is a 120VAC TT30 outlet installation, using a single breaker. Residential electricians all to often mistake the 3-prong RV plug for a 240-VAC dryer or welder plug.

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Already mentioned info is critical to be SURE the electrician understands exactly what you meed, then also DO NOT PLUG IN until after you have personally tested the outlet to be certain it is as it should be. If you don't know how to test it, you can find out how online.

 

My recommendation is that you seriously consider having a 50a outlet installed rather than a 30a. My reasons for that recommendation are:

- A 50a rv outlet is a standard 240/120v outlet that any electrician has installed many times so is much more likely to install correctly, and the cost difference between the two won't be all that much

- You can easy use a 50-30a adapter to use it for your current rv

- If/when you change RVs, you already have the 50a connection it may need

Edited by AFChap

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Same suggestion here, either do a 50 or a 50/30 connection so you don't limit yourself in the future. The difference in total cost will be small.

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I knew a neighbor who had the 30 amp. installed for his RV but forgot to mention it was 120 v. The electrician knew it was for his RV but wired it like a house dryer and destroyed a lot of things in the RV., including the converter, transfer switch, micro wave, DVD player, & some wires. The 2 outlets may look the same but are not. Be sure the electrician knows. Dave.

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Before the electrician leaves, make him take a volt meter and show you that you only have 120 volts and not 240 volts.

 

Ken

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The 50-amp will cost a little more (4 wires not three, a two circuit breakers ganged together, and the receptacle/box) but a 50A-to-30A adapter is pretty cheap at Walmart and will let you cover both bases.

 

WDR

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. The 2 outlets may look the same but are not. Be sure the electrician knows. Dave.

The do not look the same but are quite different and you can't plug a 30A RV into the 240V one, if the electrician does things correctly, which sadly too often does not happen.

 

RV-Dryer_Outlets.jpg

Edited by Kirk

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I wouldn't plug in without an electric management system. I know that they are expensive but so needed. Good Luck

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The do not look the same but are quite different and you can't plug a 30A RV into the 240V one, if the electrician does things correctly, which sadly too often does not happen.

 

RV-Dryer_Outlets.jpg

I guess I should have said "they look similar" ! dave.

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As others have also said - install a 240V / 50A one. Your electrician won't screw it up and if you need the 50A in the future it will already be there. You are already paying the electrician for the labor, so the incremental cost of additional wire is going to be minor.

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Anyone have any figures on what this 50 amp setup would cost to install? Just for the sake of conversation, say the drop is about 150 feet from the home's main electrical connection.

 

EDIT: Tweaked this based upon Chalkie's comments below. Please see post #19. :)

Edited by TxCowboy

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Lot of unknown variables to that question. Can the wire be run indoors, outdoors, or combination? Wire run in conduit or buried if outdoors? For arguments sake, let's say outdoors and buried. According to my son, a journeyman electrician, you will be looking at around $1400 depending on labor rates in your area and the answers to the above questions. Another variable is whether or not a permit will be required in your locale and how much that costs.

Edited by Chalkie

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Yeah, good points, Chalkie. Let's go with your scenario and say that the wire is run outside and underground, connects to the main power box on the outside of the house, has a run of about 150 feet, and the box with the receptacle(s) is mounted on a wooden pole.

 

No local permit required -- I'm out in the boonies but want it professionally installed to a good building code standard.

 

Does that still sound like $1400 would cover that?

Edited by TxCowboy

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Well, there are still a couple of questions. You can run cable underground using UF (direct bury) or run indoor type wire in non-metallic (PVC) conduit. According to my son, the latter will save a little money in materials since the conduit is cheap and the indoor wire is quite a bit less than the UF wire. Digging is going to be involved in either case, and to meet codes will involve renting a Ditch-Witch, unless whoever you hire owns one, to get it deep enough. But in general, he thinks that would be a good ball park figure (for around here). He is a commercial electrician and generally curses the days that they run long runs of wire that heavy. :)

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For 150', that would be 300' of wire, out and back. Your going to have voltage drop in the 300'. That will require a larger size wire.

 

Personally, I would:

A) put a 250 / 50 amp out there for the next trailer / MH.

B) Probably run Aluminum wire (which is OK with the right connectors and No Oxide grease).

C) drop a water line in with it

D) Ethernet / coax for TV / internet.

 

Loading on a hot day - enough power to run the A/C

Company stops for the night - shower TV etc is there and ready

 

A lot of the cost is going to be the opening the trench to install things in. Might as well put it all in there at one time.

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Good points, Bill. I can rent an auger for the day for just a few bucks that will knock out the trenching very quickly. Could probably do it at the same time the electrician is tapping into the main power box on the house and getting all of that work squared away.

 

Getting electricity is my main concern. Water has a work around so I'm not planning an running a dedicated line for that...yet. I already have a DirecTV wireless system in the RV that works fine.

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For 150', that would be 300' of wire, out and back. Your going to have voltage drop in the 300'. That will require a larger size wire.

 

 

Umm, no. What I was speaking about was 6/3 with ground. Wire like that runs only the distance needed.

 

Now since the ditch is open, running some other services at the same time sounds reasonable, but again, bowing to the expert my son, water and electricity are not allowed in the same ditch.

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I had two 30 amp boxes/receptacles installed on a 4X4 3 feet deep with 4 feet above ground when we bought our house a couple of years ago. I intended to go with 50 amps but in my case the cost was not trivial. The run was about 140 feet and the cost for 50 amp over 30 amp was more than I wanted to spend. Any 50 amp friends that stopped by could use a 50 amp to 30 amp pig tail and get by with 30 amps.

I rented a trencher and dug the 18 inch minimum depth trench myself.

The electrician used PVC conduit. He didn't have a lot of trouble pulling the wires but I ended up helping him. With two guys it was an easier job.

Before he started the job we had a talk about the 120 versus 240 issue and the proper receptacle to use and it is a good thing we did or he would have not done it correctly. I printed out a sheet showing the proper receptacle and connections and gave it to him.

Edited by Clay L

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Umm, no. What I was speaking about was 6/3 with ground. Wire like that runs only the distance needed.

 

Now since the ditch is open, running some other services at the same time sounds reasonable, but again, bowing to the expert my son, water and electricity are not allowed in the same ditch.

The NEC does not care about plumbing and electric in the same ditch, but some local codes address it. If you are allowed to put them together, my advice is to separate them some. I try for a minimum of a foot if the local code does not say - and 2' would be better. Make sure you put your marker tape in. You can run the cable and Ethernet in there with them - no issues. If you run Ethernet either use direct burial or put it in conduit. Separate from the electric. Remember your 300' limit on the Ethernet.

 

You can work the numbers for voltage drop.....I did not. But it is a concern that needs addressing.

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