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Remember if you want quality it will cost


Terry Weier

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​I purchased my Argosy a month ago and started building the beaver tail or should I say my welders did. I am a weld inspector and hired three welders from work to build it. I have roughly $4000 in materials and labor in the tail and ramps but it is a thing of beauty it is extremely over built but better to much then not enough. I fond a deal on craigslist on a TS3 hitch not my first choice but for $300 I could not pass it up. I plan on spraying the front cap of the truck and the entire bed with a bed liner of some kind I am doing research on brands I also plan on putting a mirror finish on the rims and tanks and will install a huge moose bumper on the front it should be impressive when done. Here are some pictures.

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The reason I am putting bed liner on the front cap of the truck is to hide the 20,000 rock chips from 680,000 miles of driving I figured if I used bed liner I would never need to worry about rock chips anymore. The rest of the paint is great because Bass Tracker had the truck wrapped in vinyl advertising.

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I found that bed liner did not stand up to gravel road repairs on trip to Alaska. I had applied bed liner to the leading 4" edge of the bed that was wider then the truck cab. That leading edge now has a piece on aluminum diamond plate, no paint to chip and looks better then bed liner. Others may have had better luck.

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  • 2 months later...
Guest Lostinaz

I had a cabover for 15 years.

It was a real good truck.

Didn't ride so good-spring ride.

You learned to back up in one try-no power steering.

 

There's 3 drawbacks to cabovers:

 

You are the first one there if you wreck. In a conventional with the engine out front you might live. In a cabover at the least your legs are cut off at the knees, if you live at all. There is also that thrill of sitting right near the centerline meeting oncoming traffic.

 

When the smallest thing needs fixing, you have to jack up the cab. You can't sleep in the cab if you hire someone else to fix it .

 

When you do jack up the cab, secure every last little item in the cab- or watch your thermos come crashing out through the windshield.

 

I loved my old cabover and survived 1.7 million miles driving it, but as for the above mentioned facts- I know of what I speak. That's why nobody drives cabovers anymore.

 

I still have a spot in my heart for the looks of an old 352 Pete or an IH 4070B.

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I drove cab over Macks at UPS for a lot of years, cut my teeth on old F models with no power steering then moved on to a mh still without power steering, got stuck in a Volvo cab over with power assist steering and cried for my old Macks back. Finally got a mh model WITH power steering and they had to pry it from my hands when they junked it. Good luck, nice truck.

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You are the first one there if you wreck. In a conventional with the engine out front you might live. In a cabover at the least your legs are cut off at the knees, if you live at all. There is also that thrill of sitting right near the centerline meeting oncoming traffic.

...

I guess a diesel pusher motor home would not be much better. No motor to help absorb some of the impact.

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Guest Lostinaz

Pretty much the same.

Just that in a big truck with a heavy load behind you, the impact at high speed is more severe.

I've seen some awful wrecks in my time, like trucks running into the back of another, or into concrete overpass supports, with all that weight behind you that doesn't stop so fast.

On a cabover, the whole cab can come off the frame easier than a conventional, and go quite a ways.

Never much thought about safety, cabovers were made in response to length restrictions only.

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Different story everywhere but the US and AU....don't believe I saw anything BUT cabovers in the EU. Maybe being first to the accident isn't so critical when you can't drive over 30--or 20?

 

I've always enjoyed seeing how slightly different situations can result in major differences in actual operation while still being "efficient". There is no 'one size fits all'!

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Guest Lostinaz

Even in Europe, it's about length.

I used to live in that cabover and thought it was good.

When I got a conventional and could stand up in the sleeper and change clothes it was a lot better.

People were not watching you lying on your back trying to put your pants on or use that jug.

I guess there are flat floor cabovers with stand up sleepers now, but there sure weren't when I was driving that cabover.

I like that big engine out front in cold weather too-sometimes the heater was pretty marginal when the front of the cab was coated in ice.

I guess you would have had to put some time on the road in an old cabover to appreciate what we have available today.

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