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Using bottle propane to cook when inside during cold weather?


Deezl Smoke

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Ok, I apologize if this has been discussed and I did'nt get it. I know, or rather have heard about the dangers and hazards of using a propane heater inside that is attached to the fuel vs. a furnace that keeps the combustion separate, but what if one wishes to use a small, single burner, camp stove with the bottle attached for cooking small meals when inside during the cold? What would be the hazard or danger of this? Short periods of cooking, single or couple with no kids.

 

Thanks.

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That would be no different than using the open flame of a built in stove top, except for the bottle and it's fitting. Since those would be inside there might be a somewhat greater chance of a propane leak, but if you have a working propane detector, that should keep you safe enough. We used to have a popup that we did cook with one of those in, back with our very first RV. We started out using a Coleman stove but found that it left too much odor inside of the RV and went to one of those with the disposable propane bottles.

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That would be no different than using the open flame of a built in stove top, except for the bottle and it's fitting. Since those would be inside there might be a somewhat greater chance of a propane leak, but if you have a working propane detector, that should keep you safe enough. We used to have a popup that we did cook with one of those in, back with our very first RV. We started out using a Coleman stove but found that it left too much odor inside of the RV and went to one of those with the disposable propane bottles.

 

That' the direction I was thinking Kirk. Just needed to hear it from others to feel better about it I guess. As long as I have a good, well maintained detector, and keep the stove in good order, I should be ok. I do not wish to buy a cheap stove. I'm not above spending the money for a quality stove with good components. I could even keep the fuel bottle outside until needed if I have to.

 

Any good brands to look for?

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I rather agree with Chalkie about the choice of a Coleman from Amazon and I would get the upgraded model and not the lowest price one because the better one has much better temperature control. I would also see if you can't get one that has a conversion kit to enable the use of one of the 30# bottles, in place of those little disposable ones.

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Just don't HEAT your RV with a propane stove (or oven); whether it's built-in or portable. :)

 

WDR

 

Agreed. This is just for cooking when I cant use a pellet grill or my Weber. At home I seem to use the microwave when something needs warmed or cooked. I use to fry a bit, but not so much anymore. Either crock pot, grill, or microwave for the hot foods. So I'm thinking I wont need a multi burner range with oven.

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I actually put that in for people who might read this thread and then correlate things that they shouldn't. If we all agree that a propane cookstove is safe to cook with inside your RV, then someone, somewhere is almost certain to think that if a propane stove is ok to cook with, it should be ok to heat with... cuz, after all, it takes heat to cook. And what's the difference between a stove burning propane and a heater (like an Olympian - which so many people like) burning propane.

 

And the difference is that the Olympian (and the Mr. Heater, for that matter) are catalytic and emit far fewer bad combustion products than an open flame and will turn off if they burn up all the oxygen in your RV.

 

So don't HEAT with your propane stove. :) (Not meaning the OP... necessarily)

 

Thank yew. :P.

 

WDR

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WDR: I agree with you, but I remember that some small older RVs only had the oven and stove for heat. Back in those days, they didn't think about the danger. I remember someone I know warming up her Toyota based Dolphin Class C with her stove.

Even my old home-built (by someone else) plywood 10' (non cabover) camper had a little heater. I think I had to do that with my Alaskan camper but there were zero issues concerning ventilation with that one. LOL. Our 1970 Streamline Princess 21' travel trailer has both a Coleman "furnace" and an Olympian catalytic.

 

But you're right. We ignored a lot of safety issues back then. I remember sleeping on the shelf under the rear window of Dad's Oldsmobile when I was six. No one thought anything of it. Some of our safety issues now are due to a new understanding of the risks.

 

Others due to the insurance companies new understanding of how much they can charge...

 

WDR

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I don't like the small bottles much either. I thought I had a plan and bought a tiny refillable tank, while it worked well I got so much grief over filling it I went back to a BBQ tank.

 

Some folks refill the little tanks, that is iffy for safety. If you use them outside the pressure vent is way too close to the flame for my comfort and they have no overfill protection. Used inside any venting is going to be a bigger problem.

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I don't like the small bottles much either. I thought I had a plan and bought a tiny refillable tank, while it worked well I got so much grief over filling it I went back to a BBQ tank.

 

Some folks refill the little tanks, that is iffy for safety. If you use them outside the pressure vent is way too close to the flame for my comfort and they have no overfill protection. Used inside any venting is going to be a bigger problem.

 

Was that for all of the cooking Stanley? I can sure see it for every day cooking, especially for a couple or family. How long would a bottle last if one were only using it for example, 2 to 3 single disk meals a week during the winter? Even in the winter, I would mostly use the treager or microwave. I can use an electric, just seems like 120vac is a hard pull on the circuit.

 

I guess I should use my killawatt meter and see how much more an electric hot plate would pull than the microwave.

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We were using the little bottle for our miniature BBQ and a two burner Coleman stove, did a lot of our cooking outside in the summer a couple years. it was a while back but we were refilling a bit less than every 60 days. Sure had to keep a sharp eye on the level too as running out during dinner cooking wasn't fun.

 

Hotplates vary but most pull close to 1500 watts on high.

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